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Rough Guide to Brazilian Electronica
     

The Rough Guide to Brazilian Electronica

 
The Brazilian electronica scene had been exploding in the few years leading up to the release of The Rough Guide to Brazilian Electronica, working in samba and the more pop MPB forms, as well as taking on regional music from around the country. After it's start in east Sao Paolo, the Brazilian electronica scene spread across the country and developed a life of

Overview

The Brazilian electronica scene had been exploding in the few years leading up to the release of The Rough Guide to Brazilian Electronica, working in samba and the more pop MPB forms, as well as taking on regional music from around the country. After it's start in east Sao Paolo, the Brazilian electronica scene spread across the country and developed a life of its own that grew beyond obvious styles into something new and, in its own way, revolutionary. Much of the credit belongs to the late Suba, who opened a lot of ears to the possibilities of electronic music within the Brazilian form, and Nacao Zumbi (who aren't represented here), on their own work after the death of Chico Science. Much of this group, however, are two or three stages down the road -- like Rebeca Matta, who obviously loves melody but places it a different context of sound and rhythm. Fernanda Porto is a little more traditional in her concept of songs, but a truly brilliant multi-instrumentalist and singer with a thoroughly modern view of music. There's nothing with immediate European or North American analogs here, simply because the musicians come from a different background. Take Claudia Telles' version of "Samba de Uma Nota Só" ("One Note Samba") for example. The shape and melody remain intact, but the framework is utterly different. Superagua's "Stylish" is a quiet little gem, ending in peaceful acoustic guitar arpeggios. Luiz Macedo deconstructs lounge bossa nova on his track, letting the cheesiest aspects peek out unrepentantly, while Rica Amabis offers his own, funkier deconstruction of several styles. O Discurso use samba as breakbeat in "O Sertao," a fascinating little excursion that rounds everything out and offers a pretty full picture of what was happening in one aspect of Brazilian music.

Product Details

Release Date:
09/23/2003
Label:
World Music Network
UPC:
0605633112320
catalogNumber:
331123

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