The Professor and the Pupil: The Politics of W. E. B. Du Bois and Paul Robeson

Overview


W. E. B. Du Bois and Paul Robeson were both leading figures of the African American movement; their writing and teachings continue to inspire people around the world today. The Professor and the Pupil chronicles the 40-year friendship between Du Bois and Paul Robeson. Journalist Murali Balaji explores how both men evolved into leaders of the American Left, examining their philosophical transformation and their alienation from mainstream political thought following World War II. Balaji also explains why Du Bois ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (10) from $3.90   
  • New (2) from $16.84   
  • Used (8) from $3.90   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$16.84
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(811)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
2007 Paperback New

Ships from: Seaford, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$18.95
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(241)

Condition: New
2007 Paperback New

Ships from: State College, PA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview


W. E. B. Du Bois and Paul Robeson were both leading figures of the African American movement; their writing and teachings continue to inspire people around the world today. The Professor and the Pupil chronicles the 40-year friendship between Du Bois and Paul Robeson. Journalist Murali Balaji explores how both men evolved into leaders of the American Left, examining their philosophical transformation and their alienation from mainstream political thought following World War II. Balaji also explains why Du Bois and Robeson became ostracized for their political views and why so few African American leaders stood up to defend them during the height of the Cold War. In examining the lives of both men, The Professor and the Pupil also details the changing social and political conditions around the world that led Du Bois and Robeson to their political epiphanies and eventually their downfall in the United States.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
The radical politics and intersecting careers of two African-American icons. At the outset of World War II, only a handful of black Americans were as internationally prominent as Paul Robeson, an actor/singer of extraordinary power, and W.E.B. Du Bois, an uncommonly influential intellectual. Famed for their professional achievements and their civil-rights activism, both men held radical political beliefs that eventually diminished them as spokesmen for their race, alienated other African-American leaders and aroused the fears of the white establishment. During the Cold War, the federal government subjected both to FBI surveillance, revoked their passports, prosecuted Du Bois under the Smith Act and dragged Robeson before the House Committee on Un-American Activities. Rightly decrying the overheated political atmosphere that labeled both men national-security threats, a charge that seems laughable today, Balaji (House of Tinder, 2003) less persuasively condemns William H. Hastie, A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins and other mainstream civil-rights activists who failed to vigorously defend Robeson and Du Bois. Both men, after all, strenuously believed the Soviet Union had successfully eradicated racism and class division, thought Marxism the best hope for newly liberated African nations, turned a blind eye to the show trials and mass murders of Stalin and Mao and found more hope for their people in the pages of Das Kapital than in America's founding documents. It never occurs to Balaji that, in their final incarnations at least, Du Bois and Robeson could well be judged historically and morally wrong in crucial ways, and that civil-rights leaders had some justification for believing they woulddrag the movement over a precipice. Readers may grant both men the courage of their convictions and admire their many genuine achievements without buying wholesale the political perspective so uncritically recounted and adopted here. More agitprop than careful analysis: precariously conceived, awkwardly argued and sloppily written.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781568583556
  • Publisher: Nation Books
  • Publication date: 8/28/2007
  • Pages: 512
  • Product dimensions: 5.30 (w) x 8.10 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author


Murali Balaji is a fellow at Pennsylvania State University. He has over a decade of professional journalism experience, having written for the Washington Post, St. Paul Pioneer Press, Wilmington News Journal and other publications. He has is also a regular guest on Philadelphia area television and radio programs. He is the author of House of Tinder. He lives in Philadelphia, PA.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents


Acknowledgments     ix
Introduction     xiii
The Harlem Renaissance and the Birth of a Friendship     1
Dual Epiphanies     29
Du Bois, Robeson, and the Popular Front     65
Stalin's Purge, the Pact, and False Justification     97
World War II and the Domestic Battlefront     113
Africa, Asia, and the Global Vision     141
Convergence and Divergence     191
The "Witch Hunt" and the NAACP's Betrayal     229
Crash     281
Bonding through Disgrace     337
The Legacy of Two Fallen Icons     389
Notes     437
Index     465
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)