Republic [Jowett translation]

Republic [Jowett translation]

3.2 288
by Plato, Benjamin Jowett
     
 

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Often ranked as the greatest of Plato's many remarkable writings, this celebrated philosophical work of the fourth century B.C. contemplates the elements of an ideal state, serving as the forerunner for such other classics of political thought as Cicero's De Republica, St. Augustine's City of God, and Thomas More's Utopia.
Written in the

Overview

Often ranked as the greatest of Plato's many remarkable writings, this celebrated philosophical work of the fourth century B.C. contemplates the elements of an ideal state, serving as the forerunner for such other classics of political thought as Cicero's De Republica, St. Augustine's City of God, and Thomas More's Utopia.
Written in the form of a dialog in which Socrates questions his students and fellow citizens, The Republic concerns itself chiefly with the question, "What is justice?" as well as Plato's theory of ideas and his conception of the philosopher's role in society. To explore the latter, he invents the allegory of the cave to illustrate his notion that ordinary men are like prisoners in a cave, observing only the shadows of things, while philosophers are those who venture outside the cave and see things as they really are, and whose task it is to return to the cave and tell the truth about what they have seen. This dynamic metaphor expresses at once the eternal conflict between the world of the senses (the cave) and the world of ideas (the world outside the cave), and the philosopher's role as mediator between the two.
High school and college students, as well as lovers of classical literature and philosophy, will welcome this handsome and inexpensive edition of an immortal work. It appears here in the fine translation by the English classicist Benjamin Jowett.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Griffith's answer to the question "Why another translation of The Republic?" is that most current translations do not follow the form of a conversation, which Griffith feels the dialog is intended to convey. His aim was to translate the Greek text as if it were a conversation, and he has succeeded admirably. The text does indeed flow like a conversation, with the entire back-and-forth interaction that such exchanges involve. A comparison of his renderings of Books I, VII (the allegory of the cave), and VIII (the discussion of the four forms of unjust regimes) with the same passages in the second edition of Allan Bloom's translation of The Republic (Basic Bks., 1991) shows that Griffith's translation is, on the whole, much smoother and in that sense a more comfortable "read." Consider, for example, the first sentence in Book VII. Bloom's translation reads: " `Next, then,' I said, `make an image of our nature in its education and want of education, likening it to a condition of the following kind.' " Here is Griffith's translation: " `If we're thinking about the effect of education--or the lack of it on our nature, there's another comparison we can make.' " Griffith's smoother style suggests that this new translation may find a greater audience than others have. Griffith has also written a very useful introduction that places the work in historical context and provides a glossary that will help readers identify individuals and places mentioned in the work. Highly recommended for all public and academic libraries.--Terry Skeats, Bishop's Univ. Lib., Lennoxville, Quebec Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780486411217
Publisher:
Dover Publications
Publication date:
04/18/2000
Series:
Dover Thrift Editions Series
Pages:
320
Sales rank:
238,693
Product dimensions:
5.18(w) x 8.26(h) x 0.68(d)
Age Range:
14 Years

Read an Excerpt

Then if anyone at all is to have the privilege of lying, the rulers of the State should be the persons; and they, in their dealings either with enemies or with their own citizens, may be allowed to lie for the public good. But nobody else should meddle with anything of the kind.

Meet the Author

Plato ranks among the most familiar ancient philosophers, along with his teacher, Socrates, and his student, Aristotle. In addition to writing philosophical dialogues — used to teach logic, ethics, rhetoric, religion, and mathematics as well as philosophy — he founded Athens' Academy, the Western world's first institution of higher learning.

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The Republic 3.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 288 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
do not be fooled! this book was (and still is) ages ahead of its time. there is no merely 'suspecting' that you understand this book. when you 'get it' you will 'know.' try to find an accurate translation and not one which is 'more culturally relevant today' - the idea that the Republic can be made 'culturally relevant' is all the more ridiculous considering that its implications are virtually eternal (and were meant to be). Socrates asks a lot of simple but very penetrating questions. a common and fatal error in contemporary Platonic scholarship (but even in the past) is the answering of each question (quickly) singly and missing the big picture. regardless of the historical existence of the philosophical Socrates or the historical occurence of the dialogues in the Republic, the account Plato has recorded for us in his book is among the most exact analyses of the human condition ever committed to paper. the vocabulary is not difficult, but some of the concepts will require close attention. it's better to read this book when you have some time to commit.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Despite those outstandingly ignorant individuals who are so willingly embarass themselves, Plato's Republic is one of the most significant works produced in our human exsitence. What's even more unique about it is its broad scope and truth that can be revealed even in our lives today. Eveyone should read it. And for those who refuse to be embarassed again, read it one more time.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In 'The Republic', Plato attempts to outline an ideal society based on justice. The governemnt he suggests, however, is merely the backdrop for answering vital questions about human nature. Plato tries to define justice as well as philosophers, and argues that the just man is happier tha the unjust man. I highly recommend this book.
Anonymous 3 months ago
"I told you before, I'm just not good at this stuff.. I'm very messed up inside!" Looks up at him.
Anonymous 3 months ago
Anyone
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Walks in
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Special assasin for hire. Will work for rebels and/or council. Work for highest bidder. My name is will
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
He looked down at everyone from the tree she was in hoping for a friend.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
At 'Rules of War', result two. Please add on if you wish.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Chills in the shadows, watching
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Is confused
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She carved the words 'Sa patesti ce este al meu' in her tree with her dagger
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
1. Im not a jerk so im not posting ads for my camp at other ones. <br> <br> 2. Im still building it. Its not ready for the public.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Yolo my brothers
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Backs up, "Careful, thats a $670,000,000,000 suite."
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
*vanishes ibto thin air* sadly i must leave nooj but i have a k.i.k add me if you wanna talk its deathbyurmum
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Has anyone seen lacey?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
BUT I CAN STILL MAKE SCONES FOR EVERYONE RIGHT????
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Cypher walked in.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
((Sorry I was going to attempt to get on but now my moms taking my nook and idek why.))
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Shined her winged shoes
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Hey, y'all can add me as a Nook friend. Steam<_>46<_>@<_>yahoo<_>.<_>com"
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Go to riley res two
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
''Alright. I'm about to be training someone else but, I'll make do. Okay, so you say you have no idea how to fight, correct?''