The Professional Writer: A Guide for Advanced Technical Writing

The Professional Writer: A Guide for Advanced Technical Writing

by Gerald J. Alred, Charles T. Brusaw, Walter E. Olin
     
 

ISBN-10: 0312002483

ISBN-13: 9780312002480

Pub. Date: 09/28/1991

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780312002480
Publisher:
St. Martin's Press
Publication date:
09/28/1991
Pages:
426
Product dimensions:
7.66(w) x 9.47(h) x 0.88(d)

Related Subjects

Table of Contents

Preface vii
The Professional Writer
1(18)
Definitions of Technical Writing
1(1)
The Origins and Growth of Technical Writing
2(1)
The Products of Technical Writing
3(1)
Professional Roles and Settings
4(1)
The Technical Writer's Responsibilities
5(1)
The Technical Writer's Competencies
6(4)
Writing Skills
6(3)
Technical Knowledge
9(1)
Interpersonal Skills
9(1)
Critical Thinking
9(1)
Research Skills
10(1)
Management Skills
10(1)
Academic Preparation
10(2)
Developing an Appropriate Background
11(1)
Technical Writing Programs
11(1)
Finding a Job
12(1)
Professional Organizations
12(3)
The Case History
15(4)
The Document Process
19(13)
The Document Process Defined
20(4)
Document Need Assessment
20(2)
Document Analysis
22(1)
Research
22(1)
Document Drafts
22(1)
Review and Evaluation
23(1)
Editing
24(1)
Production
24(1)
Principles of the Document Process
24(1)
The Writer's Role in the Process
25(3)
The Case History
28(4)
The Writing Team
32(20)
The Functional Writing Team
33(1)
The Peer Writing Team
34(6)
Composition of the Peer Writing Team
34(1)
Functions of the Peer Writing Team
34(1)
Planning
34(1)
Research and Writing
35(1)
Reviewing
35(1)
Revising
36(1)
Conflict in a Peer Writing Team
36(1)
Advantages and Disadvantages of the Peer Writing Team
36(1)
Leading the Peer Writing Team
37(1)
Project Style Guidelines
37(1)
Schedule
38(1)
Review Transmittal Sheet
38(2)
The Supervised Writing Team
40(4)
Manager
41(1)
Project Leader
42(1)
Writer
43(1)
Cost Estimates
44(2)
Project Schedules
46(3)
The Case History
49(3)
Audience, Purpose, Scope, and Overall Design
52(25)
Analyzing Your Audience
53(9)
Reading Theory and Its Implications
53(2)
Methods for Determining Specific Audience Needs
55(1)
Categorical Methods
55(5)
Heuristic Approach
60(2)
Refining the Purpose and Scope of the Document
62(3)
Purpose of the Document
62(2)
Scope of the Document
64(1)
Requirements of Audience and Purpose
64(1)
External Constraints on Scope
65(1)
Overall Design
65(9)
Modular Design
67(2)
Visual Design
69(5)
The Case History
74(3)
Gathering Information
77(26)
Getting the Assignment
77(1)
Researching Documents
78(2)
Similar or Related Documents
78(1)
Relevant In-House Documents
79(1)
Trade Documents
80(1)
Copyright Permission
80(1)
Computerized Information Retrieval
80(4)
In-House Systems
82(1)
Bibliographic Databases
82(2)
Interviewing for Information
84(5)
In-Person Interviews
84(2)
Interpersonal Skills
86(1)
Nonverbal Communication
87(1)
Telephone Interviews
87(1)
Recording Information
88(1)
Note Taking
88(1)
Tape Recording
89(1)
Confidentiality
89(1)
Tapping Your Own Knowledge as a Source
89(4)
Brainstorming
90(1)
Handwritten Brainstorming
90(1)
Computer-Aided Brainstorming
90(1)
Mind Mapping
91(2)
Operating a Product or a Device
93(1)
Observing People and Processes
94(1)
Questionnaires
95(4)
The Case History
99(4)
Organizing Information for a Document
103(21)
Organizing Your Subject
105(4)
Organizing Strategies
105(1)
Influencing Factors
106(1)
The Internal Logic of Your Subject
106(1)
Your Readers' Needs
107(1)
The Purpose of Your Document
108(1)
All Factors Combined
109(1)
Structuring Your Document
109(7)
Creating Your Outline
111(4)
Aids for Organizing Your Outline
115(1)
Brainstorming
115(1)
Flip Chart or Chalkboard
115(1)
Experimenting with Your Topic Outline
115(1)
Computer Programs
116(1)
Working with Prescribed Formats
116(3)
The Case History
119(5)
Integrating Visuals
124(36)
What Kinds of Visuals Should I Use?
125(2)
Where Will the Visuals Appear?
127(9)
Placement of Visuals
127(8)
Circumstances of Document Use
135(1)
When Should Visuals Be Prepared?
136(1)
Who Will Prepare the Visuals?
137(18)
Using Existing Visuals
137(1)
In-House Publications
137(1)
Visuals Published Elsewhere
137(1)
Stock Visual Materials
138(1)
Working with Graphic Designers
138(3)
Preparing Your Own Visuals
141(1)
Manual Visuals
141(1)
Computer Graphics
142(13)
The Case History
155(5)
Layout and Design
160(43)
Theory of Design
162(3)
Using Typography
165(10)
Selecting a Typeface
167(1)
Legibility
167(2)
Practical Considerations
169(1)
Serif versus Sans Serif
169(1)
Choosing Type Size
170(2)
Adjusting Spaces between Letters and between Words
172(1)
Adjusting Line Length and Leading
173(1)
Choosing Justified or Ragged Right Margins
174(1)
Using Highlighting and Finding Devices
175(5)
Typographical Emphasis
176(1)
Headings and Captions
176(2)
Headers and Footers
178(1)
Rules, Icons, and Color
179(1)
Designing the Page
180(9)
Using a Grid
181(2)
Defining Columns
183(4)
Using White Space
187(1)
Using Lists
187(1)
Using Illustrations
188(1)
Packaging the Document
189(9)
Binding the Document
190(3)
Publication Cover
193(1)
Selecting Paper
193(1)
Size and Weight
193(1)
Porosity and Durability
194(1)
Grades of Paper
194(4)
The Case History
198(5)
Drafting a Document
203(21)
Developing Confidence
203(2)
Using Time Management Tactics
205(1)
Allocate Your Time
205(1)
Prepare Your Work Environment
205(1)
Use Boilerplate
206(1)
Remain Flexible
206(1)
Communicating with the Reader
206(3)
Empathize with Your Reader
207(1)
Visualize the Reader and the Setting
207(1)
Understand Your Readers' Roles
207(1)
Establish Your Role and Your "Voice"
208(1)
Opening the Document
209(3)
Full Introductions
209(1)
Openings
210(1)
Summaries
211(1)
Abstracts
211(1)
Prefaces and Forewards
212(1)
"How to Use This Document" Sections
212(1)
Special Previewing and Finding Devices
212(3)
Tables of Contents
213(1)
Headings
213(1)
References
214(1)
Glossaries
215(1)
Indexes
215(1)
Concluding the Document
215(5)
Full Conclusions
215(1)
Concluding Elements
215(1)
Appendixes
216(4)
The Case History
220(4)
Revising Your Writing
224(22)
Viewing Your Draft Objectively: Distancing Techniques
225(1)
Allow a Cooling Period
225(1)
Edit as a Reader
225(1)
Revise in Passes
225(1)
Be Alert for Your Most Frequent Errors
226(1)
Read Aloud
226(1)
Get an Outside Critique
226(1)
Managing the Revision Process
226(1)
Checking for Organization
227(1)
Checking for Scope, Completeness, Accuracy, and Consistency
227(1)
The Principles of an Effective Style
228(14)
Appropriate Pace
228(2)
Appropriate Tone
230(1)
Sentence Sophistication
231(1)
Effective Sentence Construction
231(3)
Effective Sentence Length
234(2)
Effective Sentence Variety
236(2)
Signaling Semantic Relationships
238(1)
Subordination
238(1)
Emphasis
239(1)
Parallel Structure
239(1)
Transition
239(1)
Monitoring Technical Jargon
239(1)
Monitoring Acronyms and Initialisms
240(2)
The Case History
242(4)
Review and Evaluation
246(30)
Reviews
247(7)
Types of Reviews
248(1)
Documentation Plan Review
248(1)
Peer Review
248(1)
Technical Review
248(1)
Customer Service Review
249(1)
Marketing Review
249(1)
Edit Review
249(1)
Management Review
249(1)
Legal Review
249(1)
A Typical Review Procedure
250(1)
The Management Review
250(1)
The Peer Review
250(1)
The Technical Review
251(1)
Identifying Reviewers
251(1)
Conducting the Reviews
251(1)
Preparing the Document
251(1)
Briefing Reviewers
252(2)
Using Review Comments
254(1)
Usability Tests
254(11)
Test Subjects
254(1)
Test Monitors
255(1)
The Test
256(3)
Conducting the Test
259(1)
The Planning Phase
259(1)
The Preparation Phase
259(3)
The Implementation Phase
262(1)
The Evaluation Phase
263(2)
Customer Validation Tests
265(2)
Customer Feedback
267(4)
The Case History
271(5)
Editing the Work of Others
276(42)
The Editing Process
277(10)
The Organization Edit
278(1)
The Content Edit
278(3)
The Copy Edit
281(2)
The Editorial Style Edit
283(4)
Working with Authors
287(2)
Working with Other Document Specialists
289(1)
Mechanics of Copymarking
290(2)
Editing Online
292(1)
Levels of Edit
293(7)
The Case History
300(18)
Document Production
318(26)
Typewritten Copy
319(2)
Typeset Copy
321(15)
Traditional Typesetting
321(2)
Galleys and Dummies
323(2)
Page Proofs
325(2)
Pages to Mechanicals
327(1)
Blueline Proofs
327(1)
Halftones and Color Separations
328(2)
Electronic Publishing
330(1)
Corporate Documents and Electronic Publishing Systems
331(2)
System Input
333(1)
Composition and Pagination
334(1)
Output
334(2)
Printing
336(6)
The Case History
342(2)
Creating Document Standards
344(22)
Definition of Standards
344(1)
Purposes of Standards
345(1)
How to Establish Standards
346(3)
Determine What Kind of Standards You Need
347(1)
Collaborating to Prepare Standards
348(1)
Possible Issues to Standardize
349(6)
Type of Document
349(1)
Sections and Sequence
349(1)
Writing Style
350(1)
Editorial Style
350(1)
Access Aids
351(1)
Page Format
351(2)
Graphic Devices
353(2)
In-House Policies and Procedures
355(1)
Warnings and Liability
355(6)
Language of Warnings
357(1)
Visual Symbols and Signal Words
358(3)
The Case History
361(5)
Online Documentation
366(21)
Types of Online Documentation
367(4)
Quick References
367(1)
Requests for Assistance
367(2)
Tutorials
369(1)
Hypertext
370(1)
Determining When to Use Online Documentation
371(1)
Requirements of Online Documentation
372(4)
Design Considerations
373(1)
Access Methods
373(1)
Organization
373(3)
Writing Style Guidelines
376(1)
Getting Your Online Documentation into the System
376(11)
Appendix: Introduction to Using the International Banking System 387(32)
Index 419

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