The Right to Lead: Learning Leadership Through Character and Courage [NOOK Book]

Overview

John Maxwell offers key principles, stories, and reflections on
preparing a leader's mind and heart to lead both themselves and others.


Leadership is something you learn and earn the right to do.  Renowned business writer, motivational speaker, and NY Times bestselling author, John C. Maxwell, shares ...

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The Right to Lead: Learning Leadership Through Character and Courage

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Overview

John Maxwell offers key principles, stories, and reflections on
preparing a leader's mind and heart to lead both themselves and others.


Leadership is something you learn and earn the right to do.  Renowned business writer, motivational speaker, and NY Times bestselling author, John C. Maxwell, shares insight on what it takes to be a leader.  The Right to Lead
is a character study of outstanding men and women throughout history,
focusing on the qualities that are consistent in the lives of these
great leaders.  Perfect for gift giving for a graduation, Father's Day,
or year-round for business or church leaders.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781418534967
  • Publisher: Nelson, Thomas, Inc.
  • Publication date: 5/26/2010
  • Sold by: THOMAS NELSON
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 128
  • Sales rank: 60,033
  • File size: 880 KB

Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 3, 2010

    great for inspiration

    "The Right to Lead" John Maxwell
    I think that I have read about every John Maxwell book that he has written. I really have not been disappointed with any of the books and after reading most of them I have been challenged. I love how I read his books and how I am not just challenged about how I do ministry (leadership) but I am also challenged in my personal life.
    "Leadership is something you learn and earn the right to do."
    This book was great. I lived the ideas and principles that are brought up. What I loved the most was the stories; the stories of the people that earned the right to lead others. These are the people that challenged the status quo and did it differently. These people paved the way for others to follow them. Reading their stories challenged me personally to lead the way and to take more risk.
    This is a great book for leadership teams and also for a gift for someone. It's a really good book to read as a group and also to use in a study of some kind. Pick it up and read it and you will not be disappointed. Be challenged by others challenges.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 30, 2010

    The Right to Lead by John Maxwell

    I'm sure many leaders have read leadership books. I know I have. In fact, we read, notate, study - we work at understanding the concepts, figuring them out, determining how they apply, and what we can do.

    This book will give you something of a break - not from learning and improving, but from the amount of work involved.

    I his book The Right to Lead, John Maxwell has created a very practical guide to leadership. He provides 7 core principles, and delivers them in a way that will be immediately understandable and actionable. He relies on stories quotes from people we've heard about, and illustrates these principles. No heavy theory, no deep philosophy, just clarity.

    I'd also add that this is not just your typical business leadership book - it can apply to parents leading their children as well as a CEO driving a multi-billion dollar enterprise.

    I would heartily recommend this book to anyone that recognizes their need to develop as a leader.


    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com <http://BookSneeze.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 7, 2010

    The Right to Lead: Learning Leadership Through Character and Courage

    Recently I was blessed the chance to read an encouraging and inspirational book by John C Maxwell. The Right to Lead, Learning Leadership through Character and Courage is a delightful, easy read that would make an excellent gift for anyone on your list. Mr. Maxwell prefaces the book by asking the question, "What gives a man or woman the right to lead?" He than shares guidelines that will help prepare you to become a better leader. The book includes story's, antidotes and wisdom from many individuals on the character and courage that is necessary to be a leader among men. Some of the examples of leaders that are shared in this book are US Army General H Norman Schwarzkop, Nelson Mandela, Eric Liddell, Harriet Tubman, Japanese Consul-General Chiune Sugihara, Eddie Rickenbacker and many more.

    Here's a quick glimpse of one antidote that really tugged at my heart:

    In Germany the Nazis came first for the Communist, and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a Communist. Then they came for the Jews, and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a Jew. Then they came for the trade unionists, and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a trade unionist. then they came for the Catholics, and I didn't speak up because I was a Protestant. Then they came for me--and by that time no one was left to speak up.--Martin Niemoller

    This is one book, I will definitely purchase a few extra to have on hand to share with others.

    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255 : "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 2, 2010

    Earning the Right to Lead

    What gives people the right to lead? What traits do great leaders possess? John Maxwell captures these thoughts in his book, "The Right to Lead: Learning Leadership Through Character and Courage." This book reinforces the idea that leaders must earn the right to lead, and Maxwell outlines several individuals - both famous and less known - to highlight various leadership examples.

    I was introduced to John Maxwell's materials while in college, and I have found him to be extremely helpful over the years. This book was no exception. I like the format: a quick story to illustrate the principle and quotes or quips to emphasize the point. The focus of the book is not religious in nature, although Maxwell interweaves his faith throughout the book.

    I think this book is best read through twice. The first time, read the book through to get a feel for the narrative. The second time, read it one section per day, per week, maybe per month, and focus on this one topic.

    I would highly recommend this book for a new leader, an inspiring leader, or a recent graduate. Earn the right to lead before assuming the post of leadership. Thank you, Dr. Maxwell.


    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255 : "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 26, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    The Kind of Leader Others Follow

    The Right to Lead inspires everyone to be a leader in both their personal and professional interactions, regardless of the title they hold at work. Maxwell uses a series of quotes, stories and anecdotes to describe the type of leader that others want to follow. The key message is that true leaders follow their heart; they do the right thing in the right moment to help others. In those selfless acts, they organically grow their power and influence as a leader.

    This book instantly grabbed my attention from the preface with powerful, yet simple advice on what makes a great leader. I found myself simultaneously remembering all of my previous managers and assessing how they measured up to Maxwell's guidelines. Throughout the book, he expertly highlights the diversity among the world's greatest leaders and includes stories about individuals like Nelson Mandela, to Harriet Tubman, George Washington and many biblical figures including the famous story of Noah's Arc. Despite the significant differences among these leaders and the times they were alive, Maxwell weaves a common threat of traits and skills that these unique individuals share and contribute to their success.

    While some may find the religious undertones of this book distracting, it is written in a wonderful way that combines great historical and biblical stories with references to modern day movies that make the lessons come alive for both young and old. This balance makes the book appropriate for both a corporate training session and a Sunday school bible discussion. It teaches the seemingly complex philosophies of leadership in an everyday language that anyone can apply at school, at home, in the copy room or in the executive board room. The best part is, you can read the book in under an hour and I guarantee you will find at least one story or thought that strikes a chord with you and inspires a new leadership quality in your approach with others.

    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

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  • Posted June 16, 2010

    Great Book about Leadership

    John Maxwell has written quite a few books on Leadership. He is looked upon in both the secular and Christian world as a person to read to understand what a good leader looks like and how to be a good leader. This book is a small coffee table style book in which one puts on the. coffee table (who would have thunk it). This book is just a conglomeration of quotes and stories about what it takes to be a good leader.

    The right to Lead is split into seven sections: Action, Vision, Sacrifice, Risk, Determination, Service, and Integrity. These are the major things it takes to be a good leader. Some of the people mentioned in the book that were good leaders weren't people that I would have initially thought about. I think of people like Lincoln, Washington, or Mandela and while these people are mentioned there are also people like John Wooden, Maximus, or even General Chiune Sugihara. It was a fantastic insight on his part to show there are some people we have never heard of to show their leadership qualities. We are not leaders because of the praise we obtain. We are leaders because that is who we are called to be. This has been a recurring theme in the previous months, so this was just another way of God kicking me in the pants and telling me I need to get it in gear. This was a great and easy read a good book to put on your coffee table.

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