×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

THE RAINBOW (100 Greatest Novels of the Twentieth Century Collection) BY D.H. LAWRENCE Banned for Over 10 Years [Nook] The Rainbow by DH Lawrence Acclaimed Author of Sons and Lovers, Lady Chatterley's Lover, Women in Love NOOKbook Special Edition
     

THE RAINBOW (100 Greatest Novels of the Twentieth Century Collection) BY D.H. LAWRENCE Banned for Over 10 Years [Nook] The Rainbow by DH Lawrence Acclaimed Author of Sons and Lovers, Lady Chatterley's Lover, Women in Love NOOKbook Special Edition

by D. H. Lawrence
 
THE RAINBOW
(100 Greatest Novels of the Twentieth Century Collection)
BY D.H. LAWRENCE

Banned for Over 10 Years
[Nook]

The Rainbow by DH Lawrence
Acclaimed Author of Sons and Lovers, Lady Chatterley's Lover, Women in Love

NOOKbook Special Edition


ABOUT THE NOVEL

The Rainbow is a 1915 novel by

Overview

THE RAINBOW
(100 Greatest Novels of the Twentieth Century Collection)
BY D.H. LAWRENCE

Banned for Over 10 Years
[Nook]

The Rainbow by DH Lawrence
Acclaimed Author of Sons and Lovers, Lady Chatterley's Lover, Women in Love

NOOKbook Special Edition


ABOUT THE NOVEL

The Rainbow is a 1915 novel by British author D. H. Lawrence. It follows three generations of the Brangwen family living in Nottinghamshire, particularly focusing on the sexual dynamics of, and relations between, the characters.

Lawrence's frank treatment of sexual desire and the power it plays within relationships as a natural and even spiritual force of life, though perhaps tame by modern standards, caused The Rainbow to be prosecuted in an obscenity trial in late 1915, as a result of which all copies were seized and burnt. After this ban it was unavailable in Britain for 11 years, although editions were available in the USA.
The Rainbow was followed by a sequel in 1920, Women in Love. Although Lawrence conceived of the two novels as one, considering the titles The Sisters and The Wedding Ring for the work, they were published as two separate novels at the urging of his publisher. However, after the negative public reception of The Rainbow, Lawrence's publisher opted out of publishing the sequel. This is the cause of the five-year gap between the two novels.

In 1989, the novel was adapted into the UK film The Rainbow, directed by Ken Russell who also directed the 1969 adaptation Women in Love. In 1988, the BBC produced a television adaptation directed by Stuart Burge with Imogen Stubbs in the role of Ursula Brangwen.

In 1998, the Modern Library ranked The Rainbow 48th on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century.


EXCERPT

"The expression of his eyes changed, became less impersonal, as if he were looking almost at her, for the truth of her. Steady and intent and eternal they were, as if they would never change. They seemed to fix and to resolve her. She quivered, feeling herself created, will-less, lapsing into him, into a common will with him.

"You want me?" she said.

A pallor came over his face.

"Yes," he said.

Still there was no response and silence.

"No," she said, not of herself. "No, I don't know."

He felt the tension breaking up in him, his fists slackened, he was unable to move. He stood there looking at her, helpless in his vague collapse. For the moment she had become unreal to him. Then he saw her come to him, curiously direct and as if without movement, in a sudden flow. She put her hand to his coat.

"Yes I want to," she said, impersonally, looking at him with wide, candid, newly-opened eyes, opened now with supreme truth. He went very white as he stood, and did not move, only his eyes were held by hers, and he suffered. She seemed to see him with her newly-opened, wide eyes, almost of a child, and with a strange movement, that was agony to him, she reached slowly forward her dark face and her breast to him, with a slow insinuation of a kiss that made something break in his brain, and it was darkness over him for a few moments.

He had her in his arms, and, obliterated, was kissing her. And it was sheer, bleached agony to him, to break away from himself. She was there so small and light and accepting in his arms, like a child, and yet with such an insinuation of embrace, of infinite embrace, that he could not bear it, he could not stand.

He turned and looked for a chair, and keeping her still in his arms, sat down with her close to him, to his breast. Then, for a few seconds, he went utterly to sleep, asleep and sealed in the darkest sleep, utter, extreme oblivion."

Product Details

BN ID:
2940013087132
Publisher:
100 Greatest Novels of the Twentieth Century
Publication date:
08/21/2011
Series:
100 Greatest Novels of the Twentieth Century , #1
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
501 KB

Meet the Author

David Herbert Richards Lawrence (11 September 1885 – 2 March 1930) was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, literary critic and painter. His collected works represent an extended reflection upon the dehumanising effects of modernity and industrialisation. In them, Lawrence confronts issues relating to emotional health and vitality, spontaneity, and instinct.

Lawrence's opinions earned him many enemies and he endured official persecution, censorship, and misrepresentation of his creative work throughout the second half of his life, much of which he spent in a voluntary exile he called his "savage pilgrimage." At the time of his death, his public reputation was that of a pornographer who had wasted his considerable talents. E. M. Forster, in an obituary notice, challenged this widely held view, describing him as, "The greatest imaginative novelist of our generation." Later, the influential Cambridge critic F. R. Leavis championed both his artistic integrity and his moral seriousness, placing much of Lawrence's fiction within the canonical "great tradition" of the English novel. Lawrence is now valued by many as a visionary thinker and significant representative of modernism in English literature.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
September 11, 1885
Date of Death:
March 2, 1930
Place of Birth:
Eastwood, Nottinghamshire, England
Place of Death:
Vence, France
Education:
Nottingham University College, teacher training certificate, 1908

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews