The The Republic Republic [NOOK Book]

Overview

Often ranked as the greatest of Plato's many remarkable writings, this celebrated philosophical work of the fourth century BC contemplates the elements of an ideal state, serving as the forerunner for such other classics of political thought as Cicero's De Republica, St. Augustine's City of God, and Thomas More's Utopia.
Written in the form of a dialog in which Socrates questions his students and fellow citizens, The Republic concerns itself chiefly with the question, "What is ...

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The The Republic Republic

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Overview

Often ranked as the greatest of Plato's many remarkable writings, this celebrated philosophical work of the fourth century BC contemplates the elements of an ideal state, serving as the forerunner for such other classics of political thought as Cicero's De Republica, St. Augustine's City of God, and Thomas More's Utopia.
Written in the form of a dialog in which Socrates questions his students and fellow citizens, The Republic concerns itself chiefly with the question, "What is justice?" as well as Plato's theory of ideas and his conception of the philosopher's role in society. To explore the latter, he invents the allegory of the cave to illustrate his notion that ordinary men are like prisoners in a cave, observing only the shadows of things, while philosophers are those who venture outside the cave and see things as they really are, and whose task it is to return to the cave and tell the truth about what they have seen. This dynamic metaphor expresses at once the eternal conflict between the world of the senses (the cave) and the world of ideas (the world outside the cave), and the philosopher's role as mediator between the two.
High school and college students, as well as lovers of classical literature and philosophy, will welcome this handsome and inexpensive edition of an immortal work. It appears here in the fine translation by the English classicist Benjamin Jowett.

The most important of the Socratic dialogues, The Republic is concerned with the construction of an ideal commonwealth and thus is the earliest of utopias.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

C.D.C. Reeve has taken the excellent Grube translation and, without sacrificing accuracy, rendered it into a vivid and contemporary style. It is intensity that is often lost in translation, but not here. This is not just a matter of style. The Republic is full of brilliant thoughts, and one needs to preserve brilliance to capture them. In the cave of translations, Reeve’s revision of Grube's Republic is closest to the sun. --Jonathan Lear, University of Chicago

Reeve has reworked the Grube translation thoroughly, raising the level of philosophical accuracy and updating the language, all the while retaining--and indeed enhancing--the celebrated readability of the Grube original. For a long time to come, Grube-Reeve will deservedly be the first choice of scholars and students alike. --John Cooper, Princeton University

P.C. Kemeny
This superior translation has an engaging, constructive tone. For introductory students with little or no historical background with which to appreciate the nuances of Plato's Republic, Tschemplik clearly sets the historical context and identifies the characters.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780486110974
  • Publisher: Dover Publications
  • Publication date: 2/2/2012
  • Series: Dover Thrift Editions
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 760,171
  • File size: 749 KB

Meet the Author

Plato ( 428/427 BC - 348/347 BC) was a philosopher in Classical Greece. He was also a mathematician, student of Socrates, writer of philosophical dialogues, and founder of the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world. Along with his mentor, Socrates, and his student, Aristotle, Plato helped to lay the foundations of Western philosophy and science. In the words of A. N. Whitehead:

The safest general characterization of the European philosophical tradition is that it consists of a series of footnotes to Plato. I do not mean the systematic scheme of thought which scholars have doubtfully extracted from his writings. I allude to the wealth of general ideas scattered through them.

Plato's sophistication as a writer is evident in his Socratic dialogues; thirty-six dialogues and thirteen letters have been ascribed to him. Plato's writings have been published in several fashions; this has led to several conventions regarding the naming and referencing of Plato's texts. Plato's dialogues have been used to teach a range of subjects, including philosophy, logic, ethics, rhetoric, religion and mathematics. Plato is one of the most important founding figures in Western philosophy.

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Read an Excerpt


Socrates: I went down yesterday to Piraeus with Glaucon, Ariston’s son, to pray to the goddess, wanting at the same time also to see the way they were going to hold the festival, since they were now conducting it for the first time. The parade of the local residents seemed to me to be beautiful, while the one that the Thracians put on looked no less appropriate. And having prayed and having seen, we went off toward the city. Spotting us from a distance then as we headed home, Polemarchus, Cephalus’s son, ordered his slave to run and order us to wait for him. And grabbing me from behind by my cloak, the slave said “Polemarchus orders you to wait.” And I turned around and asked him where the man himself was. “He’s coming along from behind,” he said. “Just wait.” “Certainly we’ll wait” said Glaucon.
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Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Introduction Part 2 Book I Chapter 3 Study Questions Part 4 Book II Chapter 5 Study Questions Part 6 Book III Chapter 7 Study Questions Part 8 Book IV Chapter 9 Study Questions Part 10 Book V Chapter 11 Study Questions Part 12 Book VI Chapter 13 Study Questions Part 14 Book VII Chapter 15 Study Questions Part 16 Book VIII Chapter 17 Study Questions Part 18 Book IX Chapter 19 Study Questions Part 20 Book X Chapter 21 Study Questions Part 22 Appendix 1: Cephalus and Polemarchus (Lysias, Against Eratosthenes) Part 23 Appendix 2: Athenian Imperialism (Thucydides, "The Melian Dialogue") Part 24 Appendix 3: The Ring of Gyges (Herodotus, Histories, Book I) Part 25 Appendix 4: The Status of Women (Xenophon, Oeconomicus) Part 26 Appendix 5: Athenian Constitutional History

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 806 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(363)

4 Star

(49)

3 Star

(59)

2 Star

(23)

1 Star

(312)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 806 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2000

    Embarassment, anyone?

    Despite those outstandingly ignorant individuals who are so willingly embarass themselves, Plato's Republic is one of the most significant works produced in our human exsitence. What's even more unique about it is its broad scope and truth that can be revealed even in our lives today. Eveyone should read it. And for those who refuse to be embarassed again, read it one more time.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2015

    Spencer - Sits down missing Syren more than ever... I walk into

    Spencer - Sits down missing Syren more than ever... I walk into the forest. Darren, if your here, listening to me talk right now, please listen.  I hope we can still be together.  Your actually one of the nicest nook guys out there.  I got upset and I actually don't think your heart.  if you are, can u explain?  anyways, i love you.  please forgive me.  i look around hoping that he heard me.  i sit down.  Syren i miss you so much i whisper to myself.    

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 11, 2013

    The Republic was written by a philosopher named Plato in a Socra

    The Republic was written by a philosopher named Plato in a Socratic method around 380 BC. Plato starts off by discussing the definition of justice and the order and character of the just man in the city-state where he is from. He challenges what people think of Justice. He summarizes that Justice is the interest of the stronger when other people in the time period; and additionally onto today the majority of persons would argue that Justice is the equivalent to equalizing powers of the many social classes when in reality it drives a greater wedge into these classes. Plato writes down what Socrates deducts from multiple sources to answer questions to make the question more reasonable than what it started off to be. The argument/ debate is done in a dialogue. It is Plato's best-known work is proven to be one of the basis for philosophy and political theory.

    Additionally, Socrates and other Athenian and Greek philosophers discuss the meaning of justice and examine just man and unjust man by examining different societies in this time period and other places around the world. Plato along with all the other philosophers spread a theory of a perfect governing body/ administration that includes a city and an oligharchial (this is the term I have decided to use to suggest for Plato's Ideal Governing Administration) ruled the few intellectual philosophers and everything in the city should be revolved around intellect. He examined the techniques used in the existing regimes and discussed the advantages and disadvantages to each of them. The extensive list of philosophers included immortality of the soul and the roles of philosophers and other occupations in the societies mentioned. I would recommend this book to any philosphy major/ government officiates and intend that if regarded in close possession should intend to make the world a better place.

    Number of Remaining Characters:1587

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 4, 2015

    Kayden correction

    She says to Jack.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2015

    To ALL LES?BIANS

    To to epcot res onr

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2015

    Max

    Can i join?

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2015

    Carrie

    Gotta go see ya later jack

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2015

    Scorpion-ALL

    *storms in* TELL WHERE YOU HAVE HID CORVON!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2015

    Amber2

    Oh yeah sry. Im there

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2015

    Amber

    Sits and eats a apple holding my kitten

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2015

    Jake to Elmo

    YOU ROCCCCCKKK!!!!!!!!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2015

    To all not a add!

    Tonight we will have prom! Its at prom res 1 its not a camp so this is not an add.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2015

    Carrie

    Gtg

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2015

    Maria

    He looked down at everyone from the tree she was in hoping for a friend.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2015

    Brittany to connor

    Omg i love that song but it makes me cry everytime i listen to it!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2015

    Brittany

    Ok ill see u then..

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2015

    TO ALL LESBI.ANS

    Go to epcot res one

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2015

    Rules for fighting...

    At 'Rules of War', result two. Please add on if you wish.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2015

    Samara

    She walked in and looked around no emotion showing on her tannish face

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2015

    Preston

    Walks in amd watches them.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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