The Rommel Papers

( 6 )

Overview

When Erwin Rommel died—by forced suicide at Hitler’s command—he left behind in various ingenious hiding places the papers that recorded the story of his dramatic career and the exact details of his masterly campaigns. It was his custom to dictate each evening a running narrative of the day’s events and, after each battle, to summarize its course and the lessons to be learned from it. He wrote, almost daily, intimate and outspoken letters to his wife in which his private feelings and—after the tide had ...

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Overview

When Erwin Rommel died—by forced suicide at Hitler’s command—he left behind in various ingenious hiding places the papers that recorded the story of his dramatic career and the exact details of his masterly campaigns. It was his custom to dictate each evening a running narrative of the day’s events and, after each battle, to summarize its course and the lessons to be learned from it. He wrote, almost daily, intimate and outspoken letters to his wife in which his private feelings and—after the tide had turned—forebodings found expression. To this is added by Rommel’s son Manfred the story of the field marshall’s last weeks and the final day when he was given the choice of an honorable suicide or an ignominious trial for treason. An engrossing human document and a rare look at the mind of the ”Desert Fox,” The Rommel Papers throws an interesting light on the Axis alliance and on the inner workings of Hitler’s high command.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780306801570
  • Publisher: Da Capo Press
  • Publication date: 4/1/1988
  • Series: Quality Paperbacks Series
  • Pages: 596
  • Sales rank: 238,486
  • Product dimensions: 1.32 (w) x 5.50 (h) x 8.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Captain Basil Henry Liddell Hart (1895–1970) was one of the foremost military theorists of our time. His many books include Scipio Africanus, Lawrence of Arabia, The Rommel Papers, and Sherman (all available from Da Capo Press/ Perseus Books Group).

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 6 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2003

    Rommel the last of the Great Captains

    Great men attract great envy. Rommel being one of them must follow the same fate. It is true that history is written by the winner. If you read about Rommel in such bad places as the Microsoft Encarta Encyclopedia you wont learn about Rommel or anything else since it is full of lies and bugs in its account for history just as their software is. Rommel was the last of the great captains. He belongs to a small elite group of men who at their respective times understood war, unline many others who have been praised in such areas. Rommel's name belongs with Napoleon, Hannibal, Scipio Africanus, ect. Montgomery and Paton could have never defeat Rommel. They were not even playing in the same league. Unfourtunately history books and Medioketer encyclopedias such as MS will tell you so. Rommel was defeated by his tremendus lack of resources and by Incapable superiors and not by any man in particular, for he was one of a kind just as Hannibal and Alexander were. this is a great book actually the best to learned about the real Rommel. The only thing I can is what has already been said by Drew Middleton from the NEw York Times 'Both the glamour and reputation of Rommel will be enhanced by this book....It is the RAW material of History' enjoy it

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 20, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    The human part of a great general

    There are many, many books available about Erwin Rommel and sme show even more insight to his strategies than this one, BUT one were written by the grand master himself.
    The Rommel Papers is Rommel's true legacy: he intended to write another book after the Second World War (as he did with Infanterie greifs an / Infantery attacks , after the first ww) but never got the chance. His son Manfred helped Liddel-Hart to create the Rommel papers and annotated his father's letters and diary entries.
    Personally (as a professional historian) I love this book, as it provides the real sources and a real insight into the mind of Rommel. If you read Infanterie greift an and the Rommel Papers you can only feel sorry that Rommel never created the intended WWII book.
    Manfred's additions also provide extra eyewitness testemonies, with the nuance only time can bring. I use this great book to teach as well, as I believe it to be the only book that covers the second world war in all its aspects: the Blitz, the African campaigns, Italy and Normandy, the internal structure of Germany, the strange nature and character of Hitler and the helplessness of his generals against him. It is the story of the rise and fall of one officer. It's like an epic in that sense. It's also great to see Rommel's cmments on the Russian front, the politics and the struggle of the Allies with Stalin.

    In short: this is an amazing, must-have book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 25, 2000

    MUST READ!!

    This book is the most definitive work on the Panzers in recent years. It tracks Rommel's French campaign in 5/40 to his forced suicide in 10/44.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2005

    Rommel wasn't as good as many thought....

    A good book, mostly written by the man himself while in the field, recommended, but one must understand the full story of WWII to know that Rommel was not a military genius, but smart enough to use the information given to him by Axis codebreakers telling him where to strike. Just before El Alamein Allied codebreakers gained the advantage of 'intelligence', and when left in the dark, Rommel proceeded to lose every engagement thereafter, resulting in declining health and an early trip back to Germany and his death.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 11, 2000

    TRULY INCREDIBLE FORTELLING OF TODAY'S WARFARE

    Reading the evolution of modern warfare as it happened was facinating. In the late 1930s, Rommel predicted (and demanded) coordinated land-air attacks. Rommel's code of leadership and insights into the mind of a true field general are absolute 'must' reading for today's military leaders. Once Rommel knew that he was to die, he wrote some advice for the future. The words from his crystal ball are spell binding. Rommel's predictions for the 'coming' American-Soviet war, which he predicted would be fought on German soil, is simply... chilling.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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