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The Roman Empire: Athens and Its Environs (Traveler's Guide to the Ancient World)

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Overview

Imagine what it would be like to travel back in time and explore the ancient world; to see the ancient wonders when they were new; to see and speak to the people who built and used them.

Written in the style of a contemporary travel guide, the Traveler’s Guide to the Ancient World: the Roman Empire focuses on the historic city of Rome and its environs in the year 300 CE. It offers advice on everything from where to stay and what to see, to ...

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New York 2008 Hard Cover NEW 8vo-over 7?"-9?" tall. Zero wear to attractive cloth boards, center stamped silver lettering on upper half. No names or graffiti, high graded ... quality heavy paper stock, Introduction, profusely & wonderfully illustrated w/Maps, diagrams & drawings, Notes, Index. 160 clean, crisp & solid pp. Excellent Persona cpy/Reference/Giftable. Read more Show Less

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Overview

Imagine what it would be like to travel back in time and explore the ancient world; to see the ancient wonders when they were new; to see and speak to the people who built and used them.

Written in the style of a contemporary travel guide, the Traveler’s Guide to the Ancient World: the Roman Empire focuses on the historic city of Rome and its environs in the year 300 CE. It offers advice on everything from where to stay and what to see, to sampling the local cuisine and shopping for souvenirs.

This carefully researched book paints a vivid picture of life in ancient Rome, and is packed with all the maps, illustrations, and fascinating insights that a tourist or traveler would expect to find in any modern guidebook.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781435101883
  • Publisher: Sterling
  • Publication date: 8/25/2008
  • Pages: 160
  • Product dimensions: 4.90 (w) x 7.60 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Dr. Ray Laurence is a Research Fellow and Senior Lecturer at the University of Birmingham’s Institute of Archeology and Antiquity. He specializes in the Roman city; the life course in the Roman Empire; roads and the landscape of the Roman Empire; as well as tourism and the classical tradition.

He has written many academic books and articles, and has previously published work on Pompeii and travel in the Roman Empire.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 11, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    If you planned to visit Rome in 300 CE, you must take this book, as it details what you'd see, find and experience in thqt imperial city. It's a wonderful writing ploy, and painlessly teaches history at the same time.

    This handy travel guide to Rome and environs gives you all the sightseeing and survival information for your visit to the City in 300CE, during the age of Diocletian (he of the Baths). As any modern guide book will do, it provides history, maps and illustrations of local sights and places of interest, transport( by mule, litter or cart), places to stay, the choice local foods, money, clothing , customs and manners, and the usual useful terms: "Satine caloris tibi est?--Hot enough for you?" or "Caupo! Etiamnunc!--Innkeeper! The same again!". Since it also includes Roman history to the present day, this is a deftly balanced fun book of factual information, and a must for most students of Rome and the classical world. I bought several copies for fellow instructors at our Learning in Retirement Institute, and the response was terrific.( I've also found a companion book in this series: the Traveler's Guide to the Ancient World: Ancient Greece-a guidebook for Athens in the post Periclean Athens of 415 BCE, written along the same lines, and of equal value.) In short the guide is a clever way of absorbing the life and culture of historical times without pain. Buy a copy, and as the Romans are said to say" Die dulci fruere"---have a nice day.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 18, 2008

    Ita Erat Quando Hic Adveni

    I purchased this book on a whim. I did not seek it out but rather it found me (caught my eye) while I was Christmas shopping. The words "The Roman Empire", the sage green jacket color, and the subtle embossing of the same made it irresistible not to pick this book up. Upon opening the book the appeal continued with yellowed (antiqued) pages, ornate header and footer graphics, the latter embellishing the page numbers, and the pages themselves were unusually thick as if to imply (?) they were made of papyrus. The form factor of the book, i.e. dimensions, weight, and apparent density are perfect and make the book a joy to even hold. I had great anticipation (and hope) I had found a gem.<BR/><BR/>The book is written as a travel guide to the Roman Empire in the year 300CE. I'm a tradionalist and refuse to use this new annotation and therefore rely on "BC" and "AD" and so I think 300CE is equal to 300AD. But using this relative date and subsequently basing all dates in the book on it just confuses the issue. I was taught, and still remember, the date of the "legendary" founding of Rome: 753BC, not "1052 years ago" as the book claims. Julius Caesar's assassination: 44AD. The book offers "343 years ago". The author's use of a relative date is gimmicky, confusing, sure to rouse the ire of students of history, and should be omitted.<BR/> <BR/>Furthermore the "travel guide" format is an intriguing idea but I think it almost steals the stage from what I think was the real purpose of the book: to provide information about the Roman Empire. I was hoping this book would be an adjunct to my high school Latin studies and, for the most part, it did add to my knowledge. But the author assumes the reader has significant knowledge of Romans and even I, with (I think) an above average knowledge of the subject was in need of additional information in order to understand what he was trying to say. <BR/><BR/>For example, he mentions the Romans petitioning the "Sabine cities" to have right to marry their daughters. Now I've heard of the "rape of the Sabine women" but what and where were the Sabine cities and who exactly were the Sabines? The Sabine cities are not shown on any of the maps in the book. <BR/><BR/>Another passage talks about the "horrea" (warehouses). He writes, " The scale of importation can be seen in the mound of pottery that continues to grow to the south of the river port: amphorae are taken here and deliberately smashed to create a hill made out of the containers within which olive oil is transported to Rome." What are "amphorae" and why were they deliberately smashed? I've seen the remains of one of these warehouses on the island of Cyprus but this book doesn't help me understand why the containers were smashed instead of reused. <BR/><BR/>It was obvious to me the author knows a great deal about the Romans and their Empire, and he is a pretty good writer. However the words in this book could use additional distillation so they can live up to the look, feel, and perfect form factor of the book.<BR/><BR/>One final thing, the Latin phrases (for travelers) proffered in the book are a curious collection. I'm still wondering how I would work "Non rape me si placet." (Please don't rob me.) or "Ita erat quando hic adveni." (It was like that when I got here.) into a conversation or into a document I was writing. I was partially successful.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted April 20, 2009

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    Posted August 1, 2009

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