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The Road to Zimbabwe
     

The Road to Zimbabwe

by Brian Igoe
 

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This is the story of Zimbabwe - told as a series of dramatized adventures interspersed with just a little history. It covers the period from around 1000 AD to the current year, 2013.

It is told in three parts. The first Part, Zambezia, takes us to around 1900, and follows the the Bantu tribes exploding from the Limpopo to the Great Trek and Cecil

Overview

This is the story of Zimbabwe - told as a series of dramatized adventures interspersed with just a little history. It covers the period from around 1000 AD to the current year, 2013.

It is told in three parts. The first Part, Zambezia, takes us to around 1900, and follows the the Bantu tribes exploding from the Limpopo to the Great Trek and Cecil Rhodes.

Part 2, Rhodesia, takes us from 1900 to 1980 and covers the “Bush War”, and Part 3, Zimbabwe, brings us up to date.

We meet Chief Hungwe taking his people from the Limpopo River to build Great Zimbabwe. We meet traders in gold and ivory, Arab and Swahili. We meet the founders of Mozambique from early Bantu through Arabs and Shangaans to Portuguese, and we meet the early whites like Antonio Fernandes who visited the Empire of Monomatapa in 1511 and 1515. We meet the Monomatapa and glimpse the land of his domains in the 17th. century. We meet Shaka Zulu and Soshangane and Robert Moffat and Cecil Rhodes and Charles Rudd and Mzilkazi and Lobengula and a host of others from history. And of course nearer the present day we meet people like Ian Smith and Simon Muzenda and Edson Zvogbo and others - and naturally Robert and Sally Mugabe and Morgan This is the story of Zimbabwe - told as a series of dramatised adventures interspersed with just a little history. It covers the period from around 1000 AD to the current year, 2012.

It is told in three parts. The first Part, Zambezia, takes us to around 1900, and follows the the Bantu tribes exploding from the Limpopo to the Great Trek and Cecil Rhodes.

Part 2, Rhodesia, takes us from 1900 to 1980 and covers the “Bush War”, and Part 3, Zimbabwe, brings us up to date.

We meet Chief Hungwe taking his people from the Limpopo River to build Great Zimbabwe. We meet traders in gold and ivory, Arab and Swahili. We meet the founders of Mozambique from early Bantu through Arabs and Shangaans to Portuguese, and we meet the early whites like Antonio Fernandes who visited the Empire of Monomatapa in 1511 and 1515. We meet the Monomatapa and glimpse the land of his domains in the 17th. century. We meet Shaka Zulu and Soshangane and Robert Moffat and Cecil Rhodes and Charles Rudd and Mzilkazi and Lobengula and a host of others from history. And of course nearer the present day we meet people like Ian Smith and Simon Muzenda and Edson Zvogbo and others - and naturally Robert and Sally Mugabe and Morgan Tsvangirai.

Much of this story is told through the eyes of one family, the Kellys from Ireland, and scenes from Ireland intrude where they are relevant. It is easy to draw a parallel between Irish and Zimbabwean Independence married, perhaps, through the mind of Mugabe's old teacher, Father O'Hea, S.J.

This is a story more than a history. Where facts are known, they have not been altered. But where they are not known, they have been generated..

Much of this story is told through the eyes of one family, the Kellys from Ireland, and scenes from Ireland intrude where they are relevant. It is easy to draw a parallel between Irish and Zimbabwean Independence married, perhaps, through the mind of Mugabe's old teacher, Father O'Hea, S.J.

This is a story more than a history. Where facts are known, they have not been altered. But where they are not known, they have been generated.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940044591110
Publisher:
Brian Igoe
Publication date:
06/08/2013
Sold by:
Smashwords
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
642 KB
Age Range:
18 Years

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Meet the Author

You don’t need to know much about me because I never even considered writing BOOKS until I was in my sixties. I am a retired businessman and have written more business related documents than I care to remember, so the trick for me is to try and avoid writing like that in these books….

Relevant, I suppose, is that I am Irish by birth but left Ireland when I was 35 after ten years working in Waterford. We settled in Zimbabwe and stayed there until I retired, and that gave me loads of material for books which I will try and use sometime. So far I have only written one book on Africa, “The Road to Zimbabwe”, a light hearted look at the country’s history. And there’s also a small book about adventures flying light aircraft in Africa. And now I am starting on ancient Rome, the first book being about Julius Caesar, Marcus Cato, the Conquest of Gaul, (Caesar and Cato, the Road to Empire) and the Civil War. But for most of my books so far I have gone back to my roots and written about Irish history, trying to do so as a lively, living subject rather than a recitation of battles, wars and dates. My book on O’Connell, for example, looks more at his love affair with his lovely wife Mary, for it was a most successful marriage and he never really recovered from her death; and at the part he played in the British Great Reform Bill of 1832, which more than anyone he, an Irish icon,

Out of Ireland, my book on Zimbabwe starts with a 13th century Chief fighting slavers and follows a 15th century Portuguese scribe from Lisbon to Harare, going on to travel with the Pioneer Column to Fort Salisbury, and to dine with me and Mugabe and Muzenda. And nearer our own day my Flying book tells of lesser known aspects of World War 2 in which my father was Senior Controller at RAF Biggin Hill, like the story of the break out of the Scharnhorst and Gneisau, or capturing three Focke Wulfs with a searchlight. And now for my latest effort I have gone back to my education (historical and legal, with a major Roman element) and that has involved going back in more ways than one, for the research included a great deal of reading, from Caesar to Plutarch and from Adrian Goldsworthy to Rob Goodman & Jimmy Soni.

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