Overview

The Red Spot on Jupiter is the title poem, a combination of two perspectives, poetry and science; the patina of the moon may shine on two lovers in Paris, and they may kiss in a moment of romance, but if only science prevails, then their kiss becomes invalid; poetry is necessary to justify the value of a kiss. As an avid Darwinian, and a lover of genetic alterations in creatures, I also like the beauty of birds and trees, and there are times when the Creator seems as real as ghosts in autumn leaves, and other ...
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The Red Spot

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Overview

The Red Spot on Jupiter is the title poem, a combination of two perspectives, poetry and science; the patina of the moon may shine on two lovers in Paris, and they may kiss in a moment of romance, but if only science prevails, then their kiss becomes invalid; poetry is necessary to justify the value of a kiss. As an avid Darwinian, and a lover of genetic alterations in creatures, I also like the beauty of birds and trees, and there are times when the Creator seems as real as ghosts in autumn leaves, and other times when He is just a fictitious wisp.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940015682090
  • Publisher: Write Services
  • Publication date: 9/19/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 217 KB

Meet the Author

Kenn Pappas is my pseudonym, Kenn being my real first name, Pappas being my mother's maiden name. Since she was Greek, my dad Jewish, I identify with each for separate purposes; my mom was poetic, angry, humorous, witty, incisive, alive in every moment. She possessed one element I'm extremely proud of ... a Greek temper. This poetry book would not be possible without the inspiration that her genes planted in mine.
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 11, 2013

    ¿So this Sonnet Walks Into a Bar¿ I¿ve previously reviewed the

    “So this Sonnet Walks Into a Bar”

    I’ve previously reviewed the use of sonics and poetic form in Kenn Pappas’ “Because You Are Dead”—check it out! Everything I’ve mentioned about the use and the intentional, humorous misuse of forms in his work stands.

    In this collection, Mr. Pappas attacks the sonnet. Hmmm—who writes sonnets anymore? I mean besides Shakespeare wannabes and the tenured dead. Well, Kenn Pappas does—and he reintroduces one of the sonnet’s best and least known friends—the joke.

    Anyway, so this sonnet walks into a bar and “Dancing Queen” is playing. “ABBA!” the sonnet yells. But “Red Spot” isn’t a descent into sophomoric doggerel—there are plenty poems here to satisfy the true lover of this arcane poetic form. However, when it seems apt, Kenn has no qualms about inserting that last GG couplet in true joke form. Take for instance his poem The Boy Across the Street, which ends with:

    Nobody'd care if you're dead, they'd say so.
    The boy across the street could use your legs, though.

    Or in a similar vein, the ending in Learning to Write

    It's said `one hundred chimps randomly typed Hamlet.'
    It took a zillion years. I haven't started yet

    This is sonneteering at its best—forcing the form to trick the reader into the rhyming joke hole. I could take the time to point out Mr. Pappas’ debt to poets such as W.B. Yeats or Robert Lowell—but I’ll let you do that. Pick up this book! You’ll be wrestling with your own couplets in no time.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 2, 2012

    Great Poetry!!

    I really enjoyed reading The Red Spot. It is unlike any poetry I've read before. The elements of science incorporated into poetry is both refreshing and unexpected. This collection of poems is a must read!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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