The Psychic Life of Abraham Lincoln

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Overview

In dreams, he foresaw his sudden death. He consulted oracles, and at age 22 was told by a seer that he would become President of the United States.

Obscurantists and historians have dismissed Abraham Lincoln's psychic involvements which, in his own time, were profound state secrets. But Lincoln's rise to power coincided with the Great Age of Spiritualism and, as a Mystical ...
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Overview

In dreams, he foresaw his sudden death. He consulted oracles, and at age 22 was told by a seer that he would become President of the United States.

Obscurantists and historians have dismissed Abraham Lincoln's psychic involvements which, in his own time, were profound state secrets. But Lincoln's rise to power coincided with the Great Age of Spiritualism and, as a Mystical Unionist, he felt he was controlled by "some other power."

Trauma and heartbreak opened the psychic door for this otherworldly President, whose precognitive dreams, evil omens, and trancelike states are carefully documented here in this bold yet poignant chronicle of tragic beginnings, White House seances, and paranormal eruptions of the Civil War era.

Aided by the deathbed memoir of his favorite medium, Lincoln's remarkable psychic experiences come to life with communications from beyond, ESP, true and false prophecies, as well as thumbnail sketches of the most influential spiritualists in Lincoln's orbit. Surveying clairvoyant incidents in Lincoln's life from cradle to grave, the book also examines the Emancipation Proclamation and the unseen powers that moved pen to hand for its historic signing into law.

About the Author
SUSAN B. MARTINEZ, Ph.D., is an independent scholar, journalist, and activist who received her doctorate in Anthropology from Columbia University in the 1970s. Raised by agnostic/intellectual parents in Brooklyn, New York, she found her way to Spiritualism in the early 1980s and has since researched and wrote on psychic phenomena, specializing in modern spiritualism in the Victorian era. Currently Book Review Editor at the Academy of Spirituality and Paranormal Studies, she lives in the north Georgia mountains.
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What People Are Saying


In this informative and intriguing book, Dr. Susan Martinez digs deeply into the documented records of Lincoln's involvement with mediums, and sets forth a preponderance of evidence suggesting he was indeed guided by benevolent spirits in his most crucial decisions. --Michael E Tymn, vice president, Academy of Spirituality and Paranormal Studies, and author of The Articulate Dead

Dr. Martinez presents compelling evidence that one of America's greatest and most beloved presidents had been deeply involved in Spiritualism. She deserves the appreciation not only of Lincoln scholars and admirers, but of those who are attempting to enrich and deepen their own spiritual quest. --Stanley Krippner, Ph.D., author and current Alan Watts Professor of Psychology, Saybrook Graduate School and Research Center
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781601630704
  • Publisher: Career Press, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 3/28/2009
  • Pages: 192
  • Sales rank: 1,220,131
  • Product dimensions: 5.70 (w) x 8.60 (h) x 2.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Susan B. Martinez is an independent scholar, journalist, and activist who received her doctorate in Anthropology from Columbia University in the 1970s. Raised by agnostic/intellectual parents in Brooklyn, New York, she found her way to Spiritualism in the early 1980s and has since researched and wrote on psychic phenomena, specializing in modern Spiritualism in the Victorian era. Currently Book Review Editor at the Academy of Spirituality and Paranormal Studies, she lives in the north Georgia mountains.

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Table of Contents

Foreword 15

Prologue 19

Introduction 25

Chapter 1 Out of the Wilderness 35

Chapter 2 "What Next?" 81

Chapter 3 The Trimmer 133

Chapter 4 "O, Why Should the Spirit of Mortal Be Proud?" 175

Chapter 5 "This War Is Killing Me" 195

Chapter 6 Man of Destiny 221

Notes 261

Bibliography 275

Index 281

About the Author 287

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2013

    good stuff

    good stuff

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  • Posted August 31, 2009

    A Waste of Paper

    You know how everyone says it's hard to get published? Well, someone made a major goof here. I've read better high school term papers. I picked up the book thinking it was about the mental life of Abraham Lincoln, but it's about his alleged forays into the occult (from predicting the future or something happening in a different location to dancing pianos). I was willing to explore the topic, but this was a very amateurish attempt at an exploration.
    First rule of writing: never assume your audience knows anything. The author assumes the reader has a fairly extensive knowledge of the attitudes and historical facts around psychic phenomena in the mid 19th century and makes references that are obscure to the general reader.
    Second rule: Tell people what you are going to say, say it and tell them what you just said, but only make a point once. The author takes about a half dozen arguable references to Lincoln's interest in predicting the future, spirit guides and life after death and rehashes them in every chapter from a slightly different angle, but without shedding substantial new light. So basically you read a half dozen versions of the same chapter presented as new chapters.
    Third rule of writing: Stick to the subject. The author wanders around speculating on the involvement of a number of individuals in the Spiritualist Movement, most notably Mary Todd Lincoln, to the extent that the book is hardly about Abraham Lincoln at all. If the author had presented the piece as an essay on the Spiritualist Movement in 19th Century America, it would have been a solid piece - if aimed at the narrow audince of those with a background in that Movement.
    In summation, the author would have been better advised to have spent several chapters familiarizing readers with the Spiritualist Movement, a chapter on the many notables who were involved or interested in the movement and a chapter each on Lincoln's involvement, how his wife influenced him and how the death of his son was an influence. Interesting topic; poor presentation.

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