Overview

Accused of conspiring with rebels to steal the throne, Princess Elizabeth is relegated to the Tower of London by her half-sister, Queen Mary. There she finds solace in the arms of a fellow prisoner--her childhood friend, Robert Dudley. Certain their days are numbered, their bond deepens. But they are spared the axe and Elizabeth soon wins the crown, while Robert returns to his wife and the unhappy union he believes cheated him of his destiny to be king. . .

As a daughter of ...

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The Queen's Pleasure

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Overview

Accused of conspiring with rebels to steal the throne, Princess Elizabeth is relegated to the Tower of London by her half-sister, Queen Mary. There she finds solace in the arms of a fellow prisoner--her childhood friend, Robert Dudley. Certain their days are numbered, their bond deepens. But they are spared the axe and Elizabeth soon wins the crown, while Robert returns to his wife and the unhappy union he believes cheated him of his destiny to be king. . .

As a daughter of Henry VIII and the ill-fated Anne Boleyn, Elizabeth knows firsthand the cruelty marriage belies and roundly rejects the many suitors eager to wed the "Virgin Queen"--with the exception of the power-hungry Robert. But her association with him will carry a risk that could shake the very foundations of the House of Tudor. . .

A captivating story of loyalty and betrayal, duty and freedom, The Queen's Pleasure is a fascinating portrait of both the rise of Elizabeth I and one of the most compelling periods in history.

Praise for Brandy Purdy and The Boleyn Wife

"Recommended for readers who can't get enough of the Tudors and have devoured all of Philippa Gregory's books." --Library Journal

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780758279989
  • Publisher: Kensington Publishing Corporation
  • Publication date: 6/26/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 28,560
  • File size: 2 MB

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Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 26, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Told from the POV of Amy Dudley and also Elizabeth I, the reader

    Told from the POV of Amy Dudley and also Elizabeth I, the reader is taken on a touching journey. The beginning has you wondering if the entire story is going to be told from obviously the mind of a very sick and mad woman who has been scorned by her husband. Amy Dudley's cancer has spread and seems to be the cause of her paranoia. The reader doesn't know if this feeling is real or if it is just a dying woman's wild imagination.

    As the story progresses we flash back to happier days when Robert Dudley and Amy first met and instantly fall in love. Even though everyone tells Robert that he is marrying beneath him, the lusty 17-year old wants no one but Amy. Amy is a country girl at heart and not one of the lofty court women. Amy loves to work on the farm and make her jellies. As time goes on and Elizabeth I, Robert's child playmate, takes the throne, Robert sees that his youthful decision was not a wise one and has hurt his ambitions to be great.

    Robert becomes a disgusting character. He is greedy, abusive and narcissistic. He is constantly belittling Amy and embarrassing her in front of others so that everyone's perception of Amy is that she is a country bumpkin. He starts to slowly take everything away from Amy until she has nothing left but her every trusty handmaiden, Pirto. Amy, still thinking, that she has to hold onto Robert, tries to win back his love only to have it thrown in her face. Her attempts at times are hard to read because they are so pathetic and you just want Amy to grow a backbone.

    The reader starts to think of Elizabeth as a home wrecker until her POV comes into play. Robert’s duplicity is shown and how he is playing both women against each other. Elizabeth feels devotion to Robert because of their past but as we all know; Elizabeth swore she would never marry. England was her husband. But once Elizabeth finds out about Roberts lies and betrayals after Amy's mysterious death, the fiery red head gets her revenge for both the deceased Amy and for herself.

    The Queen's Pleasure started out shaky for me but ended with me feeling fulfilled. All that I hoped for came from this lengthy novel of the Elizabeth/Robert Dudley/Amy Dudley triangle. I enjoyed reading the unique writing of Purdy. If you are a lover of Tudor fiction you will be enamored with this version of the story of Elizabeth I and Robert Dudley's rumored affair.

    (ARC was provided for an honest review)

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 22, 2012

    Highly Recommended - Good Read

    This book makes you see Queen Elizabeth I in an entirely different light than other books have portrayed her. She seems to understand the love that Amy Dudley has for her husband, Robert, even though he does not reciprocate Amy's feelings. You see a much kinder side to the Queen and this makes her seem like a woman who can be very caring and tender. I really enjoyed this book and author very much.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 1, 2012

    Beautifully written, the story of two women and the man who woul

    Beautifully written, the story of two women and the man who would try to destroy them both. I loved this book so much, I was muttering at it constantly!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 11, 2013

    Disappointing

    Reading about the Tudors have always been a favorite of mine. I prefer historical fiction, ala, Philippa Gregory. This book, however, was a disappointment. I am surprised the heroine "Amy" didn't expire from drowning rather than cancer, she shed so many tears....it got exasperating! Also, three pages in my nook describing marzipan animals was supposed to be what?....Filler? Way too many pages describing costumes, and does the author really know that much about what they wore? Also, I doubt whether Queen Elizabeth was that silly...sorry I "scanned" through to the end just because I have a "thing" about finishing a book.

    Would not recommend unless the reader likes "Romance Novels", which I do not.

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  • Posted September 2, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    I am still a fairly new devotee of historical fiction and have r

    I am still a fairly new devotee of historical fiction and have read a few books centered in the Tudor era but this is the first book devoted to Queen Elizabeth I and, more especially, Amy Robsart Dudley, a figure much lesser known and written about in history.

    The Queen's Pleasure is really Amy's story, told from her point of view as a young maiden desperately in love with the dashing Robert Dudley, transitioning to a blushing bride and then an unwanted and unloved wife, callously tossed aside for ambition. I loved Amy as presented in the book as much as I was frustrated with her - - although my frustration stems from Robert Dudley's shoddy treatment of her. It was very powerful to see through my reader's eyes the slow tearing down of a sweet, beguiling young girl, made into a fearful and suspicious woman who trusted no one. Even knowing her fate, I still hoped against hope that she would find happiness and the freedom she so richly deserved.

    Sections of the book are also devoted to Elizabeth I and I must admit that in the first chapter or so, outside the beginning of the book, I didn't like Elizabeth and thought her to be as cold and cunning as Robert Dudley himself. However, further chapters showed a more humane and caring woman, a woman desperate to serve her country and learn from her mother's demise. I found Elizabeth to be a bundle of contradictions - - guilt-ridden over her affair with Robert Dudley, but selfish enough to sustain the illicit relationship; claiming to love Robert while admitting that he was a scheming liar who betrayed his wife and, most horribly of all, that he may very well have murdered her or had her murdered. Those contradictions made her a fascinating character, a steely, strong-willed woman who felt she could never marry just a man as she was already married to England.

    Amy and Elizabeth were really two sides of a similar, if not the same, coin. Both were devoted in their own way to Robert Dudley, victims of his ambition. Both wanted nothing more than to be perfect in their expected roles - - Amy as Lady Dudley, Robert's wife and Elizabeth as a ruler to surpass her father. Both these women, as well as all others showcased in The Queen's Pleasure, are so vividly portrayed that I came away from this book feeling as though I had an inside track to Amy's thoughts and author Brandy Purdy took me to sixteenth century England as surely as if I had stepped into a time machine.

    The writing is inviting, intense and flawless, rich with the flavor of English country life as well as court life. The political machinations, the tragedy to befall the Dudley family and the mystery surrounding Amy's death were weaved to captivating detail and the end result is a mesmerizing work of historical fiction that puts Brandy Purdy on my "must read" list.

    I would not hesitate to highly recommend The Queen's Pleasure. It is what historical fiction should be.

    ©Psychotic State Book Reviews, 2012

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 3, 2012

    I really liked this book, and I'm not just saying that because I

    I really liked this book, and I'm not just saying that because I'm a history major and because I love the Tudors. (At least, I don't think I am). I really liked the premise that Purdy went for in this book, which is something that she does, she picks a topic that people ask questions about, but it hasn't widely been done before, like Lady Rochford-the woman who in essence killed Anne Boleyn or Amy Dudley, the wife of Robert Dudley who history mostly forgot.

    I liked that Purdy made me feel something for the characters even if it wasn't a good thing. Robert Dudley was such a prick (excuse my language). The way that he treated Amy was absolutely deplorable! It was so sad to see the way their love started, young and so in love and then to watch the way that it moved toward his hatred of her, and her fighting to hold onto him. He so easily won her and then tired of her because she wasn't a perfect courtly woman.

    Amy's character is so innocent, its heart breaking to see Robert pull away from her and make excuses for why she never came to court. There is only so far that sympathy can go, since after awhile her desperation does get very trying. I admired the way that her devotion and faith in Robert is unwavering until the year before her death. It was sad when she became suspicious of Robert because that was the point that you realized that there was no longer any hope for their love even though as a reader you're aware that he's moved on to Elizabeth.

    Purdy did a great job with imagery in this book. It was easy to picture the ornate dresses that Amy or Elizabeth wore, and all I could do was wish that I could wear such pretty dresses. Although she was a little wordy at times, this book was easy to work through. I love reading Purdy's books and I can't wait to see what she plans on coming out with next.

    To find out more about Brandy Purdy and her method of writing, check back on Thursday for a chance to win your very own copy of The Queen's Pleasure.

    Of note: Brandy Purdy is published under the name Emily Purdy and The Queen's Pleasure is published under the name A Court Affair in England.

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  • Posted June 24, 2012

    You Won't Be Disappointed in this Story!

    Was it murder or suicide or even an accident? Did Robert Dudley murder his 1st wife or order her murdered? Did Amy Robsart Dudley choose suicide as a release from the terrors of breast cancer and her torturous marriage to Robert Dudley? I chose this book to know more of the facts and to imagine the emotions had by Amy and Elizabeth the 1st.

    Brandy Purdy’s “The Queen’s Pleasure” captured me in the beginning pages and did not let go until the end of the Epilogue. The Epilogue was my favorite part. My husband was in another room when I read it and he asked me if anything was wrong!

    The story is told through the voices of Amy Robsart Dudley and Elizabeth 1st. Amy was Robert Dudley, 1st Earl of Leicester’s first wife. They came from very different backgrounds. He was the son of the Duke of Northumberland and Lady Jane Grey. His father has tried to secure the throne for his wife and failed. Robert was at first enchanted with Amy. Amy was from the country and loved nature very much. She didn’t care for jewels or furs or titles, she just wanted a happy life. Then Robert became enamored with Elizabeth 1st or did he?

    I loved the idea of telling the story of Amy’s life through the voices of Amy and Elizabeth 1st and enjoyed the description, songs and poems employed in this story. After reading this book, I felt that I could easily understand Amy’s and Elizabeth’s feelings towards Robert Dudley. This book also gives you an inside to the ravages of breast cancer and the guesses at its treatment in the 1560s.

    Did Robert Dudley truly love Elizabeth the 1st or was it the crown instead? Why Elizabeth 1st did chose England over any marriage? I believe this book answers those questions. What was the true Robert Dudley like? I hated him! You can read this book and see how you feel towards him.

    I really loved this book; it flowed so easily for me and never got boring. I felt that I learned a lot about the relationships of the Amy, Robert Dudley and Elizabeth 1st, feel very fortunate to be living in these times when it comes to medicine. I confess that I have read some negative criticism that complains about the long sentences in this book but since that is the way that I write it felt very natural!

    So I highly recommend this book for anyone interested in historical fiction. I am going to hold on to this book. I look forward to reading more historical fiction from Brandy Purdy.

    I received this book from the author, Brandy Purdy but that in no way influenced my review

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 21, 2012

    The Queen's Pleasure is the fictional account of a real person,

    The Queen's Pleasure is the fictional account of a real person, Amy Robisart. Born in Norfolk, the heiress of farmer Sir John Robsart of Syderstone. She married Robert Dudley just before she turned 18, and they were both young and in love. Amy is best known for her untimely death of suspicious circumstances.
    Lady Jane Grey became Queen and after her rule of a fortnight as England's queen, Robert Dudley was sentenced to death and imprisoned in the Tower of London. At the same time Princess Elizabeth, lifelong friend of Robert Dudley,was also imprisoned in the tower. Robert is eventually freed. With the accession of Elizabeth I to queen, she awarded Robert with the title, Master of the Horse, where he spent most of his time at court. Amy on the other hand was kept away from court which suited her fine at the time. This became increasingly hard on Amy and all she wanted was to spend time with her husband and start a family. Robert had high hopes on becoming King of England and did whatever he could to achieve that goal, including wooing Elizabeth I. As time goes by Amy becomes more and more despondent with the feeling that her husband no longer loves her and her rival is the Queen of England.
    Amy becomes ill with breast cancer and after she dies,there were rumors that Robert wanted her dead and that he had hired someone to poison Amy so he could continue his pursuit of Elizabeth and England. Elizabeth has decided to that she will never marry, including Robert. There different theories as to the what really happened and we all know that Elizabeth I was England's Virgin Queen and that Robert Dudley died without achieving his goal of becoming King and had to live with the rumors that he caused his wife's death.
    I found Amy to be a very tragic figure and Robert to be a cad of the lowest form. Brandy Purdy tells the story of Amy in an intimate and honest way that I found appealing although at times I felt like giving Amy a swift kick in the backside and for her to tell her husband that enough was enough. In Medieval times though, husbands were rarely faithful to their wives and the main reasons for marriage was for their lands, money and property. I did not much like Robert in this book but I felt that in the end his reward was not being able to obtain his goals.
    As with all of Brandy's books, I enjoyed this one very much and highly recommend it to the lover of Tudor history. It is always nice to get a different point of view, even though it is fiction of course.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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