The Robin and the Kestrel [NOOK Book]

Overview

Rune, Robin and Nightingale
together they will save us all.
(If we're very lucky)

Rune: She ran away from an abusive home to become the greatest violinist her world ...
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The Robin and the Kestrel

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Overview

Rune, Robin and Nightingale
together they will save us all.
(If we're very lucky)

Rune: She ran away from an abusive home to become the greatest violinist her world had ever known—and when The Ghost of Skull Hill tried to stop her, she played him to sleep!

Robin: No mean musician herself, she must make her own visit to Skull Hill—to recruit the dreadful ghost to their cause.

Nightingale: Alone she could accomplish nothing. So she joined forces with T'fyrr, a strange nonhuman with the face of a raptor and the voice of an angelic choir.

This unlikely set of heroes had the daunting task of saving the King—and through him the Gypsies, Free Bards, and non-humans of the twenty kingdoms. Fortunately, their opponents had no idea how potent a weapon music could be . . . .

At the publisher's request, this title is sold without DRM (Digital Rights Management).
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940148682158
  • Publisher: Baen
  • Publication date: 8/1/1993
  • Series: Bardic Voices , #2
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 63,313
  • File size: 895 KB

Meet the Author

Mercedes Lackey, author of the bestselling Heralds of Valdemar and Bardic Voices series, began life as a child and has been attempting to rectify that error ever since. Named for actress Mercedes McCambridge, she has been trying with no success to get the Benz automobile authorities to recognize the natural link between her name and theirs, and offer her the use of an M100 or some variety of high-end sports car for gratis. This, too, has had a distinct lack of success. Other than writing she can be found at various times prying the talons of the birds of prey she is attempting to nurse back to health out of her hands, endangering her vision by creating various forms of Art Beadwork, and cross-stitching dragons, gryphons, and other semi-mythological fauna. At the moment, her hair is red, her favorite color is green, and she is covered by various members of her flock of pet parrots, cockatoos and macaws, all of which are trying to help her type8shgalal-akejbejks9ife.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 5 )
Rating Distribution

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(4)

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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2004

    Generic fantasy fiction with a musical twist

    And now for the middle book in the Bardic Voices trilogy. This book picks up pretty much right after the events in the first book (The Lark and the Wren), with the free bards Robin and Kestrel, recently married, setting off in their new wagon to explore the world and play their music. Quickly enough they come across the elements of a plot to harm the free bards. It turns out that in one of the large cities in the land a new priest has come to power in the church, and he has convinced people that music is bad (as is pretty much anything that could be considered 'fun'), which means that bards haven't been able to find jobs. Our intrepid heroes head off to find out what is really going on, and they end up discovering a sinister edge to the new priest. This book was okay, but not great. It was entertaining enough, and it seems that Ms. Lackey has put a lot of effort into building the world that the story takes place in, but the story here just didn't grip me very much. The end was never in any doubt, and things clipped along at a pretty good pace towards the inevitable goal. There were a couple nice twists, but for the most part I had that 'been there, done that' feeling going. So, I rate this book average. Not a bad read by any stretch, but I wouldn't recommend paying full price for it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted March 25, 2014

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 19, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2014

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 19, 2009

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