The Promised Land: The Great Black Migration and How It Changed America

The Promised Land: The Great Black Migration and How It Changed America

by Nicholas Lemann
     
 

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A New York Times bestseller, the groundbreaking authoritative history of the migration of African-Americans from the rural South to the urban North. A definitive book on American history, The Promised Land is also essential reading for educators and policymakers at both national and local levels.


From the Trade Paperback edition.  See more details below

Overview

A New York Times bestseller, the groundbreaking authoritative history of the migration of African-Americans from the rural South to the urban North. A definitive book on American history, The Promised Land is also essential reading for educators and policymakers at both national and local levels.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
From 1940 to 1970, some five million blacks migrated to the urban North. In a vivid document that spent 10 weeks on PW 's bestseller list and was a BOMC, History Book Club and QPB alternate, Lemann collects personal accounts and refutes the belief that all federal programs to aid the black poor failed. (Apr.)
Library Journal
Focusing on the larger post-1940 complement of the black South-to-North movement--the ``Great Black Migration''--that created New York's Harlem and similar black quarters in every major northern city, Lemann traces the roots of Ameri ca's rotting ghettos. Moving between Clarksdale, Mississippi, Chicago, and the nation's capital with skill, Lemann (a contributing editor at The Atlantic ) particularizes and personalizes in life stories the forces that shifted five million blacks North after 1940 and then trapped most of them and their progeny in poverty. His essay in social causation and consequences rings as a manifesto of public policy for the 1990s with the clear theme that the nation can and must undo what its racism has done. It is highly recommended for all collections on contemporary America. Quality Paperback Book Club alternate.-- Thomas J. Davis, Univ. at Buffalo, N.Y.
C. Woodward
Richly informative…A very engaging narrative…[Lemann] has fulfilled an important and neglected need with skill and devotion, and his book deserves wide attention.
The New York Times Book Review
Garry Wills
Brilliant…indispensable.
The New York Review of Books
From the Publisher
"A compelling and powerful book that should be read by anyone interested in the continuing history of racial oppression and conflict in the United States. Lemann successfully interweaves personal narratives of African-American migrants and their families with the discouraging story of politics and public policy in Chicago and Washington."— David Brion Davis, Yale University
"A fascinating and deeply moving book, a masterpiece of social anthropology. Lemann's account of the political history of the War on Poverty ranks with the very best contemporary history."—David Herbert Donald, Harvard University

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780307764874
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
08/24/2011
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
416
Sales rank:
557,987
File size:
2 MB

What People are saying about this

George F. Will
Nicholas Lemann is America's best writer about America's most vexing problem. This is an instant classic of contemporary history, with the definitive account of how the nation arrived at its current dangerous situation.

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