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The Revolt against Dualism: An Inquiry Concerning the Existence of Ideas
     

The Revolt against Dualism: An Inquiry Concerning the Existence of Ideas

by Arthur O. Lovejoy, Jonathan B. Imber (Introduction), Jonathan Imber (Introduction)
 
The Revolt Against Dualism, first published in 1930, belongs to a tradition in philosophical theorizing that Arthur O. Lovejoy called "descriptive epistemology." Lovejoy's principal aim in this book is to clarify the distinction between the quite separate phenomena of the knower and the known, something regularly obvious to common sense, if not always to intellectual

Overview

The Revolt Against Dualism, first published in 1930, belongs to a tradition in philosophical theorizing that Arthur O. Lovejoy called "descriptive epistemology." Lovejoy's principal aim in this book is to clarify the distinction between the quite separate phenomena of the knower and the known, something regularly obvious to common sense, if not always to intellectual understanding. This work is as much an argument about the ineluctable differences between subject and object and between mentality and reality, as it is a subtle polemic against those who would stray far from acknowledging these differences. With a resolve that lasts over three hundred pages, Lovejoy offers candid evaluations of a generation's worth of philosophical discussions that address the problem of epistemological dualism.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781560008477
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Publication date:
09/30/1995
Pages:
424
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.01(d)

Meet the Author

Arthur O. Lovejoy (1873-1962) was professor of philosophy at John Hopkins University where he founded the History of Ideas Club. He believed that the history of ideas should focus on singular concepts. He founded the Journal of the History of Ideas. Some of his most famous writings include Reflections on Human Nature, The Revolt against Dualism, and Primitivism and Related Ideas in Antiquity. Jonathan B. Imber is Jean Glasscock Professor of Sociology at Wellesley College.

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