THE ROMANCE OF A GREAT STORE [NOOK Book]

Overview

For nearly four thousand years, perhaps longer, caveat emptor ruled the hard world of barter. Yet for the past sixty years, or thereabouts, a new principle has come into merchandising. You may call it progress, call it idealism, call it ethics, call it what you will. I simply call it good business.

Caveat emptor has become a phrase thrust out of good merchandising. It is a pariah. The decent merchant of today despises it. On the contrary he ...
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THE ROMANCE OF A GREAT STORE

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Overview

For nearly four thousand years, perhaps longer, caveat emptor ruled the hard world of barter. Yet for the past sixty years, or thereabouts, a new principle has come into merchandising. You may call it progress, call it idealism, call it ethics, call it what you will. I simply call it good business.

Caveat emptor has become a phrase thrust out of good merchandising. It is a pariah. The decent merchant of today despises it. On the contrary he prides himself upon the honor of his calling, upon the high value of his good name, untarnished. The man or the woman who comes into his store may come with the faith or the simplicity of the child. He or she may even be bereft of sight, itself—yet deal in faith and fearlessly.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940016608655
  • Publisher: RANDALL BRADY SANDERS
  • Publication date: 4/20/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 830 KB

Meet the Author

HUNGERFORD, Sir EDWARD (1632-1711), founder of Hungerford Market, son and heir of Anthony Hungerford the royalist (d. 1657) [q.v.], was born on 20 Oct. 1632, and was baptised at Black Bourton, Oxfordshire (Notes and Queries, 4th ser. vi. 454, by Canon Jackson). He was made a knight of the Bath at Charles II's coronation on 23 April 1661, and was elected M.P. for Chippenham in 1660, 1661, 1678, 1679, and 1681, for New Shoreham in 1685, 1688, and 1690, and for Steyning in 1695, 1698, 1700, and 1702. In January 1679-80 he presented a petition for the summoning of a parliament (Luttrell, Brief Relation, i. 32), and his avowed opposition to the court led to his removal from 'the lieutenancy' of his county in May 1681 (ib. p. 89) . In April 1669 his town residence, Hungerford House, by Charing Cross, London, was destroyed by fire (Peyps, Diary, iv. 161), and he settled in 1681 in Spring Gardens. He obtained some reputation as a patron of archery, and was lieutenant-colonel of the regiment of archers in 1661, and colonel in 1682. But Sir Edward was best known for his reckless extravagance. He is said to have disposed of thirty manors in all. By way of restoring his waning fortunes, he obtained permission in 1679 to hold a market on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Saturdays on the site of the demolished Hungerford House and grounds. In 1682 a market-house was erected there, apparently from Sir Christopher Wren's designs. A bust of Sir Edward was placed on the north front, with an inscription stating that the market had been built at his expense with the king's sanction (see drawing in Gent. Mag. 1832, pt. ii. p. 113). In 1685 Sir Stephen Fox and Sir Christopher Wren purchased the market and received the tolls. The market-house was rebuilt in 1833, and was removed in 1860, when Charing Cross railway station was built on the site (Cunningham, Handbook to London, ed. Wheatley, ii. 248-9). Hungerford sold the manor and castle of Farleigh in 1686 to Henry Baynton of Spye Park for 56,000l. (Luttrell, i. 395), but about 1700 it was purchased by Joseph Houlton of Trowbridge, in whose descendants' possession it remained till July 1891, when it was bought by Lord Donington. In his old age Hungerford is stated to have become a poor knight of Windsor. He died in 1711 and was buried in the church of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields.
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