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The Relation of Mass to Energy
     

The Relation of Mass to Energy

by David Frost Comstock
 
Scanned, proofed and corrected from the original hardcover edition for enjoyable reading. (Worth every penny spent!)


***

An excerpt from the beginning:

1. WHETHER the inertia of matter has or has not a complete electromagnetic explanation is a question that it will perhaps take many years to answer with any degree of certainty. The

Overview

Scanned, proofed and corrected from the original hardcover edition for enjoyable reading. (Worth every penny spent!)


***

An excerpt from the beginning:

1. WHETHER the inertia of matter has or has not a complete electromagnetic explanation is a question that it will perhaps take many years to answer with any degree of certainty. The experiments of Kaufmann seem to prove that in the case of a single electron the mass is entirely of this origin; and it is impossible therefore to avoid the conclusion that at least a fraction of ordinary material inertia is also electromagnetic. Doubtless there is a psychological cause for our reluctance to accept the electromagnetic explanation as complete, constant familiarity with ponderable bodies having blinded us to the possibility of anything being more fundamental ; but certain it is, that if we free ourselves from prejudice as much as possible and adopt the well-tried policy of choosing the simplest theory which adequately represents the phenomena, —the theory that is, which involves the least number of variables,— we must decide in favour of the complete electromagnetic explanation, which involves only the aether and its properties.

2. The complexity of the Zeeman effect and the relations between the wave-lengths of the spectral lines, make it seem probable that if matter is to be considered as an electrical system, it must be much more complex than a system composed entirely of electrons separated by distances great in comparison to their size. It becomes therefore of interest to see whether any relations can be found between the mass of an electric system in general, and any of its other properties. It will be found that a general relation does exist, which is not only of considerable interest in itself, but also suggests other relations.

3. The straightforward calculation of the mass of an electric system possessing any distribution of charge and any internal velocities below that of light presents considerable difficulty; for such calculation involves the use of the scalar and vector potential, and these are not effective instantaneously at all parts of the system. Any expression for the mass of the system calculated in this way will therefore involve terms which vary in an extremely complicated way with the internal velocities when these are not very small. The same is true with respect to the velocity of the system as a whole. In the following discussion the problem is attacked in an entirely different way, which is not open to this objection.

As the constraints of the system are intimately involved, it will be well first to consider them.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940012293909
Publisher:
OGB
Publication date:
03/02/2011
Series:
The London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal Of Science. , #6
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
664 KB

Meet the Author

Daniel Frost Comstock (August 14, 1883, Newport, Rhode Island — March 2, 1970, Concord, Massachusetts)was an American physicist and engineer.

He attained a B.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1904. He also studied in Berlin, Zürich, and Basel, where he attained his Ph.D. in 1906. And at the University of Cambridge (1906–1907) he studied under J. J. Thomson. Beginning in 1904 he was a member of the faculty at MIT in theoretical physics (assistant professor 1910–1915; associate professor 1915–1917).

Comstock is most well known as the co-founder of the company Kalmus, Comstock & Westcott, and of Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation, which developed the second major color film process, after Britain's Kinemacolor, and the most widely used color motion picture process in Hollywood from 1922 to 1952.

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