The Quick Guide to Wild Edible Plants: Easy to Pick, Easy to Prepare [NOOK Book]

Overview

A recent rise in the popularity of urban farming, farmers’ markets, and foraging from nature means more people are looking for information about plants. In The Quick Guide to Wild Edible Plants, botanists Lytton John Musselman and Harold J. Wiggins coach you on how to safely identify, gather, and prepare delicious dishes from readily available plants—and clearly indicate which ones to avoid.

More than 200 color illustrations, accompanied by detailed descriptions, will help you ...

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The Quick Guide to Wild Edible Plants: Easy to Pick, Easy to Prepare

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Overview

A recent rise in the popularity of urban farming, farmers’ markets, and foraging from nature means more people are looking for information about plants. In The Quick Guide to Wild Edible Plants, botanists Lytton John Musselman and Harold J. Wiggins coach you on how to safely identify, gather, and prepare delicious dishes from readily available plants—and clearly indicate which ones to avoid.

More than 200 color illustrations, accompanied by detailed descriptions, will help you recognize edible plants such as nettles, daylilies, panic grass, and tearthumbs. For decades, Musselman and Wiggins have taught courses on how to prepare local plants, and their field-to-table recipes require only a few easily found ingredients. They offer instructions for making garlic powder out of field garlic and turning acorns into flour for Rappahannock Acorn Cakes. To toast your new skill, they even include recipes for cordials.

The Quick Guide to Wild Edible Plants is a great gift for the beginning naturalist or the perfect addition to every serious forager’s library.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
While ancient humans foraged to survive, today we often forage for less urgent reasons: fun, curiosity, or cost savings. Musselman (biological sciences, Old Dominion Univ.) and environmental scientist Wiggins (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers) have written a concise, useful guide to help modern-day foragers identify, gather, and prepare edible plants. The book features 31 native and introduced wild plants commonly found in the U.S. Middle Atlantic and Northeast regions. Included are plants with edible greens, roots, grains, flowers, and more. Mushrooms, although not plants, are also included. All plants and fungi presented are common, easy to identify, and have no toxic look-alikes. Safety tips are nonetheless provided for avoiding poisonous species. Each brief entry includes common and botanical names, a description of the plant (or mushroom) and its habitat, photographs to aid identification, and instructions for collecting. The book also has a few very basic recipes. VERDICT Readers who live or travel in the regions covered and have adventurous palates will want to have this book with them in their daypacks. Those in other regions should consider one of the many other books on foraging, including Ellen Zachos's Backyard Foraging, reviewed below.—Janet Crum, City of Hope Lib., Duarte, CA
Publishers Weekly
05/06/2013
This short but informative guide introduces readers to a small but intriguing variety of forageable edibles, beginning, wisely, with detailed descriptions and pictures of poisonous plants to avoid. Musselman, a botany professor, and Wiggins, an environmental scientist with the Army Corps of Engineers, have chosen plants that “are easy to identify and do not have any toxic look-alikes.” These include widely known tasties such as blueberries; flora that may be familiar in landscaping or as weeds but perhaps not as food, such as daylily, oak, red spruce, dock, and kudzu; less-known edibles like glasswort and nutsedge; and fungi. Descriptions include historical, botanical, collecting, and preparation information, as well as possible health benefits. The authors have put considerable work into discovering plants with enough edible content to make them worthwhile to collect and eat. As they admit, however, “Concocting these recipes drew upon our passion for plants more than our culinary expertise.” Although Boy Scout– and Girl Scout–types may enjoy the bare-bones recipes, slow- and wild-food aficionados may need to follow the authors’ advice to “use your own imagination in crafting recipes.” 116 color illus. (June)
The Aiken Standard - Whit Gibbons

The fact that as many as 50 books explain how to find, collect, and prepare wild plants for a meal speaks to the popularity of the endeavor. Whether this is your passion or merely something you might be interested in learning about, check out The Quick Guide to Wild Edible Plants... Should I ever get a craving for stinging nettle omelet or black locust fritters, I will know exactly which wild edible plant book to look in.

Portland Book Review - Jane Manaster

The book is witty and full of commonsense. It is a jolly good read for anyone.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781421408729
  • Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
  • Publication date: 5/24/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 144
  • Sales rank: 860,544
  • File size: 17 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Lytton John Musselman is the Mary Payne Hogan Professor of Botany in the Department of Biological Sciences at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. He is coeditor and author of several books, including Plants of the Chesapeake Bay: A Guide to Wildflowers, Grasses, Aquatic Vegetation, Trees, Shrubs, and Other Flora, also published by Johns Hopkins. Harold J. Wiggins is an environmental scientist with the Regulatory Program, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. He is cofounder of the Fredericksburg chapter of the Virginia Native Plant Society and is the author of three books, including Virginia Native Plants.

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