Rise and Fall of Butch Walker and the Let's-Go-Out-Tonites

The Rise and Fall of Butch Walker and the Let's-Go-Out-Tonites

4.5 2
by Butch Walker
     
 
Butch Walker has been doing the '70s-inspired rock thing for quite a while, and doing it quite well, though without much acclaim from the general public. The music biz has embraced him as a hot producer, though. Working with Avril Lavigne, Pink, Lindsay Lohan, and

Overview

Butch Walker has been doing the '70s-inspired rock thing for quite a while, and doing it quite well, though without much acclaim from the general public. The music biz has embraced him as a hot producer, though. Working with Avril Lavigne, Pink, Lindsay Lohan, and Tommy Lee as well as on the second season of Rock Star has brought Walker some connections, fame, and money. Certainly it has given him plenty to write about on his 2006 album, The Rise and Fall of Butch Walker and the Let's-Go-Out-Tonites. The lyrics trawl the seamy side of L.A. fame and are filled with drugged-out starlets, late nights, struggling actors, wild parties, and huge morning-afters with pit stops at politics and the music business. The members of his large band whip through the tunes like pros with something to prove, sounding full and tough but also a bit unhinged at times when the moment calls for it, and sensitive when Walker brings the mood down on the ballads. There is a strong Marc Bolan current running through the album, and you also get hints of classic rockers like Thin Lizzy and Badfinger, modern power poppers like the Posies and Oasis (especially on the ballads), and guys like Pete Yorn and Sam Roberts, but you never get any sense that Walker is copping riffs or attitude -- he has arrived at a sound that is informed by his influences but totally his own. Not to mention the fact that, influences aside, the record is a blast, careening from the fiery political rocker "Paid to Get Excited" to the country corn of "Rich People Die Unhappy," from the lush balladry of "This Is the Sweetest Little Song" to the champagne glass-rattling fever of should-be-a-hit-single "Hot Girls in Good Moods." Although it sounds like he might be a little sick of the big-time music biz scene and the junk that comes along with it, Walker should keep the day job if it inspires albums as much fun as this.

Product Details

Release Date:
07/11/2006
Label:
Red Int / Red Ink
UPC:
0828768412428
catalogNumber:
84124

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Butch Walker   Primary Artist,Organ,Bass,Guitar,Percussion,Piano,Vocals
Gavyn Wright   Concert Master
Page Waldrop   Pedal Steel Guitar
Darren Dodd   Percussion,Drums,Background Vocals,Hand Clapping
James D. Hall   Harmonica,Piano,Trumpet,Background Vocals
Michael-Guy Chislett   Guitar,Keyboards,Background Vocals,Hand Clapping
Brad Gordon   Horn Section
Randy Michael   Acoustic Guitar
Yvette Pettit   Background Vocals

Technical Credits

Isobel Griffiths   String Contractor
Rob Mathes   String Arrangements,String Contractor
Butch Walker   Composer,Producer
Bryan Sheffield   Cover Photo
Jonathan Allen   Engineer
Russ T   Engineer

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The Rise and Fall of Butch Walker and the Let's-Go-Out-Tonites 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
how this man manages to make the worlds best music and still not be the worlds biggest superstar is beyond me. This album is one of the best pieces of ear candy i've heard in such a long time. Butch's musical talents always seem to astound me..from the first time I heard "freak of the week" by the Marvelous 3 back in the 90's to when I heard this masterpiece of an album I still get dumbfounded by Walker ability to make every song sound both original and like a tribute to another artist. "the rise and fall of...." is a staple in my cd player (I must have listened to "taste of red" at leats a hundred times the first week i got the album) and I certainly look forward to this musical gods next work of art. I really wish I could give it more than a five.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago