The Pueblo Children of the Earth Mother

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The Pueblo Indians of Arizona and New Mexico have retained more of their traditional lifestyle than any other native peoples in North America. For generations, they and their ancestors, the Anasazi, have found peace with the spirits to which they entrust themselves, overcome incredible hardships, tilled the soil as part of a ritual of life, and created ingenious art and architecture. They provide a unique view into an unbroken history. In this first of a two-book chronicle, Thomas Mails recounts that history in ...

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This Brand New Softcover Volume Boasts 522 Pages Devoted To The History And Accomplishments Of The Anasazi And Their Neighbors. The Ancient Anasazi Left No Written Records Tho ... They We Re A Resourceful And Adaptable People Who Evolved In Response To Their Hard Environment. They Developed From Dave And Pit Dwellers To Builders Of Complex Stone And Adobe Villages. They Became Road Builders, Constructed Irrigation Systems, And Created Techniques Of Dry Farming. .The Author Of This Volume Adopts The Archeologists' Approach, Considering In Chronological Fashion, The Most Important O F The More Than 15,000 Sites Of Anasazi Dwellings And Villages That Have Been Found In The Southwest, Revealing The Locations And Archeological Discoveries Uncovered At Each Site In Words, More Than 1 ,000 Drawings, And Color Plates Illustrating The Brilliant And Symbolic Use Of Color That Has Attended The Culture Throughout Its History. 8 X 10". Read more Show Less

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Overview

The Pueblo Indians of Arizona and New Mexico have retained more of their traditional lifestyle than any other native peoples in North America. For generations, they and their ancestors, the Anasazi, have found peace with the spirits to which they entrust themselves, overcome incredible hardships, tilled the soil as part of a ritual of life, and created ingenious art and architecture. They provide a unique view into an unbroken history. In this first of a two-book chronicle, Thomas Mails recounts that history in elegant prose and exquisite drawings and paintings.

Since 1973, Mails has been documenting the traditional customs, rites, and artifacts of Native Americans in his books, paintings, and drawings. Many tribes have adopted him -- in Sioux, his name is Wa-O-Ki Ye, "One Who Helps" -- and it was to Mails that a 105-year-old Hopi elder turned when he wanted to reveal his tribe's ancient prophecies to the world, which Mails did in his 1995 book Hotevilla.

In The Pueblo Children of the Earth Mother, Mails illuminates the fascinating story of the Anasazi and the Pueblo Indians, from their roots in Peru in 2000 B.C., to the first Basketmaker Anasazi of 400 B.C., through the Pueblos of today. For each stage in their development, he describes the influences, homelands, dwellings, adronments, religion, weapons, crafts, food gathering and preparation, educational system, social life, and death rites that have helped form this fascinating and enduring people. Throughout the book, his meticulously rendered illustrations emphasize the brilliant and symbolic color that has attended the culture throughout its long history.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2000

    Samantha's Review of The Pueblo Child

    I have to do a report on Weapons and Hunting of the Southwest Native Americans. I couldn't find anything. Once I found this book, this book was pretty much my whole report.

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