The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government: Volume I [NOOK Book]

Overview

Jefferson Davis was a civil servant in the United States government for much of his life. Davis was elected president of the Confederacy in early 1861 following the Southern states’ secession from the Union. Davis was captured by the Union in 1865 and spent a few years in jail before he was released. Davis spent the rest of his life in the South and wrote the extensive memoir The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government. This version of Davis’ The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government: Volume I includes ...

See more details below
The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government: Volume I

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$0.99
BN.com price

Overview

Jefferson Davis was a civil servant in the United States government for much of his life. Davis was elected president of the Confederacy in early 1861 following the Southern states’ secession from the Union. Davis was captured by the Union in 1865 and spent a few years in jail before he was released. Davis spent the rest of his life in the South and wrote the extensive memoir The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government. This version of Davis’ The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government: Volume I includes a table of contents.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781629219134
  • Publisher: Heraklion Press
  • Publication date: 7/25/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 768,407
  • File size: 3 MB

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2004

    The Southern Ideal

    If people will take the time to really investigate the REAL reasons behind the secession of the South they will find that slavery was not the cause. Slavery did not enter into the war as an issue until after Gettysburg in 1864 when Lincoln himself declared that he would end slavery if he thought it would end the war or continue slavery if he thought it would end the war. The South was more than a location it was a way of life that the Southerner did not want to give up. Check out both sides of the War Between the States and you'll see that both sides were fighting for what they believed in. Don't let Hollywood be your History teacher.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2010

    Highly Recommended book for Yankees and Southerners.

    I have read both Volumes of this book and I must say it is a amazing book and shows that States Rights were the issues of the War for Southern Independence. To Start off the book Davis speak lengthy on the subject of States Rights and the U.S. Consitution and the actions of the North (U.S.) towards the South. You will cleary see by how the North was acting towards the South. You will find what exactley the Confederate Goverment did on the issue of Fort Sumtner and what the U.S. Goverment did on the Fort Sumtner issue and also how the U.S. ignored each and every single state as a nation of its own.

    in the second volume you will read how the U.S. Military acted towards citzens of Maryland when they wouldnt let the U.S Military travel through they're state to attack Southern states. You will also read how the U.S. goverment treated the state of Kentucky (my state) and its citzens with regards to wanting to stay netural during the war and the U.S. goverment not removing its tropps from the state of Kentucky which Kentucky asked for them to do. It gets worse when you read how the U.S. treated the state of Missouri much like the state of Kentucky. It really shows that it was not the matter of slavery. It was the actions of the U.S. Goverment towards the states. Really puts the myth of slavery as the issue of the war to rest.

    In the Appendixes you will find the U.S. Consitution and Confederate States of America Consitution compared. Which it has both full Consitutions wrote out sentence by sentece. Also speeches of Jefferson Davis in the Senate.

    If your looking for a book to see if Davis wrote about hating the black race and wanting to beat them or anything of that nature so you think you can prove somebody wrong is a converstion over the war. You will not find it in this book, and nor has Davis said such things. He speaks little about the black race in this book.

    To the guy that said that this book is futher proof that Davis hated black people and never wanted to put them in a poltical postion. I pretty sure your thinking about Lincoln buddy. He has actually said that.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 9, 2003

    This is further proof that Jefferson Davis hated black men

    Davis gives so much evidence of his hatred in this book. He talks about how he favored slavery, how he didn't want black men as part of the court system, and how liberty isn't meant for black men.

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)