Rising (Special Package)

Rising (Special Package)

4.6 29
by Bruce Springsteen
     
 

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It would be a gross understatement to say that anticipation for The Rising was high. Having previewed one of its songs -- "My City of Ruins," which appears here in radically reworked fashion -- on a post-September 11th benefit show, Springsteen made it clear that the album was going to be more than a mere collection of tunes, and he certainly delivers on thatSee more details below

Overview

It would be a gross understatement to say that anticipation for The Rising was high. Having previewed one of its songs -- "My City of Ruins," which appears here in radically reworked fashion -- on a post-September 11th benefit show, Springsteen made it clear that the album was going to be more than a mere collection of tunes, and he certainly delivers on that promise. For one thing, the album is the first in years to feature the entire E Street Band; in addition, the songs all reverberate with the events of September 11th. On the surface, those two elements would seem to go together like ham and ice cream, but in practice the mixture works stunningly well. On several songs, Bruce revisits the plainspoken blue-collar characters that often pop up in his oeuvre, but here, they face concrete crises, rather than existential ones: The stark "Into the Fire" tells the tale of a doomed rescue worker, while the unsettled "Nothing Man" -- a song of brooding incantation and sharp release -- delves into the survivor's guilt of one who made it out alive. Springsteen departs from tried-and-true formulas on many of The Rising's better songs: Techno beats creep into "The Fuse" (one of the disc's more positive numbers), while the voices of a South Indian choir waft above and around the melody of "Worlds Apart." The ghost of E Street bombast past rears up now and again -- notably on "Mary's Place," which sounds an awful lot like a dusted-off outtake from The Wild, The Innocent & the E Street Shuffle -- but for the most part, the musicians show admirable restraint. That might be a result of producer Brendan O'Brien's careful mix, but more likely, it's the kind of maturity that can only come from a place that's dark, but not without hope. After all, a rising can only come after a fall.

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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David Sprague
It would be a gross understatement to say that anticipation for The Rising was high. Having previewed one of its songs -- "My City of Ruins," which appears here in radically reworked fashion -- on a post-September 11th benefit show, Springsteen made it clear that the album was going to be more than a mere collection of tunes, and he certainly delivers on that promise. For one thing, the album is the first in years to feature the entire E Street Band; in addition, the songs all reverberate with the events of September 11th. On the surface, those two elements would seem to go together like ham and ice cream, but in practice the mixture works stunningly well. On several songs, Bruce revisits the plainspoken blue-collar characters that often pop up in his oeuvre, but here, they face concrete crises, rather than existential ones: The stark "Into the Fire" tells the tale of a doomed rescue worker, while the unsettled "Nothing Man" -- a song of brooding incantation and sharp release -- delves into the survivor's guilt of one who made it out alive. Springsteen departs from tried-and-true formulas on many of The Rising's better songs: Techno beats creep into "The Fuse" (one of the disc's more positive numbers), while the voices of a South Indian choir waft above and around the melody of "Worlds Apart." The ghost of E Street bombast past rears up now and again -- notably on "Mary's Place," which sounds an awful lot like a dusted-off outtake from The Wild, The Innocent & the E Street Shuffle -- but for the most part, the musicians show admirable restraint. That might be a result of producer Brendan O'Brien's careful mix, but more likely, it's the kind of maturity that can only come from a place that's dark, but not without hope. After all, a rising can only come after a fall. The deluxe limited-edition package encases the disc in a hardcover book with a 40-page, full-color booklet that includes extra photos, the Boss's handwritten lyrics, and more.
Rolling Stone - Kurt Loder
With its bold thematic concentration and penetrating emotional focus, [The Rising] is a singular triumph. I can't think of another album in which such an abundance of great songs might be said to seem the least of its achievements.
Spin Magazine - Robert Levine
Obsessed with mortality and suffused with grief, The Rising is the most eloquent artistic response yet to the World Trade Center tragedy. (8)
Entertainment Weekly - David Browne
Reunited with the E Street Band for their first full album together in nearly two decades, he drips inspiration.... The Rising is a ghost story, but it's more, too -- past and present, celebration and wake -- and few others could have pulled it off. (A-)
Time Magazine - Josh Tyrangiel
The Rising is about Sept. 11, and it is the first significant piece of pop art to respond to the events of that day. Many of the songs are written from the perspectives of working people whose lives and fates intersected with those hijacked planes. The songs are sad, but the sadness is almost always matched with optimism, promises of redemption and calls to spiritual arms. There is more rising on The Rising than in a month of church.

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Product Details

Release Date:
07/30/2002
Label:
Sony
UPC:
0696998660021
catalogNumber:
86600

Tracks

  1. Lonesome Day
  2. Into The Fire
  3. Waitin' On A Sunny Day
  4. Nothing Man
  5. Countin' On A Miracle
  6. Empty Sky
  7. Worlds Apart
  8. Let's Be Friends (Skin to Skin)
  9. Further On (Up The Road)
  10. The Fuse
  11. Mary's Place
  12. You're Missing
  13. The Rising
  14. Paradise
  15. My City Of Ruins

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Bruce Springsteen   Primary Artist,Acoustic Guitar,Harmonica,Vocals,Guitar (Baritone)
Nils Lofgren   Banjo,Dobro,Electric Guitar,Background Vocals,Slide Guitar
Clarence Clemons   Saxophone,Background Vocals
Patti Scialfa   Vocals
David Angell   Violin
Roy Bittan   Organ,Piano,Keyboards,Mellotron,kurzweil,Pump Organ,Korg M1,Crumar
David Davidson   Violin
Connie Ellisor   Violin
Danny Federici   Organ,Hammond Organ,farfisa organ,Vox Continental
Carl Gorodetzky   Violin,Concert Master
Jim Grosjean   Viola
Ricky Keller   Conductor
Lee Larrison   Violin
Nashville String Machine   Track Performer
Brendan O'Brien   Glockenspiel,Bells,Hurdy-Gurdy,Orchestra Bells
Mark Pender   Trumpet
Richie Rosenberg   Trombone
Pamela Sixfin   Violin
Michael Spengler   Trumpet
Garry Tallent   Bass
Soozie Tyrell   Violin,Background Vocals
Alan Umstead   Violin
Gary VanOsdale   Viola
Steven Van Zandt   Mandolin,Electric Guitar,Background Vocals
Mary Kathryn Van Osdale   Violin
Max Weinberg   Drums
Kris Wilkinson   Viola
Carl Rabinowitz   Celli
Jane Scarpantoni   Cello
Jerry Vivino   Tenor Saxophone
Monisa Angell   Viola
Julie Tanner   Celli
Asif Ali Khan   Vocals,Guest Appearance
Lynn Peithman   Celli
Jere Flint   Cello
Larry Antonio   Choir, Chorus
Haji Nazir Afridi   Tabla,Vocals,Guest Appearance
Tiffany Andrews   Choir, Chorus
Michelle Moore   Soloist
Carole A. Rabinowitz   Celli
Donald Clive Davidson   Violin
E Street Band   Group
Ed Manion   Baritone Saxophone

Technical Credits

Elton John   Composer
Bruce Springsteen   Composer
Nick DiDia   Engineer
Ricky Keller   String Arrangements,String Conductor
Bob Ludwig   Mastering
Brendan O'Brien   Producer
Chuck Plotkin   Engineer
Toby Scott   Engineer
Billy Bowers   Engineer
David Bett   Art Direction
Christopher Austopchuk   Art Direction
Laurie Flannery   Digital Editing
Dave Reed   Engineer
Melissa Mattey   Engineer
Karl Egsieker   Engineer

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