The Psychology of Learning and Motivation: Skill and Strategy in Memory Use

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Overview

The view of memory use as skilled performance embraces the interactive nature of memory and higher order cognition. In considering the contexts in which memory is used, this book helps to answer such questions as:

• If asked where I live, how do I decide on a street address or city name?
• What influences my selection in a criminal lineup besides actual memory of the perpetrator?
• Why do expert golfers better remember courses they've played than amateur golfers?

Chapters in this volume discuss strategies people use in responding to memory queries- whether and how to access memory and how to translate retrieved products into responses. Coverage includes memory for ongoing events and memory for prospective events-how we remember to do future intended actions. Individual differences in memory skill is explored across people and situations, with special consideration given to the elderly population and how strategies at encoding and retrieval can offset what would otherwise be declining memory.

• An intergrative view of memory, metamemory, judgment and decision-making, and individual differences
• Relevant to both applied concerns and basic research
• Articles written by expert contributors

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Product Details

Meet the Author

Brian H. Ross is a Professor of Psychology and of the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research areas have included problem solving, complex learning, categorization, reasoning, memory, and mathematical modeling. He has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and the Institute of Education Sciences. Ross has been Editor-in-Chief of the journal Memory & Cognition, Chair of the Governing Board of the Psychonomic Society, and co-author of a textbook, Cognitive Psychology. He has held temporary leadership positions on the University of Illinois campus as Department Head of Psychology, Associate Dean of the Sciences, and Dean of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Ross has degrees from Brown University (B.S., Honors in Psychology), Rutgers University (M.S. in Mathematical Statistics), Yale University (M.S. in Psychology), and Stanford University (PhD.). Ross has been Editor of The Psychology of Learning and Motivation since 2000.

Brian H. Ross is a Professor of Psychology and of the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research areas have included problem solving, complex learning, categorization, reasoning, memory, and mathematical modeling. He has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and the Institute of Education Sciences. Ross has been Editor-in-Chief of the journal Memory & Cognition, Chair of the Governing Board of the Psychonomic Society, and co-author of a textbook, Cognitive Psychology. He has held temporary leadership positions on the University of Illinois campus as Department Head of Psychology, Associate Dean of the Sciences, and Dean of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Ross has degrees from Brown University (B.S., Honors in Psychology), Rutgers University (M.S. in Mathematical Statistics), Yale University (M.S. in Psychology), and Stanford University (PhD.). Ross has been Editor of The Psychology of Learning and Motivation since 2000.

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Table of Contents

Chapter 1
The Strategic Regulation of Memory Accuracy and Informativeness
Chapter 2
Response Bias in Recognition Memory
Chapter 3
What Constitutes a Model of Item-Based Memory Decisions?
Chapter 4
Prospective Memory and Metamemory: The Skilled Use of Basic Attentional and Memory Processes
Chapter 5
Memory is More Than Just Remembering: Strategic Control of Encoding, Accessing Memory, and Making Decisions
Chapter 6
The Adaptive and Strategic Use of Memory by Older Adults: Evaluative Processing and Value-Directed Remembering
Chapter 7
Experience is a Double-Edged Sword: A Computational Model of the Encoding/Retrieval Tradeoff with Familiarity
Chapter 8
Towards an Understanding of Individual Differences in Episodic Memory: Modeling the Dynamics of Recognition Memory
Chapter 9
The Role of Long-Term Working Memory in the Structure and Acquisition of Expert Performance

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