The Rain Stomper by Boswell Addie, Eric Velasquez |, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
The Rain Stomper

The Rain Stomper

by Boswell Addie, Eric Velasquez
     
 
Today is the day of the big neighborhood parade. Baton twirler Jazmin is ready to lead the way for the dogs and kids, music and fun. But then the clouds crowd in. The sky darkens. Thunder roars. And the rain begins. SLAP clatter clatter SLAP SLAP! Is Jazmin’s parade ruined? Or can she use her spirit, her fearless energy, and her mighty baton to save the day?

Overview

Today is the day of the big neighborhood parade. Baton twirler Jazmin is ready to lead the way for the dogs and kids, music and fun. But then the clouds crowd in. The sky darkens. Thunder roars. And the rain begins. SLAP clatter clatter SLAP SLAP! Is Jazmin’s parade ruined? Or can she use her spirit, her fearless energy, and her mighty baton to save the day? Award-winning illustrator Eric Velasquez’s artwork in oil paint on watercolor paper is a perfect complement to debut author Addie Boswell’s lyrical, rhythmic words.

Editorial Reviews

Horn Book Guide
Jazmin, an energetic young baton-twirler, doesn't let a rainstorm stop her community's parade from going forward. Boswell's onomatopoeic text begs to be read aloud ("clatter clatter SLAP!' "splish splish WHACK!"). Velasquez's illustrations of Jazmin with braids flying and legs leaping high show the girl's determination to bring a little sunshine to her neighborhood.
Children's Literature - Beverley Fahey
On the day of the big parade, Jazmin jumps out of bed, twirls her baton,. and dresses in a sporty red suit. She is ready. Thunder rumbles, black clouds fill the sky, and the rain comes down. How dare it rain on her parade! While the rain goes "slap clatter clatter slap!" and the thunder rattles "Boom walla Boom BOOM!" Jazmin begins her rant against the rain. Paneled illustrations and words filled with onomatopoeic verve show the spirited Jazmin's exuberant dance against the rain. With each stomp and splash bigger and more emphatic than the previous, Jazmin chases the clouds and rain away and with her friends joining in the fun, they manage to out-stomp the rain in time for the parade. Handsome oil paintings that fill the pages are full of energy, and Jazmin's bright red suit is a stand out against the gloomy gray backdrop of a rainy day. Short pithy sentences sum up the weather that Jazmin refuses to allow change her mood. To get the full effect, this is best read aloud and kids will eagerly join in the refrain. Warning: it is impossible to read this sitting down so be prepared to stomp around with Jazmin and bang a few pots for effect. It will be fun. Jazmin is one vivacious girl and no amount of rain can keep her or the reader down. Reviewer: Beverley Fahey
School Library Journal

K-Gr 3

It's the first day of spring and Jazmin, dressed in red and twirling her baton, is all set to lead the neighborhood parade. She flings the door open and encounters a big problem: the weather. Wind and thunder are followed by rain: "Slap! Rain poured down in buckets." Thus begins Jazmin's tale of disappointment and frustration as she waits for the storm to stop. "Mud Puddler...Cloud Crasher...Parade Wrecker," she complains as the rain roars, crashes, and bellows. Mounting frustration leads Jazmin to step outside and shake her fists at the rain and stomp her feet. But frustration gives way to fun as she kicks and chases the rain down the sidewalk: "I am Jazmin, the Rain Stomper!" Other youngsters come outside to watch; they urge her on, laughing and clapping. By the time Jazmin has finished, the sun has come out and the cheering children end up having their parade after all. "And so it was that Jazmin, the Rain Stomper...outstomped the rain." Velasquez's large oils impart a sense of the girl's disappointment as well as the feel of a driving rain and eventual pleasure. Large letters in white, black, or red and in different sizes emphasize the sounds and rhythm of the rain and thunder ("BOOM walla BOOM BOOM!"; "clink, clink WHOOSH!"). A delightful read-aloud that deals with making the best of a disappointing situation.-Mary N. Oluonye, Shaker Heights Public Library, OH

Kirkus Reviews
It's the first day of spring, and Jazmin can't wait for the big parade. Donning her new uniform, the young majorette twirls her baton, but as she steps outside, the wind whistles, thunder rumbles and rain begins to pour. The storm sends a disheartened Jazmin back inside to mope and wait. But the rain begins to reveal a rhythm: "TAP / tippity / TAP / TAP." Boswell intersperses a series of onomatopoeic words throughout the narrative to turn the falling drops into the percussive beat of a marching drum: "BOOM / walla / BOOM BOOM." Jazmin, feeling the rain's euphonious call, stomps and splashes her way into the street until she's spinning and skipping to the falling rain. Velasquez stretches his photographic reference to create hyperrealistic perspectives, effectively capturing Jazmin's defiant dance. Words slap against the city sidewalk, as text flows into images and the artwork's lines stream across the page. While there may be too many "TAT / rattle / rattle / TAT"-type sequences, Boswell nevertheless shows how the spirit can overcome a rained-on parade. (Picture book. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780761453932
Publisher:
Amazon Childrens Publishing
Publication date:
12/28/2008
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
731,910
Product dimensions:
8.80(w) x 11.20(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
AD270L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >