The The Republic Republic

The The Republic Republic

3.2 287
by Plato
     
 

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Often ranked as the greatest of Plato's many remarkable writings, this celebrated philosophical work of the fourth century B.C. contemplates the elements of an ideal state, serving as the forerunner for such other classics of political thought as Cicero's De Republica, St. Augustine's City of God, and Thomas More's Utopia.
Written in the

Overview

Often ranked as the greatest of Plato's many remarkable writings, this celebrated philosophical work of the fourth century B.C. contemplates the elements of an ideal state, serving as the forerunner for such other classics of political thought as Cicero's De Republica, St. Augustine's City of God, and Thomas More's Utopia.
Written in the form of a dialog in which Socrates questions his students and fellow citizens, The Republic concerns itself chiefly with the question, "What is justice?" as well as Plato's theory of ideas and his conception of the philosopher's role in society. To explore the latter, he invents the allegory of the cave to illustrate his notion that ordinary men are like prisoners in a cave, observing only the shadows of things, while philosophers are those who venture outside the cave and see things as they really are, and whose task it is to return to the cave and tell the truth about what they have seen. This dynamic metaphor expresses at once the eternal conflict between the world of the senses (the cave) and the world of ideas (the world outside the cave), and the philosopher's role as mediator between the two.
High school and college students, as well as lovers of classical literature and philosophy, will welcome this handsome and inexpensive edition of an immortal work. It appears here in the fine translation by the English classicist Benjamin Jowett.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

C.D.C. Reeve has taken the excellent Grube translation and, without sacrificing accuracy, rendered it into a vivid and contemporary style. It is intensity that is often lost in translation, but not here. This is not just a matter of style. The Republic is full of brilliant thoughts, and one needs to preserve brilliance to capture them. In the cave of translations, Reeve’s revision of Grube's Republic is closest to the sun. --Jonathan Lear, University of Chicago

Reeve has reworked the Grube translation thoroughly, raising the level of philosophical accuracy and updating the language, all the while retaining--and indeed enhancing--the celebrated readability of the Grube original. For a long time to come, Grube-Reeve will deservedly be the first choice of scholars and students alike. --John Cooper, Princeton University

P.C. Kemeny
This superior translation has an engaging, constructive tone. For introductory students with little or no historical background with which to appreciate the nuances of Plato's Republic, Tschemplik clearly sets the historical context and identifies the characters.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780486110974
Publisher:
Dover Publications
Publication date:
03/01/2012
Series:
Dover Thrift Editions
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
288
Sales rank:
685,203
File size:
766 KB
Age Range:
14 Years

Read an Excerpt


Socrates: I went down yesterday to Piraeus with Glaucon, Ariston’s son, to pray to the goddess, wanting at the same time also to see the way they were going to hold the festival, since they were now conducting it for the first time. The parade of the local residents seemed to me to be beautiful, while the one that the Thracians put on looked no less appropriate. And having prayed and having seen, we went off toward the city. Spotting us from a distance then as we headed home, Polemarchus, Cephalus’s son, ordered his slave to run and order us to wait for him. And grabbing me from behind by my cloak, the slave said “Polemarchus orders you to wait.” And I turned around and asked him where the man himself was. “He’s coming along from behind,” he said. “Just wait.” “Certainly we’ll wait” said Glaucon.

What People are saying about this

John Cooper
"Its increased accessibility promises to make it the number-one choice for undergraduate courses."
Princeton University
Lloyd P. Gerson
"Loving attention to detail and deep familiarity with Plato's thought are evident on every page."
University of Toronto

Meet the Author

Plato ( 428/427 BC - 348/347 BC) was a philosopher in Classical Greece. He was also a mathematician, student of Socrates, writer of philosophical dialogues, and founder of the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world. Along with his mentor, Socrates, and his student, Aristotle, Plato helped to lay the foundations of Western philosophy and science. In the words of A. N. Whitehead:

The safest general characterization of the European philosophical tradition is that it consists of a series of footnotes to Plato. I do not mean the systematic scheme of thought which scholars have doubtfully extracted from his writings. I allude to the wealth of general ideas scattered through them.

Plato's sophistication as a writer is evident in his Socratic dialogues; thirty-six dialogues and thirteen letters have been ascribed to him. Plato's writings have been published in several fashions; this has led to several conventions regarding the naming and referencing of Plato's texts. Plato's dialogues have been used to teach a range of subjects, including philosophy, logic, ethics, rhetoric, religion and mathematics. Plato is one of the most important founding figures in Western philosophy.

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The Republic 3.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 287 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
do not be fooled! this book was (and still is) ages ahead of its time. there is no merely 'suspecting' that you understand this book. when you 'get it' you will 'know.' try to find an accurate translation and not one which is 'more culturally relevant today' - the idea that the Republic can be made 'culturally relevant' is all the more ridiculous considering that its implications are virtually eternal (and were meant to be). Socrates asks a lot of simple but very penetrating questions. a common and fatal error in contemporary Platonic scholarship (but even in the past) is the answering of each question (quickly) singly and missing the big picture. regardless of the historical existence of the philosophical Socrates or the historical occurence of the dialogues in the Republic, the account Plato has recorded for us in his book is among the most exact analyses of the human condition ever committed to paper. the vocabulary is not difficult, but some of the concepts will require close attention. it's better to read this book when you have some time to commit.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Despite those outstandingly ignorant individuals who are so willingly embarass themselves, Plato's Republic is one of the most significant works produced in our human exsitence. What's even more unique about it is its broad scope and truth that can be revealed even in our lives today. Eveyone should read it. And for those who refuse to be embarassed again, read it one more time.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In 'The Republic', Plato attempts to outline an ideal society based on justice. The governemnt he suggests, however, is merely the backdrop for answering vital questions about human nature. Plato tries to define justice as well as philosophers, and argues that the just man is happier tha the unjust man. I highly recommend this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Walks in
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Special assasin for hire. Will work for rebels and/or council. Work for highest bidder. My name is will
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
He looked down at everyone from the tree she was in hoping for a friend.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
At 'Rules of War', result two. Please add on if you wish.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Chills in the shadows, watching
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Is confused
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She carved the words 'Sa patesti ce este al meu' in her tree with her dagger
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
1. Im not a jerk so im not posting ads for my camp at other ones. <br> <br> 2. Im still building it. Its not ready for the public.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Yolo my brothers
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Backs up, "Careful, thats a $670,000,000,000 suite."
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
*vanishes ibto thin air* sadly i must leave nooj but i have a k.i.k add me if you wanna talk its deathbyurmum
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Has anyone seen lacey?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
BUT I CAN STILL MAKE SCONES FOR EVERYONE RIGHT????
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Cypher walked in.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
((Sorry I was going to attempt to get on but now my moms taking my nook and idek why.))
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Shined her winged shoes
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Hey, y'all can add me as a Nook friend. Steam<_>46<_>@<_>yahoo<_>.<_>com"
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Go to riley res two
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
''Alright. I'm about to be training someone else but, I'll make do. Okay, so you say you have no idea how to fight, correct?''
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Cypher walked in.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hey rue whatcha up to?