Rough Guide to American Roots

Rough Guide to American Roots

     
 

A collection that attempts to cover the various aspects of roots music in America. Given the extreme variety of traditional music forms from the country, this is a rather daunting task. Nonetheless, the compilers do a good job for the most part here, covering the majority of the important sectors, switching between classic performers and relatively unknown… See more details below

Overview

A collection that attempts to cover the various aspects of roots music in America. Given the extreme variety of traditional music forms from the country, this is a rather daunting task. Nonetheless, the compilers do a good job for the most part here, covering the majority of the important sectors, switching between classic performers and relatively unknown up-and-comers in the various genres. The album opens up with what will become the main focus genre for the album with Ralph Stanley's bluegrass. This example, however, hails from the late 19th century, making it one of the older styles available. Another bluegrass singer, this time female, follows. Steve Riley presents some contemporary Cajun stylings with the Mamou Playboys, and the album takes a turn for the older with Koko Taylor's classic "Voodoo Woman" as an example of the powerful female Chicago blues singers. Rebirth Brass Band founder Kermit Ruffins contributes a piece of old-style New Orleans jazz, complete with the trademark collective improvisation. Moving into the soul end of the spectrum from there, the Staple Singers show off Southern soul and Mahalia Jackson stands as the ultimate representative of gospel. Continuing in the south again, Rosie Ledet is presented as a rare female zydeco star with some serious drive in her music, and Flaco Jimenez shows off the Tejano sounds of his accordion. Big Mama Thornton is used for early rock & roll (though regrettably not with "Hound Dog"), the Soul Stirrers (with Sam Cooke) for newer gospel, and the duo of Pete Seeger and Woody Guthrie for folk. Muddy Waters brings the electric blues and Bill Monroe returns the album to bluegrass as the most famous instrumentalist of the genre. David Grisman's newgrass follows, paving the way for more country-oriented performances by Ricky Skaggs and a piece from the Carter Family archives. Tau Moe and Bob Brozman perform some Hawaiian steel and classic falsetto vocals, and the album finishes on the contemporary Native American forms embraced by Joanne Shenandoah. Given the enormity of the task at hand, the people at Rough Guide did a fine job of collecting the styles necessary to make a collection of American roots music. There are holes in styles here, certainly, but the majority of those holes have close relatives still represented. For a very basic single-album rundown of traditional American music, this album isn't a bad way to go.

Read More

Product Details

Release Date:
06/17/2003
Label:
World Music Network
UPC:
0605633111323
catalogNumber:
331113

Tracks

Read More

Album Credits

Technical Credits

Koko Taylor   Composer
Bill Monroe   Composer
Dewey Balfa   Composer
Woody Guthrie   Composer
Tom Paxton   Composer
Billy Squier   Composer
Bob Brozman   Arranger
Fats Waller   Composer
Johnny Carroll   Composer
Andy Razaf   Composer
Joanne Shenandoah   Arranger
Claire Lynch   Composer
Jim Mills   Composer
McKinley Morganfield   Composer
Tom Wasinger   Arranger
Rosie Ledet   Composer
Willie Mae Thornton   Composer
Harry Brooks   Composer
Rev. B.W. Smith   Composer
Traditional   Composer
Lucie E. Campbell   Composer
Pete Roberts   Composer
Wildcat   Artwork
Moe Family   Arranger
Dan "Boxcar" Rosenberg   Sleeve Notes
Henry Krieger   Composer
Leroy Fullylove   Composer
Larry Lynch   Composer

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >