The Republic (Large Print Edition)

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Overview

The Republic of Plato is the longest of his works with the exception of the Laws, and is certainly the greatest of them. There are nearer approaches to modern metaphysics in the Philebus and in the Sophist; the Politicus or Statesman is more ideal; the form and institutions of the State are more clearly drawn out in the Laws; as works of art, the Symposium and the Protagoras are of higher excellence. But no other Dialogue of Plato has the same largeness of view and the same perfection of style; no other shows an ...
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The Republic

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Overview

The Republic of Plato is the longest of his works with the exception of the Laws, and is certainly the greatest of them. There are nearer approaches to modern metaphysics in the Philebus and in the Sophist; the Politicus or Statesman is more ideal; the form and institutions of the State are more clearly drawn out in the Laws; as works of art, the Symposium and the Protagoras are of higher excellence. But no other Dialogue of Plato has the same largeness of view and the same perfection of style; no other shows an equal knowledge of the world, or contains more of those thoughts which are new as well as old, and not of one age only but of all. Nowhere in Plato is there a deeper irony or a greater wealth of humour or imagery, or more dramatic power. Nor in any other of his writings is the attempt made to interweave life and speculation, or to connect politics with philosophy. The Republic is the centre around which the other Dialogues may be grouped; here philosophy reaches the highest point (cp, especially in Books V, VI, VII) to which ancient thinkers ever attained. Plato among the Greeks, like Bacon among the moderns, was the first who conceived a method of knowledge, although neither of them always distinguished the bare outline or form from the substance of truth; and both of them had to be content with an abstraction of science which was not yet realized. He was the greatest metaphysical genius whom the world has seen; and in him, more than in any other ancient thinker, the germs of future knowledge are contained. The sciences of logic and psychology, which have supplied so many instruments of thought to after-ages, are based upon the analyses of Socrates and Plato. The principles of definition, the law of contradiction, the fallacy of arguing in a circle, the distinction between the essence and accidents of a thing or notion, between means and ends, between causes and conditions; also the division of the mind into the rational, concupiscent, and irascible elements, or of pleasures and desires into necessary and unnecessary-these and other great forms of thought are all of them to be found in the Republic, and were probably first invented by Plato.

The most important of the Socratic dialogues, The Republic is concerned with the construction of an ideal commonwealth and thus is the earliest of utopias.

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What People Are Saying

John Cooper
"Its increased accessibility promises to make it the number-one choice for undergraduate courses."
Princeton University
Lloyd P. Gerson
"Loving attention to detail and deep familiarity with Plato's thought are evident on every page."
University of Toronto
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781490930985
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
  • Publication date: 7/6/2013
  • Pages: 564
  • Sales rank: 1,370,247
  • Product dimensions: 8.50 (w) x 11.00 (h) x 1.14 (d)

Meet the Author

Robin Waterfield is a distinguished translator and author. Previously a consultant editor for Collins-Harvill, his translations of Plato include Philebus (1982), Theatetus (1987), Early Socratic Dialogues (1987), and Symposium (WC, Jan, 1994).

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Read an Excerpt

Then if anyone at all is to have the privilege of lying, the rulers of the State should be the persons; and they, in their dealings either with enemies or with their own citizens, may be allowed to lie for the public good. But nobody else should meddle with anything of the kind.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 884 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(409)

4 Star

(56)

3 Star

(72)

2 Star

(31)

1 Star

(316)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 884 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2000

    Embarassment, anyone?

    Despite those outstandingly ignorant individuals who are so willingly embarass themselves, Plato's Republic is one of the most significant works produced in our human exsitence. What's even more unique about it is its broad scope and truth that can be revealed even in our lives today. Eveyone should read it. And for those who refuse to be embarassed again, read it one more time.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2015

    Spencer - Sits down missing Syren more than ever... I walk into

    Spencer - Sits down missing Syren more than ever... I walk into the forest. Darren, if your here, listening to me talk right now, please listen.  I hope we can still be together.  Your actually one of the nicest nook guys out there.  I got upset and I actually don't think your heart.  if you are, can u explain?  anyways, i love you.  please forgive me.  i look around hoping that he heard me.  i sit down.  Syren i miss you so much i whisper to myself.    

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 11, 2013

    The Republic was written by a philosopher named Plato in a Socra

    The Republic was written by a philosopher named Plato in a Socratic method around 380 BC. Plato starts off by discussing the definition of justice and the order and character of the just man in the city-state where he is from. He challenges what people think of Justice. He summarizes that Justice is the interest of the stronger when other people in the time period; and additionally onto today the majority of persons would argue that Justice is the equivalent to equalizing powers of the many social classes when in reality it drives a greater wedge into these classes. Plato writes down what Socrates deducts from multiple sources to answer questions to make the question more reasonable than what it started off to be. The argument/ debate is done in a dialogue. It is Plato's best-known work is proven to be one of the basis for philosophy and political theory.

    Additionally, Socrates and other Athenian and Greek philosophers discuss the meaning of justice and examine just man and unjust man by examining different societies in this time period and other places around the world. Plato along with all the other philosophers spread a theory of a perfect governing body/ administration that includes a city and an oligharchial (this is the term I have decided to use to suggest for Plato's Ideal Governing Administration) ruled the few intellectual philosophers and everything in the city should be revolved around intellect. He examined the techniques used in the existing regimes and discussed the advantages and disadvantages to each of them. The extensive list of philosophers included immortality of the soul and the roles of philosophers and other occupations in the societies mentioned. I would recommend this book to any philosphy major/ government officiates and intend that if regarded in close possession should intend to make the world a better place.

    Number of Remaining Characters:1587

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2015

    Icestorm

    Yeah thts right. U jackwagon!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2015

    Jackwagon

    Fine ttyl!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2015

    Jackwagon

    He sits down.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2015

    Sage

    You know bw? Well i havent talked to her for over a year. Its suck. She recognized my name i guess and then i recognized hers. She didnt respond since it was 3:30 am lol

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2015

    #partying with my broz

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2015

    Emilia

    It serously true and whoever it is neeeeds to stop

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2015

    Almond2

    Im tired nitw) huggels sagey nite sagey meh going to sleep curls up by her with a bottle of wipcream and sleeps

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2015

    Sage (post)

    So. Bored.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2015

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2015

    Eva

    "That must stink." She smiled, while waking away.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2015

    Grimm to Makko

    You got a lucky lady *walks away sadly*

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2015

    Makko 2

    How dont you know the movie?))

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2015

    Calli

    *She dispoofed.*

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2015

    Grimm to Lukas

    *sits by you* I'm Grimm daughter of Hades

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2015

    Ashlyn

    Because calling me stupid makes me wanna tallk to you even more. Not. Thank you, because i need one more person to call me stupid insult me.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2015

    Person

    Your welcome now ask eachother out. Lololol &#9786 *vanished*

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2015

    April, "I am using my computer, because my nook broke Febru

    April, "I am using my computer, because my nook broke February! So that is some other stupid April!!!!!!! I'm changing my name."

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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