Scars of Mirrodin: The Quest for Karn (Mirrodin Cycle Series #4)

Scars of Mirrodin: The Quest for Karn (Mirrodin Cycle Series #4)

3.0 23
by Robert Wintermute
     
 

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Mirrodin—a world of living metal, an artificial ecosystem created by the Planeswalker Karn to support organic life—is on the cusp of cataclysm. When the Planeswalker Venser goes in search of his former mentor, he learns Karn’s life hangs in the balance—and with him the entire plane of existence. For fans of the mega-selling trading card game,

Overview

Mirrodin—a world of living metal, an artificial ecosystem created by the Planeswalker Karn to support organic life—is on the cusp of cataclysm. When the Planeswalker Venser goes in search of his former mentor, he learns Karn’s life hangs in the balance—and with him the entire plane of existence. For fans of the mega-selling trading card game, Magic: the Gathering®, the full story behind Scars of Mirrodin, a revisitation one of Magic’s most popular settings.


From the Paperback edition.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780786959167
Publisher:
Wizards of the Coast
Publication date:
04/26/2011
Series:
Magic the Gathering: Mirrodin Cycle Series , #4
Sold by:
Penguin Random House Publisher Services
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
304
Sales rank:
395,974
File size:
3 MB

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The Quest for Karn : Scars of Mirrodin Block 3.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 22 reviews.
shisui More than 1 year ago
That is the only explanation I can think of for the quality of this book. People who have been playing Magic over the last year know that the world of Mirrodin was in the middle of an all-out war, but apparently this group does not include Robert Wintermute. Throughout this entire book, our "heroes" (or would it be more appropriate to label them "observers?") walk around the world unfettered by the war that supposedly engulfs the plane. The disconnect between this novel and other established material about the Mirran-Phyrexian war makes this book confusing and frustrating. We have Elspeth, who has personal reasons for fighting the Phyrexians, yet she does nothing to fight them, aside from a few poorly-written and out-of-character outbursts. We also have Koth, a native of Mirrodin who wants to defend his world, yet he does nothing to aid his people, opting instead to leave them alone while he is led around by our third protagonist, Venser. Now, Wintermute's treatment of the character of Venser was probably the most disappointing part of this book. When we first met Venser, he had not yet become a planeswalker, and his abilities were nurtured by Karn and Teferi, two of the most powerful and best-written characters of Magic history. By the end of the Time Spiral storyline, Venser was a promising new planeswalker, and I was very excited to see him return. Instead, Wintermute writes him as a bewildered junkie scrambling for his next fix. We get no sense of why Karn is important to Venser, most likely because Wintermute did not do his research on the characters he was supposed to be writing about. Whenever Venser's past is mentioned, it is riddled with continuity errors, such as blinkmoth serum being available on Dominaria, when the blinkmoth is native to Mirrodin. So eventually these three breeze past every mild opposition that comes their way and find Karn. Venser all of a sudden grows a sense of nobility that wasn't even hinted at previously, and the novel ends with Karn just walking away. Very anticlimactic, but it's expected after reading Wintermute's novel for the Zendikar block, since the same thing happened there. Bottom line: Not a bad book, provided you like descriptions of walking, as well as authors who blatantly disregard continuity and hate good characters. If that's not your thing but you still want to read Magic novels, I suggest the planeswalker novels and the Kamigawa novels.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Let me start by saying, save your time and money. If you are interested in the New Phyrexia story and background, read the "A Planeswalker's Guide to New Phyrexia" on the wizards of the coast site. It is free and does an excellent job covering the entire background and history behind the setting. As for this book itself, it is very disjointed and poorly written. Some characters will suddenly vanish from the story line for chapters at a time only to suddenly re-appear stating that they have always been there. The dialogue is forced and the story itself is very anticlimatic with very little to get excited about or to hold your interest. For much of the story the characters are walking and talking. The book itself also breaks greatly from the information provided about the setting both from with wizards of the coast site and from the Scars of Mirrodin block. It reads like a poorly executed fan fiction with little direction or input from the creative team that designed the setting. I would not recommend this book even if it were free.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Yo this book is AWESOME
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
H
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Blood and gore piled upon blood and gore. A great character turned into an anticlimactic villain. Long descriptions of walking intermingled with a few unrealistic fight scenes. This is what you will find in this book. If Mr. Wintermute ever writes an MTG novel again, I hope he realizes that putting a lot of dead, twisted, disgusting creatures in won't hide the fact that this is terrible writing.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
But it needs more Myrs
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
F it wprst book eva
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
First 50 pages, 2 guys walking and describing the scenery. *yawn* I'm a fan of MTG, and usually love the MTG novels, but this one is not on the level of any of the other I've read. If this was included in a "fatpack", I wouldn't feel so cheated. But I paid money for it, and I do feel cheated.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have read most if the Magic novels. Most are pretty good. But this one was bad. It is very boring. Don't waste your time or your money on this book; try one of the other novels instead.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I enjoy seeing how the writer brings the planeswalkers to life and the contant threat of danger in this book reminds me that Magic the Gathering isnt just a card game: every card has its own story and the way each story can be told is limitless.
Chezzy More than 1 year ago
This book is a great as a tie-in between the sets Mirrodin Beseiged and New Phyrexia, telling the story of three planeswalkers in their quest to find a lost fourth.
weston owen More than 1 year ago
Simply good.amazing plane created in the multiverse not impressed with the mixing of an old gen planeswalker with new ones like to see more importance on there mana and the creatures