The Romanov Sisters: The Lost Lives of the Daughters of Nicholas and Alexandra

( 29 )

Overview

A New York Times Bestseller for 12 weeks!

"Helen Rappaport paints a compelling portrait of the doomed grand duchesses." —People magazine

"The public spoke of the sisters in a gentile, superficial manner, but Rappaport captures sections of letters and diary entries to showcase the sisters’ thoughtfulness and intelligence." —Publishers Weekly (starred review)

They were the Princess Dianas of their day—perhaps ...

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The Romanov Sisters: The Lost Lives of the Daughters of Nicholas and Alexandra

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Overview

A New York Times Bestseller for 12 weeks!

"Helen Rappaport paints a compelling portrait of the doomed grand duchesses." —People magazine

"The public spoke of the sisters in a gentile, superficial manner, but Rappaport captures sections of letters and diary entries to showcase the sisters’ thoughtfulness and intelligence." —Publishers Weekly (starred review)

They were the Princess Dianas of their day—perhaps the most photographed and talked about young royals of the early twentieth century. The four captivating Russian Grand Duchesses—Olga, Tatiana, Maria and Anastasia Romanov—were much admired for their happy dispositions, their looks, the clothes they wore and their privileged lifestyle.

Over the years, the story of the four Romanov sisters and their tragic end in a basement at Ekaterinburg in 1918 has clouded our view of them, leading to a mass of sentimental and idealized hagiography. With this treasure trove of diaries and letters from the grand duchesses to their friends and family, we learn that they were intelligent, sensitive and perceptive witnesses to the dark turmoil within their immediate family and the ominous approach of the Russian Revolution, the nightmare that would sweep their world away, and them along with it.

The Romanov Sisters sets out to capture the joy as well as the insecurities and poignancy of those young lives against the backdrop of the dying days of late Imperial Russia, World War I and the Russian Revolution. Helen Rappaport aims to present a new and challenging take on the story, drawing extensively on previously unseen or unpublished letters, diaries and archival sources, as well as private collections. It is a book that will surprise people, even aficionados.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

Olga, Tatiana, Mari, and Anastasia: The four daughters of Czar Nicholas II and his wife Alexandra all died with their parents and their younger brother in July 1918, shot and stabbed by Bolshevik assassins. The oldest was only 22; the youngest, just 17; but even their brief lives and untimely deaths had made them legendary; so mythic in fact, that later more than a dozen women claimed that they were Romanov daughters who had somehow miraculously escaped execution. In this revelatory book, biographer Helen Rappaport uses letters, diaries, interviews, and other documents to uncover the real stories of these strangely fated young royals. Editor's recommendation.

Publishers Weekly
★ 02/24/2014
The lives of the four daughters—Olga, Tatiana, Maria, and Anastasia—of Nicholas and Alexandra, Tzar and Tzarina of Imperial Russia, have been both sentimentalized and overlooked in the years since the Russian Revolution. Nonetheless, the politics of the court were such that they affected all members of the royal family, particularly through WWI and the Russian Revolution, which claimed the lives of the Romanovs. Rappaport (Magnificent Obsession), a specialist on Russian and 19th-century women’s history, works chronologically—a necessary step in understanding court intricacies and the major players involved—beginning with Alice, Princess of Hesse and daughter of Queen Victoria of England, whose own daughter, Alix, was to become the Empress of Russia. Rappaport details the difficulties leading up to the marriage of Alexandra to then tsarevich Nicholas, the birth of their children, and how the Romanov sisters blossomed into charming, capable, and affectionate young ladies. The public spoke of the sisters in a gentile, superficial manner, but Rappaport captures sections of letters and diary entries to showcase the sisters’ thoughtfulness and intelligence. Readers will be swept up in the author’s leisurely yet informative narrative as she sheds new light on the lives of the four daughters. B&w photo insert. Agent: Caroline Michel, Peters Fraser & Dunlop (U.K.). (June)
From the Publisher
"Rappaport paints a compelling portrait of Tatiana, Olga, Maria and Anastasia" — People

"A gossipy, revealing story of the doomed Russian family’s fairy tale life told by an expert in the field."  —Kirkus Reviews

"In their time, Olga, Tatiana, Maria, and Anastasia were depicted in international accounts as a cute, indistinguishable quartet. But Rappaport brings out each one’s character and does it neatly, with a fine touch. . . . While we know that the family’s fate will be tragic, the girls don’t, and Rappaport, with a light hand and admiring eyes, allows the four Grand Duchesses to grow on us as they grow up." —Christian Science Monitor

"Rappaport is good at showing life within the castle gates… [she] makes a genuinely new, interesting contribution to the Romanov story, which is likely to appeal to both general and specialist readers."—Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

"In this new volume Helen Rappaport mines a trove of fresh material as she uncovers the lost lives of the daughters of Nicholas and Alexandra."—Buffalo News

"The public spoke of the sisters in a gentile, superficial manner, but Rappaport captures sections of letters and diary entries to showcase the sisters’ thoughtfulness and intelligence. Readers will be swept up in the author’s leisurely yet informative narrative as she sheds new light on the lives of the four daughters." —Publishers Weekly (starred review)

"The haunting cover photograph of the Romanov sisters will draw readers, and the extensive bibliography will aid those who want to learn more." —Booklist

“As shocking and immediate as a thriller... [A] gripping read.”—People magazine (3 ½ stars) on The Last Days of the Romanovs

“Rappaport offers an absorbing, perceptive, and detailed picture of a constitutional monarchy in crisis.” —Publishers Weekly on A Magnificent Obsession

“An absorbing account of the making of a queen through her awful, protracted grief.”—Kirkus Reviews on A Magnificent Obsession

“Quite simply, stunning. . . . Chilling and poignant, this is how history books should be written.” —Alison Weir, author of Henry VIII: The King and His Court on The Last Days of the Romanovs

“A fluid and astute writer, Rappaport delivers a historically discerning portrait of Victoria in the 1860s.” —Booklist on A Magnificent Obsession

Kirkus Reviews
2014-04-17
The daughters of Czar Nicholas II and Alexandra are just the right subjects for Rappaport's (A Magnificent Obsession: Victoria, Albert, and the Death That Changed the British Monarchy, 2012, etc.) specialties in Russian and 19th-century women's history.This story of the four girls—Olga, Tatiana, Maria and Anastasia—is not just a standard Russian history; witness the passing references to the Russo-Japanese War of 1904 and 1905 and the revolution of 1905. The author's goal is to expose the characters of these girls, brought up very much in their mother's vision of a simple, sheltered life. Rappaport manages to maintain reader interest even as she ticks off the repetitious tale of their boring lives: long walks with their father, sewing, study, tennis and heavy doses of religion. Each year, the family would leave the palace for vacations aboard the Shtandart, the imperial yacht, in the Baltic Sea or the Crimea, where they would pretty much do the same things. A visit to their English cousins on the Isle of Wight illustrated how little social freedom they actually had. Assassination was a way of life in Russia, and the Romanovs' security network was so strict that the family members were restricted from leaving the ship. Their social lives were nonexistent, and their playmates were the sailors on the yacht or members of the czar's guard. Alexandra's weak constitution initially created the family's isolation, which the populace saw as snobbery from the German-born czarina. Add the inept autocrat, Nicholas, the hemophilia of Czarevitch Alexei and the presence of the despised Rasputin for Alexandra's obsessive protection, and the monarchy was ripe for a fall.A gossipy, revealing story of the doomed Russian family's fairy tale life told by an expert in the field.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781250020208
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 6/3/2014
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Pages: 512
  • Sales rank: 16,533
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.80 (d)

Meet the Author

HELEN RAPPAPORT studied Russian at Leeds University and is a specialist in Russian and nineteenth-century women’s history. She lives in Oxford.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 29 )
Rating Distribution

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(16)

4 Star

(6)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 29 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 5, 2014

    Rappaport begins her book with a look into Tsaritsa Alexandra be

    Rappaport begins her book with a look into Tsaritsa Alexandra before she became “Empress of all the Russias.” As Princess Alix of Hesse, granddaughter of Queen Victoria, she led a privileged life. However, after the death of her mother, brother and little sister, young Alix retreated into the safety of family and valued it above all else. In adulthood, this desire to retreat behind closed doors with her family would come back again and again for Alix, and lead the Russian people to misjudge her and her actions.

    After falling in love with, and marrying, Nicholas Romanov, Alix [now Alexandra], found herself thrown into a culture, and tradition, she didn’t understand. What she did know was family, and that is where she threw herself, heart and soul. Bearing four daughters, and then finally, to the relief of all, a son, Alexandra relished the role of mother. Her preference, however, to stay behind palace doors with her children, combined with health issues that kept her from traveling or, indeed, being seen out of the palace, led to much negative speculation on the part of the Russian people.

    While The Romanov Sisters provides much information on Alexandra, Nicholas, and their son Alexey, it provides an astounding amount of detail into the personal lives of Olga, Tatiana, Maria, and Anastasia. Exhaustively researched, the author uses letters, diary entries, official documents, and photos, to bring these four girls to life. Rappaport tells a mesmerizing story, as she meticulous introduces the reader to these four charming girls, with their likes, dislikes, teenage crushes, schooling, volunteerism during the War, and the various activities that kept them busy. Many events/people surrounding the Tsar and his family are seen through the eyes of his four daughters. For example, Alexandra's embracing of the infamous Rasputin is carefully examined. While not wise, her devotion to this faith healer is certainly more understandable in the context of the story Rappaport tells, particularly in relation to the Tsaritsa's hemophiliac son. This is where most history books stop, but Rappaport continues and dives into how the daughters felt about their mother’s advisor, his powers, and his death, which are clearly seen through the letters they left.

    While all readers will know how this tale ends before reading the first page, The Romanov Sisters is not about that fateful day at the Ipatiev House in Ekaterinburg. It is about the vivacious young ladies who grew up as the daughters of Tsar Nicholas. With a degree in Russian Studies, I have read a lot of books about the Romanovs and the last days of Imperial Russia. I have not, however, read a book that so grabbed me and kept me reading late into the night. Poignant, insightful, well written, The Romanov Sisters should be required reading for anybody studying the history of Russia.

    Quill says: This book brings to life the Romanov sisters, and the rest of their family, like no other I’ve read. If you’re interested in Russian history, do NOT miss this book!

    21 out of 22 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 4, 2014

    Just got this book on Saturday, and read the ENTIRE book that s


    Just got this book on Saturday, and read the ENTIRE book that same day (only stopping for dinner!). By way of background, I've loved Russia - and the Romanovs - since 1972 (after seeing the film "Nicholas & Alexandra"), self-taught myself Russian & Soviet history, and THEN got my college degree in Soviet/Russian studies (but didn't do anything with it!).
    I would give this book TEN stars (if that grading system was available). It made me laugh, cry, think and re-examine everything that I had read in the past. Hellen Rappaport has done an incredible thing with this book - giving each of these beautiful young women a "voice" and an "identity" - something that they never had before now. Before "The Romanov Sisters," these four young women were always "OTMA" - just a blank slate of paper-mache cut-outs (the closest anyone came was Pierre Gilliard's description of them and that was almost 100 years ago!).
    After finishing "The Romanov Sisters," I'd highly recommend that fans (and new readers) read "Tragedy at Ekaterinburg."
    God bless Helen Rappaport for her dedication to all things Romanov (and Russian)! The Romanov Sisters" will allow future generation to love this family in a new way and will allow their "memories to be eternal!"

    13 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2014

    I enjoyed the book but I found the parts about the sisters¿ earl

    I enjoyed the book but I found the parts about the sisters’ early years a little bit slow.    I learned allot about Alexandra which I did not know;
    both that she was close to Queen Victoria, she had a lot of health problems and was somewhat eccentric.

    I found the story of the princesses sad.   To me they were the poor little rich girls.  They led very restrictive lives because of worries about their security.
      They were in some ways overshadowed by their little brother Alexey.    Their mother was sick a lot of the time and not available to them.  The sisters did not go to school or have a normal social life.

    The story about their end of life was tragic and I wondered if more could have been done to take them out of the country.

    I am waiting for a biography of the last Tsar, Nicholas II where his two sides (nice family man and political despot) are reconciled.

    When I visit Russian supermarkets in the states, I will see a lot of products with Nicholas and Alexey pictures which
    make me think there is some nostalgia for the Tsar in the Russian community.

    9 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 27, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    This book really did surprise me. What struck me most is how viv

    This book really did surprise me. What struck me most is how vividly Helen Rappaport portrays the Romanovs: not only the four sisters, but their parents as well. In many ways this family was surprisingly normal, which also made them unconventional for their class. Alexandra completely broke protocol and followed her instincts, breastfeeding her own children, taking a hands-on approach in raising them, decorating her own household, cherishing as much family time (and privacy) as possible. The family was so loving and close, their days often so typical, at times I almost forgot I was reading about royalty.

    Rappaport already wrote about The Last Days of the Romanovs, so The Romanov Sisters doesn't focus on that. I think that the weakness of this book (that is, its attention to their unusually monotonous and fairly normal lives) is also its strength. It makes what happens to the the family feel all the more horrific, if that's even possible. Here, they are no longer intangible, abstract figures in a history book; they are people.

    This type of historical non-fiction can easily become dry and dull, but for me, those moments were few and far between. This title is incredibly well-researched, yet for the most part, its copious quotes, notes, and citations manage to stay out of the way of the narrative. Helen Rappaport's The Romanov Sisters is probably the most compelling book about the Romanov monarchy that I've read.

    4 1/2 stars. I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for my honest review.

    7 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 18, 2014

    Two covered well, two not as well.

    I've read a lot on the Romanovs, and this book was a good read. Yet I think the two oldest daughters were covered quite well, leaving the two youngest trailing quite a bit. A lot of diaries were burned and letters lost in the years of their arrest, and the younger two weren't old enough to have left as much behind, perhaps, but there were tantalizing stories that were passed over. An example: a special barrier was built for swimming at the beach as Anastasia had nearly drowned and Tsar Nicholas had saved her. A story like that needs more, not a brief mention. Even in death, the younger two are mixed up. Russia says the sister buried with Alexei is Marie yet other investigators say it is Anastasia. I did learn a lot about the proposed royal matches for the older two, and it reminded me of royals today in media coverage. The reality of their social isolation contrasted with this media fascination with them reminded me of royals today who seek to lead a private life but who are judged by how many appearances they make. Overall, a good read.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 5, 2014

    A sad, true story written excellently

    As a non-fiction book, it is hard to put down, even though you know the outcome. It is a good adjunct to the history of the decline of Russian aristocracy.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 14, 2014

    Their lives are no less than those of other nice girls who

    Died in before and after the blood bath of russian politics perhaps all profits of this book go to world wide children relief like rowlings three little books tales of

    2 out of 27 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 14, 2014

    Daily Mail & Daily Express listed as sources!!! Miss Rapp

    Daily Mail & Daily Express listed as
    sources!!! Miss Rappaport's research Includes the Daily mail and the Daily express. This explains why it is so terrible and full of mistakes. Anyone who knows the subject at all can see various mistakes and will not be impressed. I would think it needed more real research and less publicity.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 8, 2014

    I thought the story was Ok but it the research is from ladies ma

    I thought the story was Ok but it the research is from ladies magazines and not proper archive material and the new letters by Anastasia appear to be fakes as they make little sense against some other well known sources. It is not impressive and looks like it was done in a hurry.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 19, 2014

    The best history of the Russian Romanov Sisters

    This story of the Romanov family can relate to my ex-relatives who where working at the palace. One was a guard and the other one was a cook in the kitchen. Ahtoh Rabopckn was a regiment clerk sargeant rank. Born 1838-1900. Ahha Zpynkoba Rabopckaa was a baker. Born 1831-1964. These names are Russian. He came to America in 1918 and left Anna to settle in Superior WI. Anna came in 1918 with two children and arrived at the coast line for foreign people to go through paper work to settle in the United States. One of her children was lost on the ship and could not be found. later he was found with the captain making rounds. Anna could only speak Russian. She and the two boys took a train to South Superior in Superior WI. to meet Anthony Yaworski at Les Birds tavern. The only words in English were Anthony Yaworski and Les Birds. She called me little cabushca. Little hankie. I only meet her as Anthony had all ready passed away. I also played a Russian Contessa called Irena Romanov in a Murder Mystery Dinner Theater. It was the same time that Doctor Zhavago cam out. I would read this for the history facts of a beautiful family and the hardships they had to go through. I give a 10 star rating. Very good book

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 4, 2014

    One of the very best Romanov books!

    The Romanov Sisters is a wonderful book. Unlike this year's other big Romanov release, The Diary of Olga Romanov, you really feel you know the subject much better. Helen Rappaport has done remarkably thorough research, hunting down long out of print memoirs, sifting through correspondences of relatives, friends, acquaintances far and wide, and even Bolshevik guards. The result is, for the first time, a clear picture of each girl's personality; it's also a moving portrayal of people trying to be decent and humane at a terrifying, violent time. Cannot recommend it highly enough!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 19, 2014

    I Also Recommend:

    I give The Romanov Sisters FOUR STARS. It is a very interesting

    I give The Romanov Sisters FOUR STARS. It is a very interesting book. The writing is smooth and easy to follow. The research is top notch. I definitely recommend this book.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2014

    Wow

    It is so sad that they all were assasinated at a young age. They all died in 1817. So sad ;(

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  • Posted October 6, 2014

    History written as almost a novel. Excellent if you are into history.

    This is an excellent book. I enjoyed it very much. It is written almost as if it were a novel, but all historically documented. I would highly recommend this book to anyone. Enjoy!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 13, 2014

    Excellent read!

    Well researched book. Perfect for anyone interested in history and/or biographies.

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  • Posted August 5, 2014

    An Excellent Biography

    This book will satisfy the Russian history buff and the reader who has little to no background on the events leading up to the collapse of the Romanov Dynasty. It gives a vivid picture of the lives of these young women and their family, something I have not seen before and the research is amazing. An amazingly good book.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 30, 2014

    Wonderful book and beautiful storytelling of the tragic tale of

    Wonderful book and beautiful storytelling of the tragic tale of four lovely princesses for whom there was no happily ever after. Helen Rappaport is a brilliant writer who presents a believable portrait of four sisters whom history has lumped together as one. In this book the reader gets to know Olga, Tatiana, Maria, and Anastasia as individuals with their own beliefs, values, and desires. And even though we know their tragic fate, the end somehow catches us by surprise and brings home the reality of the loss and wasted promise of these very real young women. Rappaport is a thorough researcher with a lyrical style of writing who transports the reader to another place and time.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2014

    Excellent book!

    I found this book to be an excellent and insightful story of the Romanov daughters. It provided info I had not read in numerous other books. It was meticulously researched.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 21, 2014

    Book was a fast read! For a non-fiction book it read really smoo

    Book was a fast read! For a non-fiction book it read really smoothly and I didn't want to put it down even though I knew the outcome. It was interesting to see how different Alexander's public and private personas were perceived. It is unfortunate that the daughters got caught up in the politics of the day. I felt sorry for Maria who they called Fat. It doesn't seem to bother her but most of her diaries and pares were destroyed. A good look at a great family but ineffective rulers.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2014

    It was a great read and really gives you a new perspective on th

    It was a great read and really gives you a new perspective on the Romanovs. 

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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