The Rhythm of Being: The Gifford Lectures

Overview

One of the world's most important philosophers of religion reveals the unity of cosmic Mystery in this distillation of the wisdom of East and West, North and South.

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The Rhythm of Being: The Unbroken Trinity: The Gifford Lectures

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Overview

One of the world's most important philosophers of religion reveals the unity of cosmic Mystery in this distillation of the wisdom of East and West, North and South.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781626980150
  • Publisher: Orbis Books
  • Publication date: 4/1/2013
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 448
  • Sales rank: 614,082
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments xiii

Foreword xv

Preface xvii

A Locus Philosophicus xvii

B A Note on Language xx

C Perspective of the Book xxiii

Abbreviations of Titles of Texts Used in References xxv

Books of the Bible xxv

Other Classic Texts xxv

1 Introduction 1

A All or Nothing 1

1 The Choice of the Topic 3

2 The Context 7

3 The Aim 9

4 The Theme 11

B The Method 12

1 Humor 13

2 The Holistic Attempt 16

a A Threefold Approach 18

1 The Socio-Historical Approach 18

2 The Philosophical Approach 19

3 The Sophianic Approach 21

b The Starting Point 22

1 The Questioner 25

2 The Questioned 27

3 The Question 29

c The Vital Circle 31

3 The Purification of the Heart 34

C Regarding the Title and Subtitle 37

1 Rhythm 38

a Universality of Rhythm 38

b Phenomenological Approach 41

c Rhythmic Quaternity 44

d The Experience of Rhythm 48

2 Being 50

3 Trinity 55

II The Destiny of Being 58

A The Ultimate Question(s) 58

1 Some Examples 61

2 What is an Ultimate Question? 67

3 The Dialectic of Ultimate Questions 70

B Reality and Being 74

1 The Sense of the Real 74

2 The Discovery of Being 80

C Becoming and Destiny 94

1 Becoming 94

a Movement 95

b Change 96

c Growth 96

d History 97

2 Destiny 100

a Sociological Interlude 101

b Etymological Excursus 102

c The Destiny of Being 104

III Ancient Answers 108

1 Immutability 109

2 Respect for Tradition 110

3 Classification of Religions 112

A The Theistic Mythos 115

1 The Principle of Reasonableness 116

2 The Axiom of Non-Contradiction 118

3 Non-Theistic Mythoi 120

B Monotheism 121

1 Description 122

2 Genesis 127

a Political 127

b Philosophical 128

c Theological 129

3 Critique 129

a Internal 130

1 Understanding Faith 130

2 An Unknown God 131

3 The Historical Touchstone 132

b Philosophical 135

1 Substantiality 135

2 Omnipotence 143

a God 145

b Man 145

3 Omniscience 146

4 God and Being 149

C Other Forms of Theism 156

1 Deism 156

2 Pantheism 158

3 Polytheism 162

4 Atheism 166

5 Agnosticism 168

6 Skepticism 169

IV The Dwelling of the Divine 171

A The Divine Mystery 171

1 The Transcendent Plane 174

2 The Immanent Locus 176

3 The Adualistic Space 178

B Theology 181

1 Philosophy and Theology 181

2 Theology and Kosmology 185

3 The Word of and about God 188

4 Theological Language 190

a Theology as an Activity of the Logos 193

1 Theology as a Construct of Signs 193

2 Theology as a Conceptual System 194

3 Theology as a Symbolic Knowledge 196

4 Theology as Theopraxis 197

b Theology as a Work of the Mythos 199

1 Aesthetic 199

2 Apophatic 200

3 Mystical 203

4 The Mythological Character 206

5 Theology as Divine Life 207

C Ultimate Answers? 208

V The Triadic Myth 212

A Advaita and Trinity 213

1 Monism and Dualism 213

2 Advaita 216

3 Trinity 224

4 Some Examples from History 227

B The Anthropophanic Factor 232

1 The Human Approach to Reality 233

2 The Three Eyes 236

a The Senses 238

b Reason 239

c Spirit 240

3 The Threefold Experience 241

4 The Mystical 244

a Its Locus 245

b The Field of Emptiness 246

c The Mystical Translation 249

d Its Existential Character 250

e Its Fragility 252

C A Christian Reflection 253

VI The Theanthropocosmic Invariant 263

A The Invisibility of the Obvious 263

1 The Open Secret 263

2 Human Invariants and Cultural Universals 267

B The Primacy of Life 269

1 The Being of Life 269

2 Life of Being 274

C The Triple Interindependence: The Cosmotheandric Intuition 276

1 Kosmos 278

a A Stone qua Real Stone 278

b The World qua Real World 285

2 Anthropos 289

a Caturloka 290

1 The World of the Gods 290

2 The World of Nature 291

3 The World of History 291

4 The World of Technocracy 291

b A Rational Animal? 292

1 Formal 293

2 Cultural 295

3 Experimental 298

c A Trinitarian Mystery 301

3 Theos 304

a Faith and Belief 305

1 Faith 305

2 Belief 306

b Apophatism 308

c Features of the Divine 311

1 Nothingness 312

2 Freedom 315

4 Infinitude 317

VII The Divine Dimension 319

A Silence 323

1 The Body 325

2 The Mind 328

3 The Will 334

B Logos 337

1 Speech 338

2 Worship 341

a Glory 342

b Prayer 345

c Listening 347

3 Doing 348

a Transformation of the Cosmos 349

b The Case of the Human Household 353

c Political Involvement 355

C Personalism 359

1 Istadevata Spirituality 359

2 Contemplation 364

VIII The Emerging Mythos 368

A A New Kosmology 369

1 Cosmology and Kosmology 369

2 The Conflict of Kosmologies 373

3 The Metaphysical Problem 378

B The Scientific Paradigm 383

1 Method 385

2 Monotheistic Cosmology 388

3 The Scientific Story 393

C Fragments of the New Story 398

Epilogue 405

Index 406

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  • Posted January 26, 2011

    the intellectual Westerner's path to rest of the world's religion

    A lot of indian religion and buddhism. (Weak on Chinese philosophy.) But one does not need knowledge of foreign language. It is all explained. To most, this may be an advanced introduction to religion; and a Westerner's view on Hinduism and Buddhaism. Perhaps if needed to put Panikkar in some category it will be like Thomas Berry: a futureist. But unlike Berry, Panikkar will make the quest into the soul, the religious history, at times dark. However, personally, I was not too clear about Panikkar's triadic myth: man, cosmos, and divine. The first two chapters are the strength of the book where he explicate the rhythm of Being. Quite interesting. And what one, crys to find out that there is no chapter 9 where he was suppose to expound on the Being.

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