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The Road to Dallas
     

The Road to Dallas

by David E Kaiser
 

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The assassination of President John F. Kennedy was an appalling and grisly conspiracy. In this unvarnished story, Kaiser shows that the events of November 22, 1963, cannot be understood without fully grasping the two larger stories of which they were a part: the U.S. government’s campaign against organized crime, which began in the late 1950s and accelerated

Overview

The assassination of President John F. Kennedy was an appalling and grisly conspiracy. In this unvarnished story, Kaiser shows that the events of November 22, 1963, cannot be understood without fully grasping the two larger stories of which they were a part: the U.S. government’s campaign against organized crime, which began in the late 1950s and accelerated dramatically under Robert Kennedy; and the furtive quest of two administrations to eliminate Fidel Castro. This book brings to light the complete, frequently shocking, story of the JFK assassination and its aftermath.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

While plenty of authors have argued that the Mafia and anti-Castro Cubans were behind the assassination of President Kennedy, few have done so as convincingly as Naval War College history professor Kaiser (American Tragedy: Kennedy, Johnson, and the Origins of the Vietnam War). Kaiser bills this as "the first [Kennedy assassination book] written by a professional historian who has researched the available archives," and his attention to detail and use of recently released FBI and CIA files put this analysis ahead of many of its fellows. Kaiser focuses on the tantalizing testimony of Cuban exile Silvia Odio, who claimed to have met Lee Harvey Oswald in the company of Cuban activists, and on the U.S. government's efforts to kill Castro and Robert Kennedy's crusade against organized crime. By taking Oswald's guilt as a given and focusing on the people he crossed paths with and their motives and connections, Kaiser mostly succeeds in avoiding complex and narrative-derailing forensic discussions. This is a deeply disturbing look at a national tragedy, and Kaiser's sober tone and reasoned analysis may well convince some in the Oswald-was-a-lone-nut camp. 30 b&w illus. not seen by PW. (Mar.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Kirkus Reviews
A historian takes us, once more, down the rabbit hole surrounding the events of November 22, 1963. After 45 years and countless books devoted to the subject-including last-word, authoritative treatments like Gerald Posner's Case Closed: Lee Harvey Oswald and the Assassination of JFK (1993) and Vincent Bugliosi's recent Reclaiming History: The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy (2007)-a surprisingly high percentage of the American public refuses to accept the Warren Commission's conclusion that a lone gunman killed JFK. Kaiser (History/Naval War Coll.; American Tragedy: Kennedy, Johnson, and the Origins of the Vietnam War, 2000, etc.) agrees that Lee Harvey Oswald murdered the president, but the author depicts him as the simultaneous pawn of organized crime, defending itself against relentless prosecution by Robert Kennedy's Justice Department, and of "the U.S. government-sponsored or tolerated anti-Castro movement," dedicated to overthrowing or killing the dictator. Both of Kaiser's plots center on formerly mob-friendly Cuba which, under Castro, became a communist thorn in the Kennedy administration's side. Relying on raw data available to the Warren Commission and the House Select Committee on Assassinations, materials released pursuant to 1992's JFK Records Act, Soviet archives and the work of previous authors, Kaiser submits his professional historian credentials as a good reason to prefer his analysis over the investigations of his many predecessors. Why his qualifications trump those of, say, Posner or Bugliosi, attorneys well-accustomed to assembling and assessing evidence, Kaiser doesn't venture. Still, the narrative's level of detail, sober style, strict adherence to itsdouble-track theory and plausible argument make it worthy of consideration. Kaiser's scenario hangs together, but it depends on constructions-e.g., the veracity of anti-Castro activist and crucial witness Silvia Odio, the certainty that Oswald was a phony leftist-vigorously and just as reliably disputed elsewhere. In the seemingly neverending arms race between the lone-assassin and the conspiracy theorists, Kaiser adds a serious piece of scholarship to the arsenal of those who believe Americans have yet to learn the whole truth about the assassination of JFK. Agent: Michael Carlisle/Inkwell Management

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780674039285
Publisher:
Harvard University Press
Publication date:
06/30/2009
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
536
Sales rank:
774,048
File size:
1 MB

What People are Saying About This

G. Robert Blakey
Finally a historian, without preconceptions, has looked at the voluminous, once secret documents produced by the CIA, the FBI, and other government agencies in response to the JFK Assassination Records Act of 1992. Kaiser's nuanced conclusions on Oswald's guilt and the ominous issue of conspiracy will command respect from even those who disagree with them. Comprehensive, beautifully crafted, and well-reasoned. An essential addition to the JFK corpus. --(G. Robert Blakey, Notre Dame Law School, and former Chief Counsel of the House Select Committee on Assassinations)

Meet the Author

David Kaiser is a noted historian and a professor in the Strategy and Policy Department of the Naval War College.

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