The Republic

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Overview

The volume that you hold in your hands offers a distinctive alternative to the many editions of Plato's Republic currently in print. Andrea Tschemplik provides a fresh and accessible translation of Plato's classic work, specially designed to aid newcomers in better understanding and appreciating the text. In addition, this volume provides a range of student-friendly supplements to enhance the learning experience. A general introduction addresses the standard challenges associated with reading Platonic dialogues, outlines the basic structure of the work, introduces key characters, and offers historical context. Each book begins with a helpful outline, and ends with study questions ideal for classroom discussion, paper assignments, or self-guided consideration of the text. Annotations, appendices, and an extensive index round out the volume.

The most important of the Socratic dialogues, The Republic is concerned with the construction of an ideal commonwealth and thus is the earliest of utopias.

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Editorial Reviews

P.C. Kemeny
This superior translation has an engaging, constructive tone. For introductory students with little or no historical background with which to appreciate the nuances of Plato's Republic, Tschemplik clearly sets the historical context and identifies the characters.
From the Publisher

C.D.C. Reeve has taken the excellent Grube translation and, without sacrificing accuracy, rendered it into a vivid and contemporary style. It is intensity that is often lost in translation, but not here. This is not just a matter of style. The Republic is full of brilliant thoughts, and one needs to preserve brilliance to capture them. In the cave of translations, Reeve’s revision of Grube's Republic is closest to the sun. --Jonathan Lear, University of Chicago

Reeve has reworked the Grube translation thoroughly, raising the level of philosophical accuracy and updating the language, all the while retaining--and indeed enhancing--the celebrated readability of the Grube original. For a long time to come, Grube-Reeve will deservedly be the first choice of scholars and students alike. --John Cooper, Princeton University

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780742543973
  • Publisher: The Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group Inc
  • Publication date: 11/28/2005
  • Edition description: Student
  • Pages: 430
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.13 (d)

Meet the Author

Andrea Tschemplik is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at American University.

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Read an Excerpt


Socrates: I went down yesterday to Piraeus with Glaucon, Ariston’s son, to pray to the goddess, wanting at the same time also to see the way they were going to hold the festival, since they were now conducting it for the first time. The parade of the local residents seemed to me to be beautiful, while the one that the Thracians put on looked no less appropriate. And having prayed and having seen, we went off toward the city. Spotting us from a distance then as we headed home, Polemarchus, Cephalus’s son, ordered his slave to run and order us to wait for him. And grabbing me from behind by my cloak, the slave said “Polemarchus orders you to wait.” And I turned around and asked him where the man himself was. “He’s coming along from behind,” he said. “Just wait.” “Certainly we’ll wait” said Glaucon.
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Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Introduction Part 2 Book I Chapter 3 Study Questions Part 4 Book II Chapter 5 Study Questions Part 6 Book III Chapter 7 Study Questions Part 8 Book IV Chapter 9 Study Questions Part 10 Book V Chapter 11 Study Questions Part 12 Book VI Chapter 13 Study Questions Part 14 Book VII Chapter 15 Study Questions Part 16 Book VIII Chapter 17 Study Questions Part 18 Book IX Chapter 19 Study Questions Part 20 Book X Chapter 21 Study Questions Part 22 Appendix 1: Cephalus and Polemarchus (Lysias, Against Eratosthenes) Part 23 Appendix 2: Athenian Imperialism (Thucydides, "The Melian Dialogue") Part 24 Appendix 3: The Ring of Gyges (Herodotus, Histories, Book I) Part 25 Appendix 4: The Status of Women (Xenophon, Oeconomicus) Part 26 Appendix 5: Athenian Constitutional History

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2003

    Much about nothing

    I don't know if it was the book or just Jowett's translation, but this thing was a chore to read. Only a few sentences made anything click in my head that was worth the while to think about. Yes, this book is a foundation for a lot of other works, but not very interesting in itself. Instead of reading it, just ask questions to yourself and use your own brain.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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