The Renaissance Computer: Knowledge Technology in the First Age of Print

Overview

In the fifteenth century the printing press was the 'new technology'. The first ever information revolution began with the advent of the printed book, enabling Renaissance scholars to formulate new ways of organizing and disseminating knowledge. As early as 1500 there were already 20 million books in circulation in Europe. How did this rapid explosion of ideas impact upon the evolution of new disciplines?

The Renaissance Computer looks at the fascinating development of new ...

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2000 Hardback NEAR FINE This listing is a new book, a title currently in-print which we order directly and immediately from the publisher. Print on Demand title, produced to ... the highest standard, and there would be a delay in dispatch of around 15 working days. *****PLEASE NOTE: This item is shipping from an authorized seller in Europe. In the event that a return is necessary, you will be able to return your item within the US. To learn more about our European sellers and policies see the BookQuest FAQ section***** Read more Show Less

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Overview

In the fifteenth century the printing press was the 'new technology'. The first ever information revolution began with the advent of the printed book, enabling Renaissance scholars to formulate new ways of organizing and disseminating knowledge. As early as 1500 there were already 20 million books in circulation in Europe. How did this rapid explosion of ideas impact upon the evolution of new disciplines?

The Renaissance Computer looks at the fascinating development of new methods of information storage and retrieval which took place at the very beginning of print culture. It also asks some crucial questions about the intellectual conditions of our own digital age. A dazzling array of leading experts in Renaissance culture explore topics of urgent significance today, including the contribution of knowledge technologies to state formulation and national identity; the effect ofmultimedia, orality and memory on education; the importance of the visual display of information and how search engines reflect and direct ways of thinking.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780415220637
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 9/28/2000
  • Pages: 224
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 10.10 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Neil Rhodes is Reader in English Literature at the university of St Andrews. His previous publications include The Power of Eloquence and English Renaissance Literature (1992), John Donne: Selected Prose (1987), and Elizabethan Grotesque (1980). Jonathan Sawday is Senior Lecturer in English Literature at Strathclyde University. He is author of The Body Emblazoned (1995), and co-editor of Literature and the English Civil War.

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Table of Contents

List of illustrations
Acknowledgements
1 Introduction: Paperworlds: Imagining the Renaissance Computer 1
2 The Silence of the Archive and the Noise of Cyberspace 18
3 Towards the Renaissance Computer 29
4 From Trivium to Quadrivium: Ramus, Method and Mathematical Technology 45
5 Textual Icons: Reading Early Modern Illustrations 59
6 The Early Modern Search Engine: Indices, Title Pages, Marginalia and Contents 95
7 National and International Knowledge: the Limits of the Histories of Nations 106
8 Arachne's Web: Intertextual Mythography and the Renaissance Actaeon 120
9 The Daughters of Memory: Thomas Heywood's Gunaikeion and the Female Computer 135
10 Pierre de La Primaudaye's French Academy: Growing Encyclopaedic 157
11 In the Wilderness of Forms: Ideas and Things in Thomas Browne's Cabinets of Curiosity 170
12 Articulate Networks: the Self, the Book and the World 184
Notes on contributors 197
Further reading 199
Index 207
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