The Promise of Amazing

( 17 )

Overview

Robin Constantine's New Jersey romance The Promise of Amazing is a sexy, poignant, funny, and authentic debut novel that will appeal to fans of books by Stephanie Perkins, Sarah Mlynowski, and Jennifer E. Smith.

Wren Caswell is average. Ranked in the middle of her class at Sacred Heart, she's not popular, not a social misfit. Wren is the quiet good girl who's always done what she's supposed to—only now, in her junior year, this passive strategy...

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The Promise of Amazing

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Overview

Robin Constantine's New Jersey romance The Promise of Amazing is a sexy, poignant, funny, and authentic debut novel that will appeal to fans of books by Stephanie Perkins, Sarah Mlynowski, and Jennifer E. Smith.

Wren Caswell is average. Ranked in the middle of her class at Sacred Heart, she's not popular, not a social misfit. Wren is the quiet good girl who's always done what she's supposed to—only now, in her junior year, this passive strategy is backfiring. She wants to change but doesn't know how.

Grayson Barrett was the king of St. Gabe's: star of the lacrosse team, top of his class, and on the fast track to a brilliant future—until he was expelled for being a "term-paper pimp." Now Gray is in a downward spiral and needs to change but doesn't know how.

One fateful night, their paths cross at Wren's family's Arthurian-themed catering hall. What follows is the complicated, awkward, hilarious, and tender tale of two teens shedding their pasts, figuring out who they are—and falling in love.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
11/04/2013
First-time novelist Constantine puts some creative twists on the “opposites attract” theme in this well-crafted romance starring good-girl Wren Caswell and “brainathiminal” (combination brain, athlete, and criminal) Grayson Barrett. Told from the teens’ alternating points of view, the story begins when Wren, a waitress at her parents’ medieval-themed inn, saves the life of a choking guest. At this point, she knows nothing of the guest, Grayson, whose shady past got him expelled from his old private school, news Wren later acquires through gossip and confessions. When Grayson lands a job at the inn, the two begin to fall for each other, in spite—or perhaps because—of their different personalities. Conflicts arise as Grayson’s former partners in crime threaten to ruin his relationship with Wren, and Wren, tired of being labeled “bright but quiet,” grows too bold for her parents’ taste. Filled with action, passion, and adolescent angst, Constantine’s novel introduces two believable characters with strong, honest voices who work to find themselves as they chart new territory together. Ages 14–up. Agent: Tamar Rydzinski, Laura Dail Literary Agency. (Jan.)
Sarah Mlynowski
“You’re going to fall in love with this romantic (and scandalous!) read. It 100% lives up to its promise.”
The Bookish Daydreamer
“Will have you rooting for the bad boy to find his inner good, and for the good girl to open up her heart to love again.”
YA Love
“I was instantly hooked.”
Children's Literature - Bonita Herold
Wren Caswell and Grayson Barrett meet in an unusual way when she saves his life. A simple cocktail weenie brings them together. Sparks fly, and Cupid aims his arrow—two for the price of one. But can opposites really attract? Wren Caswell is a quiet, average high school junior who cannot even make it into the National Honor Society, let alone keep a boyfriend. She hopes to make herself heard without getting loud. Grayson Barrett is a senior with an alias of Mike Pearson. Mike is capable of lying and stealing to get what he and his buddies want, including a killer trip to Amsterdam. But once Gray gets expelled, that’s the end of Mike…or is it? When pressured by so-called friends to return to his prior ways, will Gray be able to resist? Lie builds on lie, and the tower topples. Maybe Wren would be better off avoiding a relationship altogether. Who needs the heartache? Readers may want to sequester themselves when they read this novel; if they do not, they will disturb the peace when they start yelling at Gray: “Don’t be stupid! Tell the truth!” This story will appeal to teenagers deciding what rules apply in starting a relationship. Can love conquer all? Reviewer: Bonita Herold; Ages 12 up.
VOYA, February 2014 (Vol. 36, No. 6) - Mary Ann Darby
When her Honors Lit teacher tells Wren Caswell’s junior class, “None of you are going to Harvard,” Wren is irritated. This comment, on top of Wren’s recent rejection from the National Honor Society at her prep school, leave her feeling too much like an average, quiet, nice girl—and she decides it is time to make a change, but she is not sure how. Working that weekend at her parents’ Arthurian-themed catering hall, Wren runs into high school senior Grayson Barrett who strikes her as a conceited jerk. But when she has to save his life using the Heimlich maneuver, she looks into his eyes and something shifts for both Wren and Gray. As two truly different teens find themselves drawn to one another, life intrudes in every way possible, from family turmoil to betrayal by classmates. Wren and Gray are able to forge ahead to find what is true and important in understanding themselves and forging a relationship. Dual narration by Grey and Wren provides two contrasting, but mostly authentic, voices of teens trying to make life changes. This is Constantine’s first novel, and while teens will find it very readable and the two central characters very likable, the change of heart by a key character at the end of the story strains credibility, making the wrap-up a bit too neat for those who are looking for a realistic depiction of teen struggles. Language, casual sexual liaisons, and pervasive use of alcohol by characters make this a choice for high school readers. Reviewer: Mary Ann Darby; Ages 15 to 18.
Kirkus Reviews
2013-09-25
Good girl tames bad boy in Constantine's first novel. High school junior Wren Caswell has entered her "semester of discontent." Denied entry to Sacred Heart Academy's National Honor Society for being "too quiet" and ranked No. 49 out of 102 students, Wren has never stood out from the crowd. Grayson Barrett is a repentant player and self-described "term-paper pimp" trying to distance himself from his crew of baddies and leave his manipulative ways behind. When Wren saves him from choking on a cocktail weenie at a wedding reception held at her family's banquet hall, the Camelot Inn, their lives become a game of Mars vs. Venus. The stereotypical male-female dynamic takes hold: Wren becomes the reformed con artist's "moral compass," and she spends too much time overanalyzing his actions and apparent disses, pretending she doesn't care when he doesn't return her texts. Wren and Grayson share the narration chapter by chapter, and their witty banter moves the story along. Nevertheless, it's still a fairly standard teen love story: Girl and boy from different social circles meet, face obstacles from family and friends, and fall in love. Feminists may recoil, but fans of light romance will discover a satisfying weekend read. (Fiction. 14 & up)
School Library Journal
01/01/2014
Gr 9 Up—Wren, a shy, quiet junior, falls for gorgeous bad-boy Grayson in this enjoyable and sometimes surprising romance. Their initial meeting is less than ideal: he chokes on the pastry-wrapped frankfurters she serves him in her family's Arthurian-themed catering hall. She performs the Heimlich maneuver, and he vomits on her shoes-but it's still love (and lust) at first sight. Wren is struggling to find her place in a family of overachievers. Grayson was kicked out of his private school, where he was involved in a dangerous, criminal enterprise, which he's trying to break away from despite old friends who don't want to let him go. The chapters told from his point of view are not always convincing, as this former player describes his sweet, mushy romantic feelings for Wren, but readers will enjoy seeing how love changes him. There are a few subplots, but the focus is on the whirlwind romance. Misunderstandings, secrets, a jealous classmate, and other obstacles get in the couple's way. The pace of the story picks up around the halfway point as Grayson's past comes back to haunt him. This is a mostly light, often funny story. Grayson sometimes borders on unlikable, but the believable characters speak and behave like teenagers, whether they are drinking and hooking up at parties or worrying about college applications. This is a solid choice for readers who like a little more heft than the average teen romance novel.—Miranda Doyle, Lake Oswego School District, OR
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780062279484
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 12/31/2013
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 160,759
  • Age range: 14 years
  • Product dimensions: 5.60 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 1.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Robin Constantine is the author of The Promise of Amazing. A born-and-raised Jersey girl who moved south so she could wear flip-flops year-round, she spends her days dreaming up stories where love conquers all, eventually, but not without a lot of peril, angst, and the occasional kissing scene.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 17 )
Rating Distribution

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(5)

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(6)

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Sort by: Showing all of 17 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 25, 2015

    It is and it isn't

    Kinda a typical teen romance but not too mushy. Fairly good and realistic if you are in to that sort of thing.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2014

    Promise of Amazing by Robin Constantine Promise of Amazing was

    Promise of Amazing by Robin Constantine

    Promise of Amazing was just that. The writing was so real, I felt like I was spending a girls weekend with my best friend. So much so, that I actually felt like I missed her when I finished the book. I could totally see myself hanging out in the high school lunch room (and beyond) with a girl like Wren and her sidekicks Madison and Jazz. And it was not so long ago that I was trolling for photos in my older brother’s yearbook and spinning tales of love in my head for a guy I just met.

    The “Love at First” sight theme made the book a fun read. It was whimsical in a way, but there was also a struggle so it made it realistic. The characters were flawed. They were not perfect people. And the author gives an authentic portrayal of the two characters dealing with their issues while falling in love.

    The dual point of view was an enjoyable experience for me. I have never read a book with two voices before. I was impressed with how well the author wrote Grayson’s Chapters from a “guys” standpoint. You wouldn’t believe that the writer is actually a girl.

    The characters were very believable, the story was well crafted, and everything tied together at the end. It left me with a feeling of wanting to know what will happen next with Wren and Grayson. Can’t wait for a sequel (hint, hint).

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 26, 2015

    I Also Recommend:

    Has its moments

    Having heard nothing about this, the cover is honestly, adorable. And that title.

    So, I went in, ignoring reviews for this.

    A friendship that leads to something more. All because Wren saves Grayson's life.

    I liked the moments where Wren was working at Camelot, hanging with her best friends, confiding in them, Grayson wanting to get to know Wren and change his ways, character development for the two as the story goes along, etc.

    Oh and later on in the book, they communicate at least. Thanks for that book, made this read, a little better. A little.

    Even though at the beginning, I was like um dude, she just saved your life, and you're already like, I must know who she is. Seemed a little to insta love, or maybe that's the point? I don't know. Even the characters were questioning this. At least he got to know her first, and she him, there's that at least.

    The writing wasn't bad and the story, well it is familiar with most books but I was okay with reading it.

    Anyway, this was an okay in moments kind of read for me. I didn't love it but I didn't hate. I did like it and wonder what the author will write next. And if the cover will be just as adorable?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2014

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 1, 2014

    At first, The Promise of Amazing appears to be a case of good g

    At first, The Promise of Amazing appears to be a case of good girl meets bad boy, but beneath the cutesy cover and it-could-be-fate summary, this book has a lot more going for it. For most people, there is a point in our lives when we realize that something has got to give. There must be a big change, or things are just not going to work out, and the weird thing is that even though most people hit this point, you will ALWAYS have opposition to your change, even if it's a good one. For Wren and Grayson, they both hit that milestone when she saves him from choking on a miniature meat tube encased in a doughy wrap (inside joke. Gotta read the book, folks!). The rest, as the saying goes, is history. Adorable, sexy, convoluted, dangerous, crazypants history.

    By far, one of the aspects of Promise of Amazing is Wren and Grayson's connection. You can turn your nose at it and call it instalove if you wish, but I loved the way these kids couldn't stay away from one another. It wasn't creepy or stalker-esque (but their conversation about that is sooo precious). It was natural, an effect of her heroism combined with really great chemistry. Wren doesn't force Grayson to participate in ridiculous schemes, and Gray draws Wren out of her shell. By the way, it's so weird the way everyone describes Wren as the quiet girl, but honestly, I never saw it because 1. she's one of the narrators, and 2. girlfriend has some serious sass when she puts it out there. Nobody puts Baby Wren in the corner! Anyway, I really appreciate the genuine nature of their relationship, which was apparent even as Grayson was lying his butt off. Or withholding. Whatever. Tomayto, tomahto.

    I also really enjoy the realness of the characters. Grayson, Luke, and Andy are, at times, coarse and crude. Teenagers swear so I'm okay with the language in this book, but I also really appreciate that Robin didn't go over the top with it. It's not like some books of movies when some writers surely must say, "Oops. Dropped an F-bomb. Broke that barrier. Guess I'll drop ALL the F-bombs" and everything devolves into "that effing effer is effed!" No. The language is appropriate for a book about high schooler who do naughty things. I actually found the boys' banter and insults witty, clever, and creative. I definitely laughed out loud several times. Meanwhile, the girls were not prissy and pure. When Wren (wow, that's a terrible combo of words!) gets angry, she's not afraid to let people know it. She's not a delicate little flower who watches her language. When she's pissed, she's pissed, and she sure lets loose. It's a nice touch!

    I do have some complaints about Promise of Amazing. For a book primarily about Grayson and Wren, there are a LOT of supporting characters, and honestly, I would have liked to have seen some of them receive more page time. I felt like certain scenes were cut off too abruptly, and that didn't help. Not sure if that was an intentional writing decision on Robin's part, or if those scene endings were part of the editing process. I would have liked those scenes to transition a bit better. I also wanted a lot more of Wren and Grayson's actual romance. There's all this buildup to getting together and then their fight to stay together, but there was very little of them actually together. I get it; there's also very little conflict in the "together" part of a fictional romance, but c'mon. Throw the readers a bone. Or some more kissing (I realize that is also a very poor combination of sentences, but I'm smiling and giggling so it's staying. I occasionally have the mind & sense of humor as a fifteen year old boy). Finally, I was pretty frustrated with the whole trainwreck of a climax. That confrontation was nothing more than a clusterduck. I wanted to slap Wren and Grayson upside their heads. By the end of it, I was yelling, "WHAT DID YOU EXPECT?!" at my tablet. I mean, there are poor choices like wear those shoes with that dress or forgetting an umbrella, and then there are poor choices like creating a Bling Ring or staging a confrontation with your frenemy at your parents' business. *facepalm*

    All in all, I really enjoyed The Promise of Amazing. It was a quick read, but it was also clever and engaging. I could relate to the characters and sympathize with their problems, even as I wanted to smack them around a little bit for making it worse. But that's life of a reader. The characters always make it worse, and there's not a dang thing we can do to stop them. I find Robin's writing style very appealing, and I really like this as an example of good dual pov. If Robin continues to write novels like The Promise of Amazing, I will continue to read and enjoy them, and I believe many readers will feel the same.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 10, 2014

    Athena cabin

    Simple yet modern looking house with all kinds of cool tech and lots of beanbag chairs. Head conselor: Grace

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 11, 2014

    Jacob u here

    It is jasmin

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 7, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    I say this a lot, but I love reading YA contemporary romance! I

    I say this a lot, but I love reading YA contemporary romance! I consider it my favorite genre because so many of my favorites are contemporaries and many of them can pull me into the story and the romance from cover to cover. The Promise of Amazing, like a lot of other books in this genre, was sweet. However, it didn't hold an "amazing" quality to it. It didn't hold a memorable quality to it, which is one of the biggest reasons why I didn't love it.

    THE POSITIVES, FIRST

    I liked Wren. If I can say I'm proud of a character by the time a book ends, that character is usually a good one. I love to see growth—I don't care how flawed she (or he) is at the beginning of the book. As long as a lesson is learned and a noticeable, positive improvement is made, I'm good. Wren did that. At the end, it was clear that she had grown. 

    I also liked the ending. It was just . . . really sweet. It suited the story, which was also good. I liked reading about Wren and Grayson and the troubles they faced, though I wasn't a fan of Grayson for a long time. It took me awhile for me to warm up to him because he didn't make a great first impression, but by the end of the book, he wasn't so bad. 

    A CASE OF INSTA-LOVE

    Uh-oh. I know—"insta-love" is a big turn-off for many readers, and unfortunately, it was there in this book. It's not usually a big deal for me, as long as it's done well, but Wren and Grayson's connection was just not developed enough at the point where they started being really attracted to each other. I did like them as a couple eventually, but I never did love them because they entered the "I-love-you" stage too quickly for it to feel completely convincing. 

    OVERALL

    The Promise of Amazing wasn't quite amazing. While I did like reading the story, the book didn't stand out. It didn't wow me, but it didn't terribly disappoint me. It was a nice contemporary read and I am glad I got to read it, but it just didn't feel like a memorable read—rather a forgettable one.

    *I received an e-arc of this book from the publisher through Edelweiss in return for an honest review. 

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  • Posted February 6, 2014

    With an absolutely adorable cover and title to match, I went int

    With an absolutely adorable cover and title to match, I went into this story with high hopes. I did notice a few 2- and 3-star reviews before reading it, but I didn’t read the reviews. I’d rather go into a book with an open mind and no preconceived thoughts regarding it. Though this book wasn’t “amazing” as the title would suggest, I did overall enjoy it.

    The Promise of Amazing is told through alternating POV’s. First we have Wren, the “quiet” good girl that feels lost in the hussle and bustle of school life. She’s looking for a change, but doesn’t quite know how to achieve that yet. Compared to her over-achieving brother and sister, Wren is feeling inadequate and doesn’t know what to do with her future. Grayson, on the other hand, is a huge star at his school, good looking, errogant, and outright in love with himself. After getting expelled from his former high school for selling term papers, he’s now in a new school with past mistakes from his past coming back to haunt him.

    The two are extreme opposites. Though I understand the reason for this, the romance between the two was hard for me to grasp. I just didn’t understand what these two saw in each other. Yes, there’s the instant attraction part… but that can only go so far. They were totally in love with each other at first sight. And let me just tell you, “first sight” consisted of Wren staring at the back of Grayson’s head while doing the heimlich on him, saving his life. Not what I would consider the perfect “love at first sight” romantic scene. (Though these silly little things are what I loved most about this story.)

    Insta-love? Yeah, it’s full-fledged in this story. Seriously, insta-love overload. It’s excessive. Though I’m usually a huge hater of insta-love, for some reason I was able to overlook it here and still enjoy the story. Maybe it was my mood? Perhaps because I loved the cover so much and I really wanted to like this story? Or maybe I’m just forgiving? I’m not sure, but for some reason I didn’t really care about it. There was more to the story than the romance.

    Speaking of the romance… it fell flat. Like, pancake flat. I didn’t see the connection these two supposedly had. I just didn’t feel the amazingness that I was hoping to feel. And though I could see why Wren probably liked Grayson at first, (i.e.: the rugged good looks, confident attitude, an edge with a troubled past….) I just didn’t see the overall attraction, even love these two felt for each other. Grayson was appealing on the outside, but the fact that he got into so much trouble in the past, and really didn’t have any plans of making amends for these wrongs, made him anything about appealing to me. I thought Wren should have ran away, and quickly. And as far as Wren goes, yes, she may have been cute and easy on the eyes, but what was it about her performing the heimlich on Grayson that made him fall head-over-heels in love with her instantly?

    The story did pick up a bit after a slower beginning, including quite a bit of realistic teenage drama (which we all love, right? :)), but I didn’t much care for the ending. All in all, The Promise of Amazing wasn’t all I had hoped it would be, but it did keep me entertained and I did enjoy it. And that cover… now THAT’S amazing!


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  • Posted January 12, 2014

    more from this reviewer

        I was drawn right into this one with Wren. I liked her voice

        I was drawn right into this one with Wren. I liked her voice and I related with her. Who is supposed to know that they want to  do with their life in high school? I am almost thirty and I don't know, so I feel for those half my age. But she wasn't whiny, just questioning things, trying to figure out the right steps, and she is the average girl, the good girl, smart but not top of the class, and in this book she journeys to figure out how to leave her mark and the person she wants to become. 
        We also have the dual perspective of Grayson, bad boy, kicked out of private school for selling term papers. But it is a wake up call, and he is struggling to turn over a new leaf, and when he meets Wren its extra incentive. But his old friends and old past doesn't want to let go, so we see the ultimate struggle of the good and not so good within him battling out to win. 
        The romance is great, I love their flirting, the awkwardness, how Wren steps in and saves his life, helping him, and them opening up to one another emotionally. There are some nice hot kissing scenes as well that I really enjoyed. 
        The sets of families from both Wren and Grayson each have their own blend of problems, but in the ordinary way of these days, steparents, older siblings with news that shakes up their lives, but all leaning on and counting on each other at the end of the day, and pushing to be the best. 
        It is a a good balance of funny or awkward and deep conversations and trying to work out life. The pacing is great, and it kept me engaged. I decided to read The Promise of Amazing because of the cover, and Wren spoke to me in the synopsis, and I wasn't disappointed. 
         Although I appreciate a dark past, and trying to overcome it, and I realize that people make real mistakes, I do think that one of the things that Grayson did pushed things too far in my opinion, and I couldn't keep him in as high of regards as in the beginning. 
        I would recommend for a balanced contemporary with a romance that is easy to cheer for once you get past instalove status. 
        I did enjoy Wren's character development, and the romance, no matter how insta-lovey it seems at times.
        The ending wrapped things up pretty well, and I was satisfied where it left our characters, even though they had to go through a lot of hard things, I think they learned from them and will be better for mistakes.  




    Bottom Line: Overall good contemporary.

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  • Posted January 3, 2014

    A realistic romance for teens where the characters are not perfe

    A realistic romance for teens where the characters are not perfect!

    I'm really happy to have fallen on this story, where two very different young people change radically their way of seeing life after meeting each others. 
    Far from being a cliché, I really think sometimes people can grow up with some unexpected encounters that are thrown in their paths. And this is exactly what happens with Wren and Grayson.

    If I may make a little digression, I must confess that the name of the hero made ¿¿me imagine the character of CSI in his lab instead of a teen... Therefore, nothing very glamorous! But that was just in my mind... Sorry for this bad association ... Lol!

    Seriously, this is the story of a perfect girl that lack of rebellion bones who is tasteless and odorless. She wishes to affirm her personality but don't really know how.
    On the other side, a boy who is a bit too wild, closer to be thrown in juvi than being a prince charming, wants to get back in the right track to give meaning to his life. Two young people who will learn to mature. 
    Personally, I like Grayson's character a lot. Especially, his peculiar notion of truth and lies... very personal interpretation...Lol!

    Fun and realistic, the story has not shaken me by its originality but I had a good time.

    Lucie
    newbooksonmyselves.blogspot.fr

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2014

    Amazing! Completely romantic and amazing!

    Amazing!

    Completely romantic and amazing!

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  • Posted December 31, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    ***Review posted on The Eater of Books! blog*** The Promise

    ***Review posted on The Eater of Books! blog***




    The Promise of Amazing by Robin Constantine
    Publisher: Balzer + Bray
    Publication Date: December 31, 2013
    Rating: 2 stars
    Source: eARC from Edelweiss




    Summary (from Goodreads):




    Wren Caswell is average. Ranked in the middle of her class at Sacred Heart, she’s not popular, but not a social misfit. Wren is the quiet, “good” girl who's always done what she's supposed to—only now in her junior year, this passive strategy is backfiring. She wants to change, but doesn’t know how.




    Grayson Barrett was the king of St. Gabe’s. Star of the lacrosse team, top of his class, on a fast track to a brilliant future—until he was expelled for being a “term paper pimp.” Now Gray is in a downward spiral and needs to change, but doesn't know how. 




    One fateful night their paths cross when Wren, working at her family’s Arthurian-themed catering hall, performs the Heimlich on Gray as he chokes on a cocktail weenie, saving his life literally and figuratively. What follows is the complicated, awkward, hilarious, and tender tale of two teens shedding their pasts, figuring out who they are—and falling in love.




    What I Liked:




    I'd say that the beginning, the first part of this novel, was truly the only part that I really enjoyed. You know why? Because Wren and Grayson had not met yet. It wasn't mushy gushy and self-pitying yet. You know what book this one reminded me of? The Infinite Moment of Us, by Lauren Myracle. Go check out my review for that one. You'll notice similarities.




    This book begins by introducing us to each character, separately. This book is split into Wren's perspective, and Grayson's perspective. I like this. Both characters are very unique, and I like that we get to read from both of their perspectives (even if I hated their thought processes). 




    So, basically, Wren is sad because everyone thinks that she average. SHE thinks that she is average. She's quiet, she's not NHS-material, she's not Harvard material... she's just average Wren, feeling sorry for herself, totally defined by her average class rank. Grayson is all mopey because he got kicked out of his fancypants private school because he used to run a term paper business. Or something. Something unethical that had to do with term papers. 




    That's the beginning. Constantine does a great job of characterizing each character. That doesn't mean I liked them or anything. 




    What I Did Not Like:




    I really just want to direct you to my review of The Infinite Moment of Us by Lauren Myracle... but I can't. But seriously, they are so so so similar, and I hated that book. I mean, even the heroine's names are the same. I'm not accusing either author of plagiarism or anything, but I hated The Infinite Moment of Us, and I hated this book.




    I strongly dislike insta-love, and I'm sorry, but this book was a bunch of insta-love BS, in my opinion. Wren saves Grayson via the Heimlich maneuver, and suddenly, both of them are imagining themselves all over each other. I. Hate. This. No. No no no. Insta-love at its finest. You don't decide that the person you saw for like, a minute, is perfect and wonderful and all you can think about. No. Not like that.




    Next thing. Wren is such an airhead, in my opinion. You think you're average, girl? Yep, you're right. You so are. Average in class rank, average in social life, average in intelligence - but seriously. She's so stupid sometimes, I just want to smack her and wake up some of those brain cells. Where are you thinking of applying to school, Wren? I hate when people don't know this. You shouldn't be a junior, or even a senior, and NOT KNOW. You should have some idea of what you're interested in, and some idea of a school to apply to. If you don't, in my opinion, then you're just being lazy. You don't WANT to think about college and degrees and jobs. You're scared of the future, and also, you're lazy. This is my opinion, you all, not cold hard facts or anything. Also, I'm not saying you should have a life plan or anything.




    Grayson is so stupid as well. I mean, why would you put your academic integrity, your record, etc., on the line, for small amounts of money?! I mean, the money really is small, compared to the career you COULD have if you went to a great school and didn't tarnish your record by doing something as disappoint as selling term papers. WHY ARE PEOPLE SO STUPID. And the other thing he did/does. STUPID. IDIOT. I am unforgiving when it comes to these flaws and actions. Just... no.




    I found the whole plot of this book POINTLESS. It's all about the romance. Mushy gushy yucky in-your-face-all-the-time romance. I really don't want to read a book that has the characters thinking about the other CONSTANTLY. Like, that's the only thing each of these two would think about. Wren Wren Wren. Grayson Grayson Grayson. Yuck yuck yuck.




    The other plot - the subplot - deals with Grayson and his dishonest business. Not the term paper one, but another one. You'd think he would have learned his lesson by now, when he got kicked out of his old (fantastic) private school. Wait, excuse me - I mean, he was asked to leave. Whatever.




    Ugh I cannot even finish this. Maybe this one should get one star. Whatever. I really don't like this book. Count me out for contemporary romance novels, at least for some time. 




    Would I Recommend It:




    Ehhh, no. There are better YA contemporary romance novels out there. Heck, there are better contemporary novels out there in general. Don't waste your time on this one. No offense to the author, publisher, etc., but this one was a bit painful.




    Rating:




    1.5 stars -> rounded up to 2 stars. This one wasn't for me, not by a long shot. I can't say I'm completely giving up on YA contemporary romance, but I know it's not my favorite genre. Surprise.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 31, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    I went into this book with really, really high expectations. Wit

    I went into this book with really, really high expectations. With the word "amazing" in the title, can you blame me? With its ridiculously adorable cover and story of an average girl saving a reformed bad boy, I knew I was destined to love this book. In the end, the story was less than amazing and left me feeling rather ambivalent all around. It pains me to say it, too.

    Wren was a sweet girl. I liked her character. Mature for her age, but not really sure what she wanted out of the future, she made for an interesting protagonist. I liked the journey she was taking, I just wish it had been with a different guy. Grayson, honestly, never quite did it for me. I didn't find him to be a particularly likable character. I never truly believed he was sorry for his past transgressions. He was just a spoiled pretty boy that lacked any substance. I failed to ever see a real connection between Wren and Grayson. I didn't feel any chemistry between them. 

    I enjoyed the book mostly because of Wren's growth throughout the story and not for the romance. She started out as naive and a bit of a pushover, but managed to find herself somewhere along the way. She really came into her own. The concept of the story was great and would have been a lot cuter had I actually liked the love interest. But, since I didn't, I can't give this book more than three stars. If you're a fan of young adult contemporary romances, you should give it a try and see if you can appreciate Grayson more than I did. 

    I received a copy of this book from the publisher, via Edelweiss, in exchange for an honest review. 

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    Posted March 7, 2015

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    Posted March 10, 2015

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