The Quest of the Holy Grail

The Quest of the Holy Grail

by Ferris Greenslet, Edwin Austin Abbey
     
 

Proofed and corrected from the original edition for enjoyable reading. (Worth every penny spent!)

***

Ferris Greenslet in his work on "The Quest of the Holy Grail" says the Sanc-graal is ultimately derived from the Low Latin term gradalis, signifying a mixing-cup or chalice. "The derivation, Sangraal," he adds, "royal blood, or real blood, is…  See more details below

Overview

Proofed and corrected from the original edition for enjoyable reading. (Worth every penny spent!)

***

Ferris Greenslet in his work on "The Quest of the Holy Grail" says the Sanc-graal is ultimately derived from the Low Latin term gradalis, signifying a mixing-cup or chalice. "The derivation, Sangraal," he adds, "royal blood, or real blood, is specious, but purely whimsical, with no philological authority."

To the Catholic way of thinking, however, this definition is intelligible; for as "The Grail," as Dr. Greenslet elsewhere points out, "became indissolubly linked to the Eucharistic mystery of the Mass," it is highly appropriate, for the chalice contains the wine which is mystically changed to the real blood of our Lord. Greenslet further tells us, "The Grail is fabled to have been the wine cup used at the Last Supper, with which, later on Calvary, one of the Sanhedrin, Joseph of Arimathea, caught the blood flowing from the wounded side and pierced hands and feet of Christ."

The Grail was also considered to be the cup or chalice which contained the wine that Christ blessed and gave to His disciples, saying, "Take and drink ye all of this, for this is the chalice of My blood." In "Parsifal" the priest-knight raises the cup on high and a dove is seen to descend from heaven and rest over it, while the wine sparkles blood-red. It is the action of the priest at the daily Mass who, at the elevation, raises the chalice, and faith teaches us that the wine is changed into the blood of Him who shed it for our sins on Calvary's height. As the paten at the Mass and the chalice bear a close relation to each other, the Grail may have been at different times considered either a dish or a cup, though this is purely a matter of conjecture.

"The Quest of the Holy Grail" is an illustrated monograph originally issued by Messrs. Curtis & Cameron (publishers), and treating the Grail legend with special reference to Edwin Austin Abbey's wallpaintings in the Boston Public Library. Ferris Greenslet, the author of the text, introduces his interpretations of Mr. Abbey's friezes with three chapters of wider scope. These discuss the symbolism of the Grail, trace the growth of the legend through old romances and modern poems, and finally explain how it is treated by illustrator Edwin Austen Abbey. Fifteen short chapters follow, each narrating the incident which is the subject of one frieze panel. All of the fifteen panels are reproduced in full-page illustrations; and there are, besides, eleven very interesting studies of detail.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940013206403
Publisher:
OGB
Publication date:
10/24/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
2 MB

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