The Rough Guide to Australia 8

The Rough Guide to Australia 8

by Margo Daly, Anne Dehne, David Leffman, Chris Scott, Rough Guides
     
 

The Rough Guide to Australia, now in its eighth edition, is your indispensable guide to one of the most unforgettable countries on earth. The guide opens with the full- colour introduction bursting with ''what not to miss'', from travelling the magnificent great ocean road to catching the Manly ferry across Sydney harbour. The main chapters of the guide,

Overview

The Rough Guide to Australia, now in its eighth edition, is your indispensable guide to one of the most unforgettable countries on earth. The guide opens with the full- colour introduction bursting with ''what not to miss'', from travelling the magnificent great ocean road to catching the Manly ferry across Sydney harbour. The main chapters of the guide, arranged by region, provide detailed coverage of all the attractions from glamorous Sydney to the rugged grandeur of the Red Centre. Throughout there are “author picks” highlighting the top places to eat, drink and stay to suit every budget. You’ll find expert background on everything from wine tasting in the Hunter Valley to scuba diving on the Great Barrier Reef. There are practical tips on activities, from sailing the Whitsundays to four-wheel driving around Fraser Island and getting the most out of Sydney''s Mardi Gras. The guide also takes a comprehensive look at Australia’s history, wildlife, cinema, fascinating aboriginal culture and comes complete with the clearest maps and plans of any guide.

The Rough Guide to Australia is like having a local friend plan your trip.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781843538578
Publisher:
DK Publishing, Inc.
Publication date:
09/17/2007
Series:
Rough Guides Travel Series
Pages:
1136
Product dimensions:
5.12(w) x 7.76(h) x 1.32(d)

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

When to go
Australia's climate has become less predictable in recent times, although like the rest of the planet the country has rarely had stable weather patterns over the last few thousand years. Recently observed phenomena, such as an extended drought in the eastern Outback, the cyclic El Nio effect, and even the hole in the ozone layer - which is disturbingly close to the country - are probably part of a long-term pattern.
Visitors from the northern hemisphere should remember that, as early colonials observed, in Australia "Nature is horribly reversed": when it's winter or summer in the northern hemisphere, the opposite season prevails Down Under. Although this is easy to remember, the principle becomes harder to apply to the transitional seasons of spring and autumn. To confuse things further, the four seasons only really exist outside of the tropics in the southern half of the country. Here, you'll find reliably warm summers at the coast with regular, but thankfully brief, heatwaves in excess of 40C. Head inland, and the temperatures rise further. Winters, on the other hand, can be miserable, particularly in Victoria, where the short days add to the gloom. Tasmania's highlands make for unpredictable weather all year round, although summer is the best time to explore the island's outdoor attractions.
In the coastal tropics, weather basically falls into two seasons. The best time to visit is during the hot and cloudless Dry (from April to November), with moderate coastal humidity maintaining a pleasant temperature day and night and cooler nights inland. In contrast, the Wet - particularly the "Build Up" in November or December before the rains - is very uncomfortable and is marked by stifling, near-total humidity. As storm clouds gather, rising temperatures, humidity and tension can provoke irrational behaviour in the psychologically unacclimatized - something known as "going troppo". Nevertheless, the mid-Wet's daily downpours and enervating mugginess can be quite intoxicating, compelling a hyper-relaxed inactivity for which these regions are known; furthermore the countryside - if you can reach it - looks its best at this time.
Australia's interior is an arid semi-desert with very little rain, high summer temperatures and occasionally freezing winter nights. Unless you're properly equipped to cope with these extremes, you'd be better off coming here during the transitional seasons between April and June, and or October and November.
In general, the best time to visit the south is during the Australian summer, from December to March, though long summer holidays from Christmas through January mean that prices are higher and beaches more crowded at this time. In the tropical north the best months are from May to October, while in the Centre they are from October to November and from March to May. If you want to tour extensively, keep to the southern coasts in summer and head north for the winter.

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