The Quiet Room: A Journey Out of the Torment of Madness

The Quiet Room: A Journey Out of the Torment of Madness

4.4 57
by Lori Schiller, Amanda Bennett
     
 

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At seventeen Lori Schiller was the perfect child — the only daughter of an affluent, close-knit family. Six years later she made her first suicide attempt, then wandered the streets of New York City dressed in ragged clothes, tormenting voices crying out in her mind. Lori Schiller had entered the horrifying world of full-blown schizophrenia. She began an

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Overview

At seventeen Lori Schiller was the perfect child — the only daughter of an affluent, close-knit family. Six years later she made her first suicide attempt, then wandered the streets of New York City dressed in ragged clothes, tormenting voices crying out in her mind. Lori Schiller had entered the horrifying world of full-blown schizophrenia. She began an ordeal of hospitalizations, halfway houses, relapses, more suicide attempts, and constant, withering despair. But against all odds, she survived. Now in this personal account, she tells how she did it, taking us not only into her own shattered world, but drawing on the words of the doctors who treated her and family members who suffered with her.

In this new edition, Lori Schiller recounts the dramatic years following the original publication — a period involving addiction, relapse, and ultimately, love and recovery.

Moving, harrowing, and ultimately uplifting, THE QUIET ROOM is a classic testimony to the ravages of mental illness and the power of perserverance and courage.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Schiller, raised in a loving, affluent family in a New York City suburb, was 17 when she first heard the ``voices'' that would take over her life. Willing herself to appear normal, she resisted the brutally disparaging voices that urged her towards violence and suicide, and she succeeded in graduating from college. But early in 1982, at age 23 and after a suicide attempt, she was persuaded by her parents to admit herself to a mental hospital. For the next seven years, Schiller's auditory hallucinations worsened, and she repeatedly attempted suicide. Diagnosed with schizo-affective disorder, she underwent shock therapy and was treated with antipsychotic drugs. As the symptoms of her disease waxed and waned, Schiller was in and out of hospitals and treatment programs; her weight soared and she became dependent on cocaine. Entering a program at New York Hospital, she suggested to her therapist that she try a new drug, clozapine, which gradually helped her to cope with her illness. Schiller now works at a halfway house. With Wall Street Journal reporter Bennett, she presents her stunning story of courage, persistence and hope. (July)
Library Journal
Diagnosed as schizophrenic at age 23, Schiller spent the next seven years in and out of mental institutions. This account draws upon her diaries as well as interviews with her family, friends, and doctors. A 100,000-copy first printing.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780446671330
Publisher:
Grand Central Publishing
Publication date:
01/28/1996
Pages:
288
Sales rank:
75,943
Product dimensions:
5.25(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.87(d)

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The Quiet Room: A Journey Out of the Torment of Madness 4.4 out of 5 based on 1 ratings. 57 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am a college student studying sociology with a concentration on Human Services. I was just amazed by reading this book. I learned a great deal--Lori took us into her world and it made you feel as if you were in her shoes. The clarity of the book was amazing that even a child can read it. I really enjoyed this book. If you want to know more about this disease read this wonderful book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is for the inconsiderate person who doesn't deserve to read this book: Step outside the circle. People write reviews of books for the Authors and for fellow book lovers who come to discuss literature - not personal issues they have with UPS. Accidents happen all the time and I am sorry you felt it necessary to give a one star review to a sick woman who wrote a brave account of one of the most horrible illnesses a person can suffer from - all because you were late in getting a copy. Shame on you. Find better ways to spend your time.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read this book for a graduate school assignment, but found it very compelling. If you want to know what psychosis feels like Lori Schiller describes it very well. The book gave me a tremendous amount of insight into the inner workings of the schizophrenic mind. I highly recommend it to anyone.
nemojoel More than 1 year ago
I think this book gives great insight into ones struggle with mental illness. However, what I liked about this versus some other books on mental illness is the representation of several different experiences of the same situation, from family members, friends, and doctors.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book gave me an inner view of schizophrenia like nothing else has. I felt her pain, frustration, hope, disappointment and joy. Her family, friends and doctors wrote chapters too so you get a sense of how they felt. It was an emotional roller-coaster that helped me understand how this illness is different from depression, which I understand. Even better, it was fun to read, fast paced and so interesting.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm 15 years old and I have been studying psychology for about 2 years. I have found that people with mental illnesses are misunderstood a great deal. This book gives you a jouney through the mind of a paranoid schizophrenic, which is, perhaps one of the most misunderstood and most made-fun-of illnesses. It shows that Lori is a normal person who developes schizophrenia and fails to deal with it on her own. She lives through several suicide attempts. She denies that anything is wrong with her. She also goes through several psychward admissions and has a bout with drugs. Unlike a lot of stories like this, it has a happy ending. It is a great book, I'm reading it for the second time. I think that everyone who has ever really misunderstood a person with a mental illness should read this.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is an amazing account of a woman struggling with schizophrenia. I work in psychiatric hospital on a unit with mostly schizophrenic patients, and this book helped me so much in understanding my patients and truly empathizing with them.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Informative, eye opening, inspiring. Everything from her experiences to all the love her friends and family have for her is truly touching to read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Anyone who is in the human services field should read this book. You will learn so much about the disease and will definetely benefit from Lori's story.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I could not belive the feeling I received as I read this book to myself. It was absolutely amazing. I literally felt myself in her shoes as she took me into her life. As the others spoke about her illness, I felt myself in their shoes as well. Having read this book has made me want to meet LORI and hug her. I am so proud of her and I don't even know her. Well, I guess I do know her now. I hope everyone gets to read this book at least once.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book, along with 'The Eden Express', is one of the best accounts of schizophrenia. The quality of writing is extremely high, the story is told with good pace, and the ending is hopeful. Lori's description of schizophrenia itself- the disorienting and downright frightening aspects of the disease- is one of the best accounts of the disease that I have read. It's comforting to think that the treatment of this disease has improved substantially since the 1980s due to the advent of the atypical antipsychotics, but I have my doubts as to whether these newer medications are really all that effective. Overall, this book is excellent and should be read by anyone interested in schizophrenia or mental illness in general.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am currently going to IUP and had to read 'The Quiet Room' for my psychology class. I am a Psychology major and I have enjoyed this book, it is very interesting and descriptive with everything that she goes through throughout her life...Great Book! Colin
Guest More than 1 year ago
Whether you suffer from this disease, know someone who does or are just interested in learning about 'Schizophrenia' this book is a must have. This is one of those books that you can't put down.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was on my health list, but I read it for entertainment. It is a great book that taught me a lot about mental illness and life in general. It especially meant a lot to me because I live in the town where she grew up and I've been to the store she works at. I liked how it was written from the views of many people involved.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A unique and fascinating story. Lori Schiller brought the disease of schizophrenia to light. This was a spellbinding account that I could not put down.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book helped me to understand the extreme emotional and physical torture a schizophrenic endures. Part of it being an artifact of the disease and part from the mental health system. It also provides insight to the dark recesses of the human mind where, if unchecked, is allowed to obsess, twist and exagerrate every emotion into it's most hideous form. I found the Voices most horrifying. The thought of not being able to control a loud audience of voices in your head that commands your every move is tough to imagine.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Amazing!! Related to Schizophrenia in ways I could have never before. So completely touching.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Sigh. Thankyou."
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KristinR More than 1 year ago
Wow! Wonderful and compelling insight into Mental Illness.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago