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The Problem with Forever
     

The Problem with Forever

4.7 34
by Jennifer L. Armentrout
 

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"Heartbreakingly real…a remarkable novel about the power of first love and the courage it takes to face your fears." —Kami Garcia, #1 New York Times bestselling author

From #1 New York Times bestselling author Jennifer L. Armentrout comes a riveting story about friendship, survival and finding your voice.

Growing up,

Overview

"Heartbreakingly real…a remarkable novel about the power of first love and the courage it takes to face your fears." —Kami Garcia, #1 New York Times bestselling author

From #1 New York Times bestselling author Jennifer L. Armentrout comes a riveting story about friendship, survival and finding your voice.

Growing up, Mallory Dodge learned that the best way to survive was to say nothing. And even though it’s been four years since her nightmare ended, she’s beginning to worry that the fear that holds her back will last a lifetime. Now, after years of homeschooling, Mallory must face a new milestone—spending her senior year at a public high school. But she never imagined she’d run into Rider Stark, the friend and protector she hasn’t seen since childhood, on her very first day.

It doesn’t take long for Mallory to realize that the connection she shared with Rider never really faded. Yet soon it becomes apparent that she’s not the only one grappling with lingering scars from the past. And as she watches Rider’s life spiral out of control, Mallory must make a choice between staying silent and speaking out—for the people she loves, the life she wants and the truths that need to be heard.

Praise

"This book blew me away, completely. Gripping from page one, I—quite literally—couldn’t put it down."
—Christina Lauren, New York Times bestselling author

"We’re left breathless and a little haunted and wanting more."
—Danielle Paige, New York Times bestselling author

"An achingly real masterpiece… Heart-wrenching, heartwarming, heart-everything."
—Wendy Higgins, New York Times bestselling author

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
03/07/2016
Seventeen-year-old Mallory Dodge is as meek as her old nickname, “Mouse,” and Armentrout (the Dark Elements series) layers her backstory with significant challenges: Mallory lived in foster homes, was abused, and is nearly mute and trying to learn to speak again without fear. Mallory’s present is filled with equally remarkable fortune: she has been adopted by kind doctors; sparks fly when she runs into Rider, her one-time foster home protector, at her new school; and people are generally patient, welcoming, and kind to her. Though Armentrout creates a diverse cast of characters (Rider, Mallory’s parents, and several other characters share Latino backgrounds), they tend to be short on dimension. Rider is an ever-understanding hero, his girlfriend is cartoonishly mean, and Mallory’s adoptive parents are nearly perfect. Mallory spends the bulk of the novel shrinking in the face of everything, and at times her innocent demeanor feels contrived. But Armentrout’s effort to gradually coax her protagonist from her shell via a supportive, loving community succeeds, and readers looking for an inspirational comeback story will find Mallory’s to be satisfying and hopeful. Ages 14–up. Agent: Kevan Lyon, Marsal Lyon Literary Agency. (May)
From the Publisher
"The intensity between Mouse and Rider is palpably sizzling... romance aficionados [will] lose themselves in Mouse and Rider's smoldering glances and steamy kisses." -Kirkus Reviews

"Armentrout's effort to gradually coax her protagonist from her shell via a supportive, loving community succeeds, and readers looking for an inspirational comeback story will find Mallory's to be satisfying and hopeful" -Publishers Weekly

"[THE PROBLEM WITH FOREVER is] an amazing book that doesn't pull any punches. And, it will make you look at the world just a little differently." -Krista's Dust Jacket

"A beautiful story about family, friends, falling in love and finding yourself" -The Reading Geek

"Another Armentrout masterpiece." -Mundie Moms

"[THE PROBLEM WITH FOREVER has] burrowed itself deep in my heart." -Love Between the Sheets

"Beautiful and perfectly heartbreaking." -K-Books

"Far more than a contemporary romance, it's a lesson in life." -Once Upon a Twilight

"Well-worth the tears and Kleenexes." -The Book Swarm

"A story that you will never forget." -The Book Bratz

VOYA, August 2016 (Vol. 39, No. 3) - Lucy Schall
Seventeen-year-old Mallory Dodge enters her speech class, recognizes Rider Stark, the boy who protected her four years before in their abusive foster home, and begins a journey to overcome her past to become a person who can truly love. When their foster parents physically abused either Rider or Mallory, Rider confronted them and Mallory hid in the closet. Rider comforted Mallory by reading aloud The Velveteen Rabbit, her favorite story. One night, the foster father threw her doll, a gift from Rider, into the fire. She attempted to retrieve it. The surgeon who repaired her arms adopted her. Mallory is now financially privileged and emotionally supported. Rider is still in the foster system. Living with a grandmother and her two grandsons, he supports himself by painting and detailing cars. Rider again takes on the protector role as former home-schooled Mallory struggles with public school, especially the required speech class. Their worlds collide when Mallory’s adoptive father questions their relationship and Rider’s foster brother involves himself in drug trafficking. Mallory decides to become strong and challenges Rider to do the same. Steamy scenes and soap-opera emotion dominate. Mallory must find her voice, literally and figuratively. Rider must shed his impossible rescuer role. The conclusion is a touching interpretation of what lasts forever, but the ending requires a romanticized view of self-control, parenting, and the path of true love. Armentrout fans will line up for it. Reviewer: Lucy Schall; Ages 15 to 18.
School Library Journal
04/01/2016
Gr 9 Up—Engaging characters and real-life drama make for a potential hit with teens, if they can overlook the stock, repetitive romantic descriptions. Mallory (aka Mouse) is living with successful, caring adoptive parents after a horrific childhood in foster homes. She decides to attend public high school after years of homeschooling. Her world is rocked when Rider enters her speech class; Rider was her lifeline in the foster home, taking many beatings for her and teaching her how to hide and stay quiet to avoid Mr. Henry's wrath. While the protagonist seems shackled by her past, Rider appears to have moved forward, complete with a swagger and a laissez-fair attitude. They spend time together, and their relationship starts to grow from Mouse and her white knight to much more. Unfortunately, Rider's lifestyle and family link him with some unsavory characters. Mallory and Rider must evaluate their relationship—who really has changed, and is it for the better? The situations are gritty but presented in an accessible manner. One frankly depicted sex scene makes this more appropriate for high school readers. VERDICT An easy sell to teens wanting to experience a frank if predictable coming-of-age romance.—Lisa Ehrle, Falcon Creek Middle School, CO
Kirkus Reviews
2016-03-02
After surviving a horrific foster home together, a girl is reunited with the boy who always sought to protect her. Mallory—dubbed Mouse due to her selective mutism—grew up in a foster home with two abusive addicts. The white girl relied on biracial Latino/white Rider, another ward in the home, to keep her safe and serve as her protector. When the violence in the foster home came to a head, 13-year-old Mouse and Rider were removed from it and ultimately separated. When the novel opens, four years have passed, and Mouse has been adopted by Carlos and Rosa Rivas, wealthy physicians, who have dedicated themselves to helping her heal from past trauma and have home-schooled her. Rider, however, is still in foster care and lives a more dangerous life on the wrong side of the tracks. When Mouse enrolls in high school for her senior year, she is reunited with Rider, and though they've gone in opposite directions, their mutual past—and their blazing chemistry—pulls them together. Although the intensity between Mouse and Rider is palpably sizzling, the all-too-conventional trope of the quiet girl and the bad boy is played out in classic formula fashion, sinking in its own clichés. However, die-hard romance aficionados may be able to overlook the boilerplate plotting and simply lose themselves in Mouse and Rider's smoldering glances and steamy kisses. A mainstream romance that covers well-trod territory. (Romance. 13 & up)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780373212057
Publisher:
Harlequin
Publication date:
05/17/2016
Pages:
480
Sales rank:
10,797
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.40(h) x 1.70(d)
Lexile:
HL630L (what's this?)
Age Range:
14 - 17 Years

Meet the Author

# 1 New York Times and USA TODAY bestselling author Jennifer L. Armentrout lives in Martinsburg, West Virginia with her husband and her Jack Russell, Loki. Jennifer writes young adult paranormal, science fiction, fantasy, and contemporary romance. She also writes adult and New Adult romance under the name J. Lynn. Find her on Twitter @JLArmentrout or become a fan on Facebook and Goodreads.

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The Problem with Forever 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 34 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Jennifer l. Armentrout is one of my favorite authors. It's the none paranormal books that stick with you the real word a person can relate to stuff, don't look back, wait for you series, frigid are few examples that keep the book or eReader in your hand from page one to the last page. Not the the lux series and wicked and covenant weren't equally excellent reads; but, Mallory and Rider fit this real world feel. They were together in a bad situation and they never thought they'd see each other again and four years later they can't believe they have been wrong. Mallory found a good path while Rider life a harder road. I was hooked the minute Rider asked " Mouse?" This is good read and not one to be passed up.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was so good, love the way she writes!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Can't wait for the next book she writes!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
OMG, another amazing book.!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book has said so many things I never knew how to say it was Beautiful and Real, in a way not much out there is. I Love it and thank you to J. Lynn for writing it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved it from beginning to end! I would love to read a sequel :)
Anonymous 7 days ago
Ive reread it sooooo many times and it never gets old!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I would love to read a sequel!
Lisa-LostInLiterature More than 1 year ago
I jointly reviewed this with my co-blogger, Becca! “Forever was something we all took for granted, but the problem with forever was that it really didn't exist.” THE STORY: Lisa : After suffering with a traumatic childhood, Mallory is now in the care of two trusted, supportive and loving parents. She's attempting her senior year in a public school after being home-schooled for many years, yet it's not the easy task since she's still struggling with the after-affects of the abuse. On the very first day, Mallory runs into Rider, the sole good memory she has of those horrible years in foster care hell. The connection with Rider is instant... as if they had never been apart. Rider is also struggling with issues from his past, and he's on a vicious spiral downward. Mallory's habit of staying mute is being tortured as she struggles with the decision to stay silent or speak out and try to save her friend, the only person who stuck by her during those bad years. As you can tell... lots of feels in this story. Two struggled teens who spent a horrible time together, now reunited, and both still dealing with overcoming the trauma they both suffered. Becca : I couldn't have said it better myself Lisa!! Both Mallory and Rider endured such a traumatic childhood. A decade of their childhood was spent being neglected and abused and the only thing they had to get through it was each other. Just the concept alone gave me all kinds of feels for these two characters. THE CHARACTERS: Becca : The Problem with Forever begins on Mallory's first day of high school and is told from her POV. Mallory can speak, but chooses to be mostly mute out of fear because of her childhood. It is not that she doesn't want to talk, it's that she freezes in fear and cannot force words out. My heart broke for Mallory, after years of abuse as a child she is adopted by a loving family and even after years of therapy is still trying to put the pieces together. When she sees Rider at her new school, it is both good because he was her lifeline as a child and bad because it brings back so many unwanted and repressed memories. Rider appears to have it all together, as if he has worked through every issue from his childhood. After a year in a group home, he was placed in a foster home where he gains two almost brother Hector and Jayden. It is not in the nice part of town and he is still labeled as "trouble" but he is safe a fed there. I loved the relationship between Rider and Mallory, it was so warm and comforting at first and then slowly turned to more. I really enjoyed the slow burn of the build up. Experiencing the stories of their childhood was so hard, after all they had went through I could fully understand their connection. I also fall big time for the "second chance romance" trope, it gets me every time! The secondary characters in this book were awesome too! Mallory's adoptive parents were so amazing and very important parts. I love a book where the parents are active in their child's life. Her best friend Ainsley was so fun and totally cool! Also Rider's BFF Hector was pretty awesome, and his little brother Jayden was so funny! Even Paige, Rider's ex was a good addition because I loved to hate her! Jennifer Armentrout did an amazing job of building these characters and helping them grow. There were times I was mad at Mallory for being so scared and afraid, but in the end it struck me as being all part of her journey. As for Rider, because of his
jenababy13 More than 1 year ago
The Problem With Forever is the type of book that makes me want to cry at the end. I'm not sure if it's from happiness, from feeling all the emotions the characters are experiencing, from the heartache of the events, or all of the above. All I know is that this book was one heck of a story and I loved every world-shattering part of it. We start off with our protagonist, Mallory, who essentially is a shell of a person. She's completely intact however, after a traumatic childhood, she keeps everything inside and is extremely introvert. She finally decides, after having a break through couple years to go to a brick and mortar high school. It's there that she is bombarded with social situations she didn't imagine but also comes face to face with her past. I must admit, I truly enjoyed being inside of Mallory's head as odd as that sounds. There was one point semi-early in the book where a quote she says just hit me and has haunted me since I read the words. "My name is Mallory... Dodge." I drew in a deep breath, speaking to no one. "And I like... I like reading. And I don't like... I don't like who I am." I feel like these words just shook me to the bone. Without a doubt, everyone has felt this at some point in their life. For me, I adore reading and there has been so many times that I have questioned myself or didn't like what I have seen in the mirror. These words truly made you feel what she was feeling not just in that moment, but essentially her whole life. Following her was unlike any other character I have read and I adore every moment of watching her grow and change. With our other characters, you cannot help but love them all in some way. Each friend and adult somehow finds their way into their heart. I'd go into specifics but, Rosa, Jayden, Hector, Kiera, Ainsley, and even Paige all affect you in some form or another. Then, there's Rider. Oh Rider. The sexy, smart knight in shining armor who deserves the world and doesn't see it. You cannot help but root for this boy every step of the way. Overall, I adored every piece of this story. There were so many parts that shattered me, some that made me melt, and some that made me smile with happiness. The Problem With Forever is definitely a story worth reading and I would recommend it to everyone.
Boundlessbookreviews More than 1 year ago
The Problem with Forever, is the first book I’ve read of Armentrout’s. I see her books everywhere and was ready to fall into one. The Problem with Forever is at times hard to digest. Mallory went through so much. She had Rider to protect her, through the worst parts of her life. Though, I felt that this story was heartbreaking but also heartwarming. I never fell into the characters. I didn’t find the connection with them that I desperately wanted. It’s a good/enjoyable story of a girl who turned from this meek little mouse, to a girl who knew what she wanted. Who wasn’t afraid to fight for what she wanted. Some things just seemed a little glossed over. Like, oh yeah this happened but there was no emotional pull for me. I was honestly, slightly disappointed because I truly wanted to love this. The writing is done well, the characters develop through out the story. The story itself was intriguing and I wanted to see what happened next. Overall, I give this book Three Boundless Stars. It was a good story....Lissa
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She's one of my favorites (if not my number one) so she did not disappoint with this book. The plot is beautiful, the story one people can connect with and the characters are very very real. Another AMAZING BOOK!!!!
FandomJunkie1 More than 1 year ago
You know when you read a book that's so good that when something cute of awkward happens you have to close the book and take a moment to scream eternally? That's this book and I loved every minute. So happy I read it and got obsessed!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is amazing and well written. It is about overcoming fear and people trying to break away from there past.
LovinLosLibros More than 1 year ago
My goodness y'all. Where do I even start with this book? I always love JLA's books, but this one holds a lot of emotional power, especially being an educator of teens. These kids have a lot of emotional issues to deal with and they do their best to push them aside and go to school and not let the world see just how difficult it is to actually do that. Mallory and Rider both carry emotional scars from their past and they are trying to get beyond that, but do so in different ways. Mallory has been adopted into a great family and has such a strong support system that has helped her get the counseling she needs. They are a bit overprotective, but they mean well. They want to see her flourish and they encourage her to tackle the things that scare her. Rider, on the other hand, acts as if he doesn't have a care in the world. He has accepted his status in life and doesn't put forth the effort to try and change people's perceptions of him. He has been beaten down by his past and doesn't have very strong aspirations for the future. Armentrout always manages to pull me in with her books and I never want them to end. I wanted to speed through this one because I was so impatient to find out what happened. I love being engaged like this, because I really do feel like I am right there with the characters and their emotions all transfer to me as the reader. Mallory and Rider together were really adorable. I loved them. There is so much uncertainty and shyness and it was just precious to see them try to discern between the scared kids they once were into the teens they are now. Mallory isn't a frightened, weak little girl anymore who needs protecting. I loved seeing her come into her own and ask for support instead of help. She believes in Rider and she wants him to see the kind, wonderful, self-sacrificing guy she does. He has talent and she doesn't want him to waste that. They really worked together and I loved it. I loved our secondary cast of characters and how much of a role they played also. I love that they weren't pushed aside and that they were integral to these characters' lives. Overall, I can't recommend this one enough. It's one that needs to be experienced and while I could go on and on, I think you're better off jumping in and letting Armentrout work her magic.
ReedsReadsReviews More than 1 year ago
I love Jennifer L. Armentrout. Love, love, love her writing. I have yet to find something of hers that I haven’t fallen head over heels in love with – and The Problem with Forever is no exception. Be it New Adult romance, Young Adult fantasy or contemporary, Jennifer L. Armentrout is a masterful manipulator of words and feelings. The Problem with Forever is a hard hitting contemporary read worth every penny. Mallory is a sweet heart, a soft spoken and gentle soul. Of course, she has her reasons. Mallory has a horrific past, filled with violence and terror – but there is a single bright spot in it, and his name was Rider Stark. Mallory was a wonderful heroine. Watching her grow, seeing her journey from “Mouse” to someone who wasn’t afraid to stand up for what she believed in, was amazing. I really felt for her, I felt her struggle and I felt her learning how to hope. Armentrout has always had this ability to make characters that feel so completely real, so, so real it is like they are standing there in front of you. Even if you don’t have any way to relate to their circumstances or their history, you become a part of the characters. You feel what they feel, fear what they fear, and love what they love. Mallory is no different. While I cannot personally relate to anything she went through, Mallory is now a part of me and it is a part I will never let go of. I whole heartedly embrace being a Mouse, though I might have claws. Then we have the second half of the equation, the super-swoonworthy Rider Stark. OHHHH MY GOODNESS. Rider is…. I can’t even find the words to describe him. That reunion scene, when he and Mallory first see each other? I had tears in my eyes. Rider is something special, and when you put him Mallory it becomes feels central. I ship them so hard, I swear it made my teeth ache. Rider on his own, though, is wonderful. Of course, he has is faults – as do we all. He isn’t perfect, but he is perfect for Mallory. He is kind, considerate, smart, everything. He protected Mallory when they were children and he continues to do so now, though we soon figure out nothing is as it really seems. Rider’s journey, paired with Mallory’s, makes for an incredible tale of self-discovery and healing. The Problem with Forever is fantastic. It is heartwarming, heartbreaking, and thought provoking. It will make you cry, characters will make you crack up and others will make you want to rip out your hair. Everything is perfection. The characters are real, the plot even more so. This is the type of book that will stay with you forever, it will remain in your thoughts long after you’ve finished reading. Perhaps that is the problem with forever, it never leaves you. But I have to say, if The Problem with Forever will be a part of me for all the years to come, I couldn’t pick a better book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great book and such a strong message.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Brigittehf More than 1 year ago
This book is about growing up in a foster home where children are abused and the long lasting effects it leaves behind. Mallory was just a child when she suffered a terrible trauma and ended up in hospital. She was separated from her best friend and protector who wasn't much older than she was. Now, four years later, she is settled with loving adoptive parents who are somewhat overprotective. Quite understandable! After being homeschooled for four years with only Ainsley as her best friend, she faces the challenge of attenting High School. She is quiet and stays in the background to stay unnoticed. This, she learnt in foster care. Keeping quiet equates to not being abused! Conditioned from a young age to protect herself. Rider hasn't seen Mallory aka "Mouse" to him since that terrible incident but it wasn't for the lack of trying. He is now in a decent foster home, where he is treated as family. He hasn't forgotten about her and can only hope that she is in a good place. He is a talented artist but doesn't give himself credit. He is still the caring and protective boy from his childhood. On Mouse's first day at the school, she meets Rider. Neither of them can believe that their paths have crossed once again. This reunion is like a dream and they find that their friendship has not faded over the years. With that friendship comes another form of mutual attraction. As the story unfolds, they both find that there are still some hurdles to surmount. They are both still fighting with their own demons in different ways. As strong as their bond is, they are in a situation which could make or break them. Can they overcome these hurdles to make the most of this second chance that they have been given? This story brings out the long term effects of childhood abuse. It's heartbreaking and heartwarming at the same time. Watching Mouse struggle to fit in and have the life that she deserves brings out all kinds of emotions. Rider copes in a totally different way and until he admits to these feelings which hold him back, he can't really move forward. I love both Rider and Mouse. They have this unconditional love for each other despite their emotional and psychological scars. It's a story that goes straight to the heart and quite likely never to be forgotten. I was kindly issued with an advanced ecopy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
BlkosinerBookBlog More than 1 year ago
The problem with forever is everything that I've come to expect from JLA, it has great characters and a steamy romance. It made me laugh it made me sympathize with the character and feel their pain. I like how this story really took two people who came from a similar background and showed how they could overcome things in their own ways and that they had just different struggles and different way of dealing with everything. I really felt for her because she had grown up pretty much conditioned that noise and speaking is bad so she's very quiet and it comes across as shy. it's hard for her to talk to new people or to make new friends but she is starting public school for the first time in a long time and she's put face-to-face with a bunch of these insecurities. On top of all of that a boy from her past someone she thought she'd never see again is also going to her school. I love seeing them reconnect and he was very protective of her in their group home and saved her from a lot of physical pain and protected her emotionally as best as he could. they had to find a unique balance of him still wanting to protect her and how much she cares about her and also how much she's growing up as a person and doesn't really need all the sheltering and does need to learn to use her voice and found the right way to communicate with other people. I like the family dynamics in this one. of course we get to see the very rough side of the foster system in the way that she and Ryder grew up. but we also get to see her taken into a very loving home and how much they provided for her and helped her daughter through therapy and is still supporting her. Though they did have to learn how to let go and let her make her own decisions and trust in those especially as she is interacting with Ryder because he hangs out with a rougher crowd. even though he's in a home with the woman who really cares about her and has two brother like figures he's gotten into some trouble and one of his foster brothers the woman's actual grandson is in some trouble. I liked the ending and how things wrapped up for them. She learned to stand up for herself, to use her voice, and she helped Ryder see the potential in himself and make steps towards his future, and letting himself believe that he's worthy. Bottom Line: Loved it, all I love about the author.
Denisemouse More than 1 year ago
I just finished reading "the Problem with Forever"... and it is a real eye opener of what can happen in a real bad situation. Mallory (Mouse) Dodge was a young girl that grew up in cruel Foster Home for 12 years along with her best friend Rider. Rider was her protector who would keep her safe when the foster dad wanted to beat her for something that was done... Mallory grew to fear talking and used it as a shield for her protection... So, Mallory grew up with lots of emotional baggage... years later after a tragic accident (she was burned severely) two doctors who help Mallory over come her talking issues and they adopt her.... now that Mallory is in her senior year she makes the decision that it's time to go to a real high school and graduate so she can go to College... It's scary at first for her and then she is reunited with Rider after 4 years.... I really loved reading this book... If you want to know what happens you need to read the book ... Once you read it you will like it too... Awesome work Jennifer L. Armentrout
Book_Crazy02 More than 1 year ago
Jennifer L. Armentrout has never disappointed in terms of her novels and writing style. In every single one of her books she has created worlds, social structures, and complex characters that I fall in love with every single time! I never know what to expect yet I'm always pleasantly surprised by the storyline and all the different ways drama is created and then resolved again. This remains true in The Problem with Forever and the fact that the characters and the plot line brought around definitely stuck a chord and had me crying and laughing and just enjoying the entire reading experience. This book tells the story of a girl named Mallory and her transition and growth from a past which has taken her voice into a young women who can fight her own battles and express her opinions. Mallory personified strength yet she didn't know she possessed this strength and it almost hid from her within her memories and her "lost" voice. Nicknamed "Mouse" by her childhood protector, Mallory allows this nickname to become her life and does her best to subconsciously personify a mouse. There were so many emotions within this novel. I truly felt like I was invested in the novel and these characters because there was such a strong writing voice within Mallory and I could picture every detail of her life and the struggles she faced to overcome her past an make peace with her life experiences. There was so much heartbreak within this novel, literally at every turn, that I constantly was crying and getting caught up in the characters. The interesting part of this romance novel was the fact that there really was no "villain" except those in the past. Mallory definitely has the definition of a "tough childhood" and this childhood constantly interfered with her present life and it was those figures from her past which caused her constant fear and pain. Even the usual ex-girlfriend of the love interest (Rider) wasn't really a villain for even though she definitely causes some trouble for Mallory, she does it because she truly liked Rider and for me that was completely understandable and therefore redeemable. Mallory was a character who will grab onto your heart and not let go. Her struggles will become your struggles as her journey to find her voice and her courage. I loved her as a character because as a reader you see her strength slowly overcoming her fear and her shyness. She truly had a heart of gold and some of my favorite parts involved her and Rider figuring out their past and where that past fit into their future. Speaking of Rider... DANG! Now I can only imagine because this is a book, but boy does Armentrout make him sound so freakin' fine. I loved his character, even with all the drama he creates, and I loved his protective nature and his determination to always be what Mallory needs. Yah, Rider is definitely my current book bf because of his absolute devotion and kindness to Mallory and all of the other characters within this novel. Rider and Mallory's relationship was truly amazing to read about because even as it added a little spice to the novel, it remained innocent and perfect and completely appropriate for the characters being in high school and the genre of the novel. Overall, this novel was true perfection and I am so glad I was able to read and enjoy the characters and their relationship as they worked to overcome the nightmares of their pasts. The perfect way they survived their childhoods only to be reconnected again in
Book_Crazy02 More than 1 year ago
Jennifer L. Armentrout has never disappointed in terms of her novels and writing style. In every single one of her books she has created worlds, social structures, and complex characters that I fall in love with every single time! I never know what to expect yet I'm always pleasantly surprised by the storyline and all the different ways drama is created and then resolved again. This remains true in The Problem with Forever and the fact that the characters and the plot line brought around definitely stuck a chord and had me crying and laughing and just enjoying the entire reading experience. This book tells the story of a girl named Mallory and her transition and growth from a past which has taken her voice into a young women who can fight her own battles and express her opinions. Mallory personified strength yet she didn't know she possessed this strength and it almost hid from her within her memories and her "lost" voice. Nicknamed "Mouse" by her childhood protector, Mallory allows this nickname to become her life and does her best to subconsciously personify a mouse. There were so many emotions within this novel. I truly felt like I was invested in the novel and these characters because there was such a strong writing voice within Mallory and I could picture every detail of her life and the struggles she faced to overcome her past an make peace with her life experiences. There was so much heartbreak within this novel, literally at every turn, that I constantly was crying and getting caught up in the characters. The interesting part of this romance novel was the fact that there really was no "villain" except those in the past. Mallory definitely has the definition of a "tough childhood" and this childhood constantly interfered with her present life and it was those figures from her past which caused her constant fear and pain. Even the usual ex-girlfriend of the love interest (Rider) wasn't really a villain for even though she definitely causes some trouble for Mallory, she does it because she truly liked Rider and for me that was completely understandable and therefore redeemable. Mallory was a character who will grab onto your heart and not let go. Her struggles will become your struggles as her journey to find her voice and her courage. I loved her as a character because as a reader you see her strength slowly overcoming her fear and her shyness. She truly had a heart of gold and some of my favorite parts involved her and Rider figuring out their past and where that past fit into their future. Speaking of Rider... DANG! Now I can only imagine because this is a book, but boy does Armentrout make him sound so freakin' fine. I loved his character, even with all the drama he creates, and I loved his protective nature and his determination to always be what Mallory needs. Yah, Rider is definitely my current book bf because of his absolute devotion and kindness to Mallory and all of the other characters within this novel. Rider and Mallory's relationship was truly amazing to read about because even as it added a little spice to the novel, it remained innocent and perfect and completely appropriate for the characters being in high school and the genre of the novel. Overall, this novel was true perfection and I am so glad I was able to read and enjoy the characters and their relationship as they worked to overcome the nightmares of their pasts. The perfect way they survived their childhoods only to be reconnected again in
TheThoughtSpot More than 1 year ago
The Problem with Forever by Jennifer Armentrout pulled me in from page one! This complex book tells about the present situation of two previously abused teenagers and the protective relationship between the two of them. Mallory and Rider have known each other since they were small and living together in a foster home. By page thirty-nine, the amazing way that Rider took care of Mallory when they were younger got to me and I began all-out crying because it was so touching. The Problem with Forever deals with some tough issues and the author handles these issues with dignity and kindness. After reading this story, I felt inspired and like my soul had been lightened. It's like therapy! This is the first book of Jennifer Armentrout's that I have read, but it will not be the last! I am very impressed with her writing and I have a feeling that this realistic fiction book will stick with me for a very long time.