The Proper Criticism of Some Decent People: A Candid, Unblinking, Unapologetic, Uncompromising Look at the Leadership Crisis in Black America and Its Impact on All of America

Overview

The Proper Criticism of Some Decent People

A Candid, Unblinking, Unapologetic, Uncompromising Look at the Leadership Crisis in Black America and the Impact on the Leadership of America

By

Dr. Theophilus Green

_____________________________________________

"None of us are born with prejudice. It is not a human response or reaction that comes naturally. Yet, it is a practice ...

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Overview

The Proper Criticism of Some Decent People

A Candid, Unblinking, Unapologetic, Uncompromising Look at the Leadership Crisis in Black America and the Impact on the Leadership of America

By

Dr. Theophilus Green

_____________________________________________

"None of us are born with prejudice. It is not a human response or reaction that comes naturally. Yet, it is a practice that has persisted for nearly five hundred years in what is now the United States of America." With those words, Chicago psychologist Dr. Theophilus Green begins an unflinching analysis of virtually every major luminary to influence American civil rights in the last fifty years. With uncommon results:

On O.J. Simpson: L.A. police on the scene may have been confused about the identity of the murderer because blood is red and O.J. is black. But not the psychologists. The reason? They each asked themselves the same question. Who would know Nicole had breast implants, and who would take time to destroy them,-but the guy who paid for them?

On Black women: The fully Americanized black woman is a willful, dominating, colorful, controlling, unique mixture of female. You should read that as a compliment, not an editorial. You should also consider it fair warning.

On Former U.S. Sen. Carol Moseley-Braun:

Ultimately, finally and unfortunately, Sen. Carol Moseley-Braun was always alone. Top the heap, queen of the roost, best seat in the best game in town. She was also the poster woman for every black woman in America. No man, no strong family, no strong support group, surrounded by manipulators, schemers and cons. It's a wonder she survived it at all.

On Rev. Jesse Jackson: It is embarrassing to later discover that Rev. Jackson's real motive for going to Washington to counsel the President may have been the opportunity to go skipping down the hotel halls to play with his own girlfriend, who was unlike Lewinsky, pregnant.

On Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley: Say what you want about the Mayor of Chicago, his abuse of privilege, the under the table contracts, the investigations that never seem to result in indictments. He can't pronounce the language and only plays fair for a fare. But you have to give the man his due. He takes second to no one in raising a man. Stand up and give the family just applause. His son Patrick Daley is a man for all the right reasons. ("Well done, young man, well done.") Well done, indeed.

"Thank you for the monograph. Interesting and Provocative"

Colin Powell

U.S. Secretary of State

"The most important book for every black child in the 21st century."

Elmira Mayes, Founder, Director, Loop Lab School

"I never thought I would ever read a book that would admit that the Catholic church celibacy hypocrisy breeds pedophiles."

Robert Knight, Chairman,

Committee to Seek Redress Justice for Children of Catholic Clergy Sexual Abuse

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781425944483
  • Publisher: AuthorHouse
  • Publication date: 8/11/2006
  • Pages: 284
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.64 (d)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2006

    Proper Criticism A Bold, Rare, Modern Assessment of Black Civil Rights Leaders

    None of us is born with prejudice. With those words, Chicago psychologist Dr. Theophilus Green begins a take-no-prisoners assessment of the Modern Civil Rights struggle, its leaders, its advocates, its political supporters and the impact on the rest of the country. Beginning with a critical assessment of the illegitimate children of the most prominent black civil rights leaders of the past ten years, (â¿¿The known illegitimacies could staff a basketball team, the suspected a football team.â¿ ) Dr. Green raises relevant questions how the personal lives of todayâ¿¿s black leaders have obstructed their goals and accomplishments. Beginning with Rev. Jesse Jackson, â¿¿Who held the seeds of greatness, that never took ground,â¿ Dr. Green has no reservations in confronting how the personal violations of modern civil rights leaders have embarrassed their own familyâ¿¿s dignity. He reports that soul singer Roberta Flackâ¿¿s first psalm to Rev. Jackson was the song, â¿¿Reverend Leeâ¿ in her early album, Chapter Two. Flack croons in that song of a relation with â¿¿Rev. Lee,â¿ â¿¿do it to me,â¿ â¿¿down by the water,â¿ â¿¿do it to me, Rev. Lee.â¿ Dr. Green, a former editor of Ebony and Jet magazines says Flack used the name Lee, because â¿¿it has so many poetic possibilities. Jackson only rhymes with Jackson.â¿ Dr, Green then traces Flackâ¿¿s regret that Jackson wouldnâ¿¿t leave his wife for her in the song, Killing Me Softly, from the album of the same name, which also included the mournful â¿¿Jesse (Thereâ¿¿s a hole in my bed).â¿ Dr. Green contrasts Jacksonâ¿¿s irresponsible person life with his irresponsible public life and raises questions about the estimated more than $300 million Rev. Jacksonâ¿¿s various movements have raised over the past 30 years, ---without ever providing a public accounting. He reports that when Rainbow/Push was employing the mother of his last illegitimate child, whom he introduced to Bill Clinton during the Monica Lewinsky sex-with the-President scandal, she received more than $100,000 a year in salary. When Jackson was legally required to voluntarily contribute, it was less that $40,000. Dr. Green says that Jacksonâ¿¿s only lasting accomplishment of the civil rights movement is a $35 million Budweiser distributorship for Jacksonâ¿¿s sons, â¿¿ but none for those who spent a lifetime working in the industry. Dr. Green asserts that all of Jacksonâ¿¿s other forays into economic equality only benefited Jackson's his girlfriends and friends. â¿¿Very little of that $300 million resulted in lasting economic change for people of his race who did no know him,' says Dr. Green. Dr. Green says Michael Jackson, the King of Pop, has always suffered with his sexuality. He says its obvious to all if you listen to his music. He says Jackson has put his whole life to music. He says 'Billy Jean' was not his girl because he doesn't like girls. He says 'Beat it' was both advertising and instruction. Following a brief affair with Diana Ross during the filming of the movie The Wiz, Michael's broken heart prompted him to write the song, â¿¿Dirty Diana.â¿ Following that heartbreak, he sought plastic surgery to look like Ross, talk like Ross, act like Ross and sing like Ross. It was what Dr. Green suggests, Jackson's first serious emotional psychological breakdown. Dr. Green alleges that because so many people made money off of Jackson, his doctors, his family, his lawyers, and his fans and business partners, no one ever reported his illness or his pedophilia. It takes a while to get used to the running internal commentary of the book. But once you do, its offers a sarcastic biting insight to the criticism. A telling excerpt from the book: 'What happens when you connect a direct current plug into an alternating plug? Exactly! You blow a fuse. Now if Michael did and Diana did and they both did it to each other, Michaelâ¿¿s chaotic life makes perfec

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