The Right Time: John Henry ''Pop'' Lloyd and Black Baseball

( 2 )

Overview

Although he never played a day in the white major leagues, John Henry "Pop" Lloyd was one of the greatest baseball players who ever lived. A shortstop who could take over a game with his glove or his bat, Lloyd dominated early black baseball, drawing early comparisons to the most celebrated National Leaguer of his day, Honus Wagner, who declared it a privilege to be mentioned with Lloyd.

Beginning his career years before the first Negro National League was established, Lloyd ...

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Overview

Although he never played a day in the white major leagues, John Henry "Pop" Lloyd was one of the greatest baseball players who ever lived. A shortstop who could take over a game with his glove or his bat, Lloyd dominated early black baseball, drawing early comparisons to the most celebrated National Leaguer of his day, Honus Wagner, who declared it a privilege to be mentioned with Lloyd.

Beginning his career years before the first Negro National League was established, Lloyd played for a dizzying number of teams, following the money, as he'd put it, throughout the country and sometimes past its borders, doing several stints in Cuba. He was seemingly ageless, winning two batting titles in his 40s and playing at the highest levels of blackball until he was 48. (He would continue to coach and play semi-pro baseball for another ten years.) Admired by teammates and opponents alike for his generosity and quiet strength, Lloyd was also one of the most beloved figures in white or black baseball.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Notwithstanding the welter of books that have appeared on the Negro Leagues, biographies of many of black baseball's greatest participants have yet to be published. This work partially rectifies that omission in the case of one of the game's legendary figures, John Henry Lloyd, often referred to as the "black Honus Wagner." Singletary's account demonstrates some of the strengths and weaknesses of research into and writing about the Negro Leagues. At times, Lloyd disappears from the book for extended periods, which can undoubtedly be attributed to a paucity of archival resources. Nevertheless, Singletary makes a real contribution, having extensively delved into black newspapers to cull information. For serious baseball fans.—R.C.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780786435722
  • Publisher: McFarland & Company, Incorporated Publishers
  • Publication date: 4/14/2011
  • Pages: 239
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Wes Singletary has written numerous articles on baseball history for Nine and other publications. A Tampa native, he lives in Tallahassee.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 4, 2011

    The Right Time

    "The Right Time: John Henry "Pop' Lloyd and Black Baseball," by Wes Singletary has certainly arrived at the right time. With so few books based on former negro league players available, Singletary has done an admirable job in researching and writing on the subject. He brings Pop Lloyd to life, showing the affable, hard-hitting gentleman to be an incredible ballplayer, humanitarian and husband. More so, however, Singletary provides a snapshot of the unrelenting style of black baseball played during Lloyd's era. The players - Steel Arm Johnny Taylor, Dick Lundy, Jose Mendez... - are portrayed as men seeking work where a segregated system pushed them, but enjoying an incredible sense of freedom because of it. So many outstanding ballplayers banished, for what? This book gives one an idea of what was lost.

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    Posted May 30, 2012

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