The Quest for Security: Protection Without Protectionism and the Challenge of Global Governance

Overview

The essays in this collection boldly confront the quest for security arising from the social, economic, environmental, and political crises and transformations of our century. Joseph E. Stiglitz and Mary Kaldor begin with an expansive, balanced analysis of the global landscape and the factors contributing to the growth of insecurity. Whereas earlier studies have touched on how globalization has increased economic insecurity and how geopolitical changes may have contributed to military insecurity, this volume ...

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The Quest for Security: Protection without Protectionism and the Challenge of Global Governance

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Overview

The essays in this collection boldly confront the quest for security arising from the social, economic, environmental, and political crises and transformations of our century. Joseph E. Stiglitz and Mary Kaldor begin with an expansive, balanced analysis of the global landscape and the factors contributing to the growth of insecurity. Whereas earlier studies have touched on how globalization has increased economic insecurity and how geopolitical changes may have contributed to military insecurity, this volume looks for some common threads: in a globalized world without a global government, with a system of global governance not up to the task, how do we achieve security without looking inward and stepping back from globalization?

In each of their areas of expertise, contributors seek answers to questions about how we achieve protection of those people who are most insecure without resorting to economic, military, or mafia protectionism. Some have suggested that the turmoil in the Eurozone "proves" the deficiencies in the welfare state. This book argues that the superior performance of Scandinavian countries arises from their superior systems of social protection, which allow their citizens to undertake greater risk and more actively participate in globalization. Some suggest that we can address terrorism or transnational crimes through the strengthening of borders or long-distance wars. This book develops the proposition that such approaches have the opposite effect and that only through spreading the human security experienced in well-ordered societies can these dangers be managed.

This book also examines how these global changes play out, not only in the relations among countries and the management of globalization, but at every level of our society, especially in our cities. It explores the potential for cities to ensure personal security, promote political participation, and protect the environment in the face of increasing urbanization.

Columbia University Press

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Somebody should do something about the world’s problems, argues this dreary collection of academic papers. The assembled professors and think-tankers, with George Soros inevitably weighing in, rummage through a grab bag of insecurities that transcend national boundaries—financial crises and trade-induced economic disruptions, greenhouse gases, terrorism, epidemics, “shifting, diffuse and uncertain threats and catastrophes”—and mull half proposals to revamp the U.N., the G20, international conventions, and unspecified cooperative institutions. A few essays stand out, especially Karl Ove Moene’s stimulating analysis of how Scandinavian social democracies embrace global trade while protecting workers; Nobel economist Stiglitz (Making Globalization Work) contributes useful thoughts on climate change—let’s pay people to preserve forests instead of clear-cutting them to grow biofuels. Unfortunately, most of the articles serve up truisms wrapped in droning rumination. Indifferently written, these essays present the mushrooming field of globalization studies in an uninspired light. (Apr.)
Andrew Gamble

This book takes the many and varied challenges facing the world, from the financial crisis to global warming, and explores how new forms of governance and cooperation can be developed to solve some of them or at least mitigate their effects. This book is original and pathbreaking, and its contributors are at the forefront of thinking about these questions.

Tim Buthe

The Quest for Security makes for a fascinating read, made all the more timely by the current outcry -- across the country and beyond -- over the unequal distribution of the pains and gains from the economic changes of recent years. The book examines globalization as the multidimensional phenomenon that it is, without complexifying it to the point where the key issues become obscured. It is an important book that offers both an introduction to key issues in global governance to a general audience and advances the debate among expert scholars and policymakers with serious, constructive proposals for making economic globalization politically sustainable by improving average citizens' economic, physical, and environmental security.

Amartya Sen

Our interdependent but uncoordinated world, in which we are often at loggerheads with each other, generates many different problems. In an insightful collection of contributions led by Mary Kaldor and Joseph E. Stiglitz, this wonderful book offers constructive ways of avoiding disaster with the help of global cooperation. A great book for our time.

Ernesto Zedillo

At a time when most initiatives to reinvigorate the multilateral system and its provision of global public goods are failing, it is encouraging to read the analyses and proposals contained in this volume. The key message of this excellent collection is reassuring: that the governance predicaments posed by globalization are solvable after all; the intellectual battle is not lost and it is still possible, with workable propositions, to win the political one in order to build a better international system. With strong conviction, I buy the argument.

Javier Solana

This important book offers new thinking for exceptional times. It draws fascinating parallels between what is happening in the fields of economics, security, and the environment and demonstrates why and how global solutions are the answer to the current interlinked crises.

George Papandreou

The Quest for Security is one of the most comprehensive assessments of globalization's challenges published to date. From mounting income inequality to the destructive power of climate change to the threat of terrorist attacks, this timely compilation of expert insight deftly exposes where global governance has failed and offers pragmatic solutions for building a secure, sustainable, and just post-crisis world.

Journal of Global Faultlines

This is a near-perfect text for contemporary graduate courses outside any disciplinary 'box.'

Tim Buthe
The Quest for Security makes for a fascinating read, made all the more timely by the current outcry — across the country and beyond — over the unequal distribution of the pains and gains from the economic changes of recent years. The book examines globalization as the multidimensional phenomenon that it is, without complexifying it to the point where the key issues become obscured. It is an important book that offers both an introduction to key issues in global governance to a general audience and advances the debate among expert scholars and policymakers with serious, constructive proposals for making economic globalization politically sustainable by improving average citizens' economic, physical, and environmental security.
Andrew Gamble
This book takes the many and varied challenges facing the world, from the financial crisis to global warming, and explores how new forms of governance and cooperation can be developed to solve some of them or at least mitigate their effects. This book is original and pathbreaking, and its contributors are at the forefront of thinking about these questions.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780231156868
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press
  • Publication date: 4/23/2013
  • Pages: 432
  • Sales rank: 1,158,371
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Joseph E. Stiglitz is a professor and member and former chair of the Committee on Global Thought at Columbia University, and former chief economist and senior vice president of the World Bank. His books include Making Globalization Work; Freefall: America, Free Markets, and the Sinking of the World Economy; and The Price of Inequality: How Today's Divided Society Endangers Our Future. In 2001, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in economics.

Mary Kaldor is professor of global governance and director of the Civil Society and Human Security Research Unit at the London School of Economics. She is the author of many books, including The Ultimate Weapon Is No Weapon: Human Security and the Changing Rules of War and Peace; New and Old Wars: Organized Violence in a Global Era; and Global Civil Society: An Answer to War. Kaldor was a founding member of European Nuclear Disarmament and of the Helsinki Citizen's Assembly. She is also convener of the Human Security Study Group, which reported to Javier Solana.

Columbia University Press

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Table of Contents

AcknowledgmentsEditors' Note

IntroductionMary Kaldor and Joseph E. Stiglitz

Part 1: Social Protection Without Protectionism

Introduction

Chapter 1 Social Protection Without ProtectionismJoseph E. StiglitzChapter 2 Scandinavian Equality: A Prime Example of Protection Without ProtectionismKarl Ove Moene Chapter 3 Further Considerations on Social ProtectionKemal DervisLeif PagrotskyGeorge SorosPart 2: Protection from Violence

IntroductionChapter 4 Global Security Cooperation in the Twenty-First CenturyG. John Ikenberry Chapter 5 Restructuring Global Security for the Twenty-First CenturyMary KaldorChapter 6 Recent Developments in Global Criminal IndustriesMisha Glenny Part 3: Environmental Protection

IntroductionChapter 7 Sharing the Burden of Saving the Planet: Global Social Justice for Sustainable DevelopmentLessons from the Theory of Public FinanceJoseph E. Stiglitz Appendixes to Chapter 7

Chapter 8 Designing the Post-Kyoto Climate RegimeJoseph E. Aldy and Robert N. Stavins Part 4: Urbanizing the Challenges of Global Governance

IntroductionChapter 9 A Focus on Cities Takes Us Beyond Existing Governance FrameworksSaskia Sassen Chapter 10 Violence in the City: Challenges of Global Governance Sophie Body-Gendrot Chapter 11 Cities and Conflict ResolutionTony Travers

Chapter 12 Cities and Global Climate Governance: From Passive Implementers to Active Co-Decision-Makers Kristine Kern and Arthur P. J. MolPart 5: Global Governance

IntroductionChapter 13 Rethinking Global Economic and Social GovernanceJosé Antonio Ocampo

Chapter 14 The G20 and Global GovernanceNgaire WoodsChapter 15 Transforming Global Governance? Structural Deficits and Recent Developments in Security and FinanceDavid Held and Kevin Young

Contributors' Notes

Columbia University Press

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