The Red Pencil

The Red Pencil

4.5 2
by Andrea Davis Pinkney, Shane W. Evans
     
 

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"Amira, look at me," Muma insists.She collects both my hands in hers."The Janjaweed attack without warning.If ever they come-- run."
Finally, Amira is twelve. Old enough to wear a toob, old enough for new responsibilities. And maybe old enough to go to school in Nyala-- Amira's one true dream.
But life inSee more details below

Overview

"Amira, look at me," Muma insists.She collects both my hands in hers."The Janjaweed attack without warning.If ever they come-- run."
Finally, Amira is twelve. Old enough to wear a toob, old enough for new responsibilities. And maybe old enough to go to school in Nyala-- Amira's one true dream.
But life in her peaceful Sudanese village is shattered when the Janjaweed arrive. The terrifying attackers ravage the town and unleash unspeakable horrors. After she loses nearly everything, Amira needs to dig deep within herself to find the strength to make the long journey-- on foot-- to safety at a refugee camp. Her days are tough at the camp, until the gift of a simple red pencil opens her mind-- and all kinds of possibilities.
New York Times bestselling and Coretta Scott King Award-winning author Andrea Davis Pinkney's powerful verse and Coretta Scott King Award-winning artist Shane W. Evans's breathtaking illustrations combine to tell an inspiring tale of one girl's triumph against all odds.

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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
★ 07/01/2014
Gr 5–7—Set during the early years of the Darfur conflict, this stunning collaboration between Coretta Scott King Award winners Pinkney and Evans tells a moving story of the scarring effects of war but also brings a message of hope and inspiration. Twelve-year-old Amira wishes to attend school, but her mother, "born into a flock of women/locked in a hut of tradition," does not support the girl's aspirations and expects her to only marry and bear children. In contrast, Amira's father praises her talents and gifts her with a special "turning-twelve twig" that she uses to sketch her dreams in the goz (sand). These dreams are brutally shattered when the Janjaweed militants invade and cut a swath of terror through her village. After enduring a heartbreaking loss, Amira and her family must rally their strength in order to make the treacherous journey to the Kalma refugee camp. There, the girl is given a red pencil; this simple gift reveals a world of endless possibilities and imbues the tween with a strong sense of agency. Amira's thoughts and drawings are vividly brought to life through Pinkney's lyrical verse and Evans's lucid line illustrations, which infuse the narrative with emotional intensity. An engaging author note provides background on the political situation in Sudan and explains the powerful motivations for telling this story. An essential purchase that pairs well with Sylvia Whitman's The Milk of Birds (S. & S., 2013).—Lalitha Nataraj, Escondido Public Library, CA
The New York Times Book Review - Monica Edinger
Pinkney's spare verse powerfully communicates this strong young girl's hopes and dreams even as she expresses the awfulness of what she has been through: "Words, / liked tugged teeth. / Yanked / from every part of me." Scattered through the elegantly designed book are Shane W. Evans's soft gray illustrations, perfectly supporting Pinkney's text, evoking the sense that they were done by Amira herself.
Publishers Weekly
★ 08/04/2014
Told in free verse and set in the South Darfur region of Sudan in 2003 and 2004, this potent novel from Pinkney (Hand in Hand: Ten Black Men Who Changed America) is built around the distinctive voice and drawings of 12-year-old narrator Amira. The first half of the novel examines Amira’s life in her rural village, where she helps out with farm chores, wishes she could attend school, and has a close relationship with her father, Dando, who “sees what is possible in me.” After Janjaweed militants invade, inflicting great loss, Amira flees to a refugee camp, where she expresses her creativity through art, after a teacher gives her the pencil of the title. Evans’s (We March) loosely drawn and deeply affecting line illustrations heighten Amira’s emotional reality; in one image, accompanying the poem “Shock,” a simple figure surrounded by a violently scribbled border demonstrates Amira’s despair: “My whole heart./ A sudden break./ My Bright,/ turned black.” Pinkney faces war’s horrors head on, yet also conveys a sense of hope and promise. Ages 9–up. Agent: Rebecca Sherman, Writers House. (Sept.)
From the Publisher
Praise for The Red Pencil:

* "Pinkney faces war's horrors head on, yet also conveys a sense of hope and promise."

Publishers Weekly

* "Pinkney uses deft strokes to create engaging characters through the poetry of their observations and the poignancy of their circumstances... A soulful story that captures the magic of possibility, even in difficult times."—Kirkus Reviews

* "Amira's thoughts and drawings are vividly brought to life through Pinkney's lyrical verse and Evans's lucid line illustrations, which infuse the narrative with emotional intensity.... An essential purchase."
School Library Journal

Grace Lin
"Bird in a Box will break, heal, and then fill your heart, all in one reading."
VOYA, December 2014 (Vol. 37, No. 5) - Teania Moore-Case
Amira lives in a village with her family and throughout this book, readers not only feel every emotion but can visualize what is going on through the poems of this twelve-year-old girl. Whether deaf or blind, everyone has a voice. Amira lost her voice, she could not speak, but she found a way to still be heard. To any teen who feels their voice is not heard, this book proves that people can always find a way to “speak.” Every voice should be heard and readers will hear this little girl. There is always a way to express yourself and that is what our generation is about. Reviewer: Teania Moore-Case, Teen Reviewer; Ages 11 to 15.
VOYA, December 2014 (Vol. 37, No. 5) - Kim Carter
Not long after Amira turns twelve and happily starts wearing a woman’s toob, her world begins to change faster and faster. First, her best friend Halima’s family moves from their small village to Nyala, the largest town in Darfur, so Halima can attend school. Amira’s family is too poor for her to attend school, however, and she spends her time helping her mother Muma and father Dando, drawing pictures in the dirt, and caring for her sheep, Nali, and her crippled sister Leila. Then come rumors of the Janjaweed and war, and one day Amira’s village is attacked and burned, and her beloved Dando is killed. Escaping with her remaining family and aging Anwar, her father’s dear friend, to the displaced persons camp at Kalma, Amira is locked in by “sorrow’s fence,” no longer drawing or talking, until the day the aide, Miss Sabine, brings her a very special red pencil. Sparse, lyrical free verse draws the reader into Amira’s world of simple pleasures and joy, tragedy and loss, and ultimately healing and triumph, bringing deep connections to this young girl’s spirit and creativity while buffering the atrocities of the Darfur conflict and life in a refugee camp. The Red Pencil provides a valuable perspective on the similarities and differences of another culture and way of life, with opportunities for historical and literary exploration. Reviewer: Kim Carter; Ages 11 to 15.
Kirkus Reviews
★ 2014-07-22
A 12-year-old Sudanese girl struggles for survival after a janjaweed attack on her town forces her family to seek safety in an overcrowded refugee camp. Amira Bright has a dream: to leave her South Darfur farm and attend Gad Primary School, where girls are accepted. Muma, her mother, is a traditionalist about girls' roles, while Dando, her father, and Old Anwar, a lifelong neighbor, are more supportive. Dando and Amira even have a favorite game called "What Else is Possible?" But when militia attackers suddenly upend her life, Amira is overcome with silent heartache. Relief comes when an aid worker at Kalma refugee camp offers her a yellow pad and a red pencil, eventually restoring her free expression. Telling her story in first-person verse, Pinkney uses deft strokes to create engaging characters through the poetry of their observations and the poignancy of their circumstances. This tale of displacement in a complex, war-torn country is both accessible and fluent, striking just the right tone for middle-grade readers. Evans' elemental drawings illuminate the spirit and yearnings of Amira, the earnest protagonist. A soulful story that captures the magic of possibility, even in difficult times. (author's note, illustrator's note, glossary) (Verse fiction. 8-12)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780316247818
Publisher:
Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
09/16/2014
Sold by:
Hachette Digital, Inc.
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
320
Sales rank:
115,427
File size:
22 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

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