The Round House [NOOK Book]

Overview

National Book Award Winner

One Sunday in the spring of 1988, a woman living on a reservation in North Dakota is attacked. The details of the crime are slow to surface as Geraldine Coutts is traumatized and reluctant to relive or reveal what happened, either to the police or to her husband, Bazil, and thirteen-year-old son, Joe. In one day, Joe's life is irrevocably transformed. He tries to heal his mother, but she will not leave her bed and slips into an abyss of solitude. ...

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The Round House

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Overview

National Book Award Winner

One Sunday in the spring of 1988, a woman living on a reservation in North Dakota is attacked. The details of the crime are slow to surface as Geraldine Coutts is traumatized and reluctant to relive or reveal what happened, either to the police or to her husband, Bazil, and thirteen-year-old son, Joe. In one day, Joe's life is irrevocably transformed. He tries to heal his mother, but she will not leave her bed and slips into an abyss of solitude. Increasingly alone, Joe finds himself thrust prematurely into an adult world for which he is ill prepared.

While his father, who is a tribal judge, endeavors to wrest justice from a situation that defies his efforts, Joe becomes frustrated with the official investigation and sets out with his trusted friends, Cappy, Zack, and Angus, to get some answers of his own. Their quest takes them first to the Round House, a sacred space and place of worship for the Ojibwe. And this is only the beginning.

Written with undeniable urgency, and illuminating the harsh realities of contemporary life in a community where Ojibwe and white live uneasily together, The Round House is a brilliant and entertaining novel, a masterpiece of literary fiction. Louise Erdrich embraces tragedy, the comic, a spirit world very much present in the lives of her all-too-human characters, and a tale of injustice that is, unfortunately, an authentic reflection of what happens in our own world today.

Winner of the 2012 National Book Award for Fiction

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Editorial Reviews

The Washington Post
Book by book, over the past three decades, Louise Erdrich has built one of the most moving and engrossing collections of novels in American literature…Joe is an incredibly endearing narrator, full of urgency and radiant candor…and the story he tells transforms a sad, isolated crime into a revelation about how maturity alters our relationship with our parents, delivering us into new kinds of love and pain.
—Michael Dirda
The New York Times Book Review
The Round House represents something of a departure for Erdrich, whose past novels of Indian life have usually relied on a rotating cast of narrators, a kind of storytelling chorus. Here, though, Joe is the only narrator, and the urgency of his account gives the action the momentum and tight focus of a crime novel, which, in a sense, it is. But for Erdrich, The Round House is also a return to form. Joe's voice…recalls that of Judge Antone Bazil Coutts, one of the narrators of Erdrich's masterly novel The Plague of Doves. That's appropriate because Joe is the judge's son…If The Round House is less sweeping and symphonic than The Plague of Doves, it is just as riveting. By boring deeply into one person's darkest episode, Erdrich hits the bedrock truth about a whole community.
—Maria Russo
The New York Times
…the novel showcases [Erdrich's] extraordinary ability to delineate the ties of love, resentment, need, duty and sympathy that bind families together…It is Joe's story that lies at the heart of this book, and Joe's story that makes this flawed but powerful novel worth reading.
—Michiko Kakutani
Publishers Weekly
Erdrich, a Pulitzer Prize finalist, sets her newest (after Shadow Tag) in 1988 in an Ojibwe community in North Dakota; the story pulses with urgency as she probes the moral and legal ramifications of a terrible act of violence. When tribal enrollment expert Geraldine Coutts is viciously attacked, her ordeal is made even more devastating by the legal ambiguities surrounding the location and perpetrator of the assault—did the attack occur on tribal, federal, or state land? Is the aggressor white or Indian? As Geraldine becomes enveloped by depression, her husband, Bazil (the tribal judge), and their 13-year-old son, Joe, try desperately to identify her assailant and bring him to justice. The teen quickly grows frustrated with the slow pace of the law, so Joe and three friends take matters into their own hands. But revenge exacts a tragic price, and Joe is jarringly ushered into an adult realm of anguished guilt and ineffable sadness. Through Joe’s narration, which is by turns raunchy and emotionally immediate, Erdrich perceptively chronicles the attack’s disastrous effect on the family’s domestic life, their community, and Joe’s own premature introduction to a violent world. Agent: Andrew Wiley. (Oct.)
Elle
“A sweeping, suspenseful outing from this prizewinning, generation-spanning chronicler of her Native American people, the Ojibwe of the northern plains...a sumptuous tale.”
Entertainment Weekly
“A gripping mystery with a moral twist: Revenge might be the harshest punishment, but only for the victims. A-”
USA Today
“THE ROUND HOUSE is filled with stunning language that recalls shades of Faulkner, García Márquez and Toni Morrison. Deeply moving, this novel ranks among Erdrich’s best work, and it is impossible to forget.”
Philadelphia Inquirer
“Erdrich never shields the reader or Joe from the truth…She writes simply, without flourish.”
Minneapolis Star Tribune
“An artfully balanced mystery, thriller and coming-of-age story…this novel will have you reading at warp speed to see what happens next.”
Cleveland Plain Dealer
“Erdrich’s bittersweet contemplation of love and friendship, morality and generativity…result in a tender, tough coming-of-age tale.”
San Francisco Chronicle
“One of the most pleasurable aspects of Erdrich’s writing…is that while her narratives are loose and sprawling, the language is always tight and poetically compressed…In the end there’s nothing, not the arresting plot or the shocking ending of THE ROUND HOUSE, that resonates as much as the characters.”
Chicago Tribune
“Wise and suspenseful…Erdrich’s voice as well as her powers of insight and imagination fully infuse this novel…She writes so perceptively and brilliantly about the adolescent passion for justice that one is transported northward to her home territory.”
Miami Herald
“Joe may be one of Erdrich’s best-drawn characters; he’s conflicted, feisty one moment, scared and disappointed the next. THE ROUND HOUSE will inevitably draw comparisons to Harper Lee’s TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD…”
Austin American-Statesman
“Louise Erdrich’s prose is spare, precise, smooth as polished stone. Her books are rich with literary muscle.” -Austin American-Statesman
Seattle Times
“The story draws the reader unstoppably page by page.”
Reader's Digest
“While Erdrich is known as a brilliant chronicler of the American Indian experience, her insights into our family, community, and spiritual lives transcend any category.”
NPR/All Thing's Considered
“Erdrich has given us a multitude of narrative voices and stories. Never before has she given us a novel with a single narrative voice so smart, rich and full of surprises as she has in The Round House…and, I would argue, her best so far.”
People
“Haunting…a bittersweet coming-of-age tale…tender but unsentimental and buoyed by subtle wit”
the Oprah Magazine O
“Poignant and surprisingly funny, it’s the acclaimed writer’s best book yet.”
Fall's Best Books Parade
“Moving, complex, and surprisingly uplifting…likely to be dubbed the Native American TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD”
Cover/Feature Review - BookPage
"Riveting…One of Erdrich’s most suspenseful novels.... It vividly portrays both the deep tragedy and crazy comedy of life."
Karen Holt
“Erdrich threads a gripping mystery and multilayered portrait of a community through a deeply affecting coming-of-age novel.”
Donna Seaman
“A stunning and devastating tale of hate crimes and vengeance…Erdrich covers a vast spectrum of history, cruel loss, and bracing realizations. A preeminent tale in an essential American saga.”
Cover/Feature Review BookPage
“Riveting…One of Erdrich’s most suspenseful novels.... It vividly portrays both the deep tragedy and crazy comedy of life.”
Ron Charles
“Emotionally compelling…Joe is an incredibly endearing narrator, full of urgency and radiant candor…the story he tells transforms a sad, isolated crime into a revelation about how maturity alters our relationship with our parents, delivering us into new kinds of love and pain.”
Maria Russo
“…a powerful human story…By boring deeply into one person’s darkest episode, Erdrich hits the bedrock truth about a whole community.”
Susan Salter Reynolds
“THE ROUND HOUSE is a stunning piece of architecture. It is carefully, lovingly, disarmingly constructed. Even the digressions demand strict attention.”
Michiko Kakutani
“The novel showcases her [Erdrich’s] extraordinary ability to delineate the ties of love, resentment, need, duty and sympathy that bind families together…[a] powerful novel.”
Jane Ciabattari
“Each new Erdrich novel adds new layers of pathos and comedy, earthiness and spiritual questing, to her priceless multigenerational drama. THE ROUND HOUSE is one of her best — concentrated, suspenseful, and morally profound.”
Parade
“Moving, complex, and surprisingly uplifting…likely to be dubbed the Native American TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD”
All Thing's Considered - NPR
"Erdrich has given us a multitude of narrative voices and stories. Never before has she given us a novel with a single narrative voice so smart, rich and full of surprises as she has in The Round House…and, I would argue, her best so far."
People Magazine
"Haunting…a bittersweet coming-of-age tale…tender but unsentimental and buoyed by subtle wit"
NPR: All Thing's Considered
“Erdrich has given us a multitude of narrative voices and stories. Never before has she given us a novel with a single narrative voice so smart, rich and full of surprises as she has in The Round House…and, I would argue, her best so far.”
O: the Oprah Magazine
“Poignant and surprisingly funny, it’s the acclaimed writer’s best book yet.”
New York Times Book Review
“A powerful human story…By boring deeply into one person’s darkest episode, Erdrich hits the bedrock truth about a whole community.”
Newsday
“THE ROUND HOUSE is a stunning piece of architecture. It is carefully, lovingly, disarmingly constructed. Even the digressions demand strict attention.”
Parade
“Moving, complex, and surprisingly uplifting…likely to be dubbed the Native American TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD”
People
“Haunting…a bittersweet coming-of-age tale…tender but unsentimental and buoyed by subtle wit”
Elle
“A sweeping, suspenseful outing from this prizewinning, generation-spanning chronicler of her Native American people, the Ojibwe of the northern plains...a sumptuous tale.”
Library Journal
Set on an Ojibwe reservation in North Dakota in 1988, Erdrich's 14th novel focuses on 13-year-old Joseph. After his mother is brutally raped yet refuses to speak about the experience, Joe must not only cope with her slow physical and mental recovery but also confront his own feelings of anger and helplessness. Questions of jurisdiction and treaty law complicate matters. Doubting that justice will be served, Joe enlists his friends to help investigate the crime. VERDICT Erdrich skillfully makes Joe's coming-of-age both universal and specific. Like many a teenage boy, he sneaks beer with his buddies, watches Star Trek: The Next Generation, and obsesses about sex. But the story is also ripe with detail about reservation life, and with her rich cast of characters, from Joe's alcoholic and sometimes violent uncle Whitey and his former-stripper girlfriend Sonja, to the ex-marine priest Father Travis and the gleefully lewd Grandma Thunder, Erdrich provides flavor, humor, and depth. Joe's relationship with his father, Bazil, a judge, has echoes of To Kill a Mockingbird, as Bazil explains to his son why he continues to seek justice despite roadblocks to prosecuting non-Indians. Recommended. [See Prepub Alert, 4/23/12.]—Christine DeZelar-Tiedman, Univ. of Minnesota Libs., Minneapolis
Kirkus Reviews
Erdrich returns to the North Dakota Ojibwe community she introduced in The Plague of Doves (2008)--akin but at a remove from the community she created in the continuum of books from Love Medicine to The Red Convertible--in this story about the aftermath of a rape. Over a decade has passed. Geraldine and Judge Bazil Coutts, who figured prominently in the earlier book, are spending a peaceful Sunday afternoon at home. While Bazil naps, Geraldine, who manages tribal enrollment, gets a phone call. A little later she tells her 13-year-old son, Joe, she needs to pick up a file in her office and drives away. When she returns hours later, the family's idyllic life and Joe's childhood innocence are shattered. She has been attacked and raped before escaping from a man who clearly intended to kill her. She is deeply traumatized and unwilling to identify the assailant, but Bazil and Joe go through Bazil's case files, looking for suspects, men with a grudge against Bazil, who adjudicates cases under Native American jurisdiction, most of them trivial. Joe watches his parents in crisis and resolves to avenge the crime against his mother. But it is summer, so he also hangs out with his friends, especially charismatic, emotionally precocious Cappy. The novel, told through the eyes of a grown Joe looking back at himself as a boy, combines a coming-of-age story (think Stand By Me) with a crime and vengeance story while exploring Erdrich's trademark themes: the struggle of Native Americans to maintain their identity; the legacy of the troubled, unequal relationship between Native Americans and European Americans, a relationship full of hatred but also mutual dependence; the role of the Catholic Church within a Native American community that has not entirely given up its own beliefs or spirituality. Favorite Erdrich characters like Nanapush and Father Damien make cameo appearances. This second novel in a planned trilogy lacks the breadth and richness of Erdrich at her best, but middling Erdrich is still pretty great.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780062065261
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 10/2/2012
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 368
  • Sales rank: 4,571
  • File size: 744 KB

Meet the Author

Louise Erdrich

Louise Erdrich is the author of fourteen novels as well as volumes of poetry, short stories, children's books, and a memoir of early motherhood. Her novel The Round House won the 2012 National Book Award. She lives in Minnesota, where she owns the bookstore Birchbark Books.

Biography

Award-winning novelist Louise Erdrich grew up in North Dakota, the oldest of seven children born to a Chippewa mother and a father of German-American descent. She graduated from Dartmouth College in 1976 and Johns Hopkins University in 1979, supporting herself with a variety of jobs, including lifeguard, waitress, teacher, and construction flag signaler. She began her literary career as a poet and short story writer and won awards in both fields.

In the late 1970s, Erdrich began a unique collaboration with Michael Dorris, a Native American writer and teacher she met at Dartmouth and married in 1981. In a creative partnership that endured throughout most of their 14-year marriage, each writer exerted a profound influence on the other's work. Although their names appear in tandem on the cover of only two books, Route Two (1990) and The Crown of Columbus (1991), literally everything either one produced during this time was a collaborative effort. In 1995, after a series of tragic setbacks, the couple separated; two years later, Dorris committed suicide.

From the beginning, Erdrich has translated her mixed blood ancestry into chronicles of astonishing power and range. Her bestselling debut novel, the 1984 National Book Critics Circle Award winner Love Medicine, is a series of interrelated stories about several generations of Chippewas living on or near a North Dakota reservation. Spanning most of the 20th century, the book dispenses with any sort of chronological time line and borrows narrative conventions from Native American oral tradition. Several subsequent novels pick up characters, incidents, and narrative threads from Love Medicine to form an interconnected story cycle.

In her novels, Erdrich explores complex issues of family, personal identity, and cultural survival among full- and mixed-blood Native Americans, delving into mythology and tradition to extract what is both specific and universal. She has been known to rework material, incorporating short stories into long fiction, rewriting, and revising constantly. She continues to write poetry and is the author of several children's books, as well as a memoir of early motherhood and a travel book. She is also a founder of Birchbark Books, a small independent bookstore in Minneapolis, where she now lives.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Louise Karen Erdrich (full name; pronounced "air-drik")
    2. Hometown:
      Minneapolis, Minnesota
    1. Date of Birth:
      June 7, 1954
    2. Place of Birth:
      Little Falls, Minnesota
    1. Education:
      B.A., Dartmouth College, 1976; M.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1979

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 185 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(73)

4 Star

(58)

3 Star

(24)

2 Star

(15)

1 Star

(15)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 185 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 19, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    The Round House by Louise Erdrich just won (like last week!) the

    The Round House by Louise Erdrich just won (like last week!) the National Book Award for fiction. I had this book on my to-read list for a while, but once I heard it won a large award, I had to see what the fuss was about.

    The Round House takes place in 1988 on an Native American reservation in North Dakota. The reservation is shaken when Joe’s mother is brutally raped. Joe and his father, a reservation judge, work to figure out who committed the crime in order to prosecute. This is a good distraction for them, since Mom has completely checked out and spends all her time in her room with the blinds closed.

    However, solving this crime is not as easy as it seems, because the story is a little more complicated.

    Joe’s only thirteen, but while he and his best friends work through their teenage trials and tribulations, they also work to find answers that they will be able to live with.

    The Round House was an amazing read. The story was moving, honest, and emotional. You were able to peek into Native American traditions, as well as some of their struggles with the U.S. government. This is definitely a book I recommend!

    Thank you to Goodreads First Reads and Harper Collins for the copy of this book!

    Thanks for reading,

    Rebecca @ Love at First Book

    9 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2012

    Highly Recommended

    I'm new to Louise Erdrich, so I can't compare this work with any of her others, but I enjoyed it very much. The protagonist, a 13 year old boy named Joe, is wise beyond his years, and is an unforgettable character. I love the way Erdrich writes from her Native American perspective, giving the reader greater insight and understanding of that culture, while at the same time writing a very good story that is both universal and timeless. The story is complex and disturbing in a way real life stories can be, and I appreciated the fact that the ending to this book left me asking questions instead of tying everything up neatly. I should also say that I found the writing to be exceptional, and I will definitely start reading her other books.

    8 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2012

    Booklover

    Outstanding, muli~layered and a very good story.

    8 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2012

    Highly recommend

    This novel is another great piece of literature from Louise Erdrich. I learn so much from her while being spellbound. She knows how to tell a story in the most compelling manner. While educating me about the modern day struggles of Native Americans,she never fails to show me clearly that our common humanity bonds us regardless of nationality of socioeconomic differences. I remain a devoted fan.

    6 out of 21 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2012

    Don't waste your $$

    This was about the dumbest thing I ever read. It could have been alot better, but everything was so disjointed and skipped around. Also it was a real put-off the way nothing any of the characters said was put in quotation marks.

    Very poorly written...wasted two days trying to slog my way through it. It sucked.

    5 out of 27 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2013

    Good Louise Erdrich

    If you haven't read her, this is both a good introduction to her and a bit bewildering. Her writing is amazing - the first sentence will grab you. But some of the references to American Indian history, law and folklore may sail over your head. Also, as before, there are characters re -appearing from earlier novels. Also, if you don't read the New Yorker, you won't necessarily realize that some of the embedded "stories" were in fact short stories previously published. All of that being said - READ IT. She is an amazing writer. She narrates stories that all Americans should know about. And then go back and start with "Love Medicine," her first and go forward. You will relish every minute!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2012

    Intricate, enjoyable, and entertaining story, though dealing wit

    Intricate, enjoyable, and entertaining story, though dealing with social issues that are uncomfortably challenging. Issues are not Anglo-European nor Native American, but human issues. Not all loose ends are tied, but that is how it should be. - Doctor Blue

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 28, 2012

    More great writing

    Great plot...and of course her unique way of delivery.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 2, 2013

    I loved this book

    I don't usually identify with stories about preteen boys, but this is story for anyone with a heart or conscience. Don't skip the Afterword. Knowing that this a story that seems to have no end, makes it that much more poignant.

    It is so well written that the characters will stay in your mind as if you are remembering them as real, not invented. This is a novel but will stay with you as if you lived it.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 3, 2012

    Absolutely wonderful!

    No wonder she has been recently nominated for a Pulitzer Prize for this book - her third time being nominated for writing.

    The book is written through the viewpoint of a young teenager, but is totally identifiable.

    3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2013

    Could not finish. TERRIBLE

    Not a single redeeming quality. Waste of time and money. Terrible terrible terrible. Wish i could give it zero stars.

    2 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 2, 2013

    Not my favorite Louise Erdrich book, but an okay read.

    Not my favorite Louise Erdrich book, but an okay read.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2012

    Excellent

    A very moveing glimpse into a little known part of American society.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2012

    A pretty good read

    I enjoyed the book, thoughbat times it was very slow. Some of the information seemed endless and unncessary and took constraint not to skip it.

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 2, 2012

    an easy read that keeps you wanting to know the end

    Living in North Dakota and knowing of the Native American culture in the area, I wanted to read this book. It didn't give me the insight I thought it would into the culture but instead I found an easy book to read that kept me wanting to know how it ended. The author paints a clear picture of her characters and the book could have been longer to give the characters more depth. I first heard of the book as it was highlighted in the Whole Living Magazine and then I heard about it on NPR, a found it to be a sign that I should read it, I am glad that I did.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 12, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Good story, and it held my interest. Only complaint is that quot

    Good story, and it held my interest. Only complaint is that quotation marks were not used for dialogue, which could be VERY confusing at times The story is told in first-person, so if the dialogue was in first-person too, it was difficult to know whether it was another character speaking, or just the main character narrating.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 24, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    On a reservation in North Dakota, a woman is brutally raped and

    On a reservation in North Dakota, a woman is brutally raped and beaten and nearly killed, but escapes her attacker. What follows throughout this story is a sorting-out, a coming-to-terms, and a desire for justice.

    The story is narrated by Joe Coutts, a courageous thirteen-year-old Ojibwe boy living on the reservation. His family is “wealthy” by reservation standards, with a nice, but modest, home and plenty to eat. His father Antone is a tribal judge, and his mother Geraldine is something of a tribal genealogist-- it’s her job to keep track of family lines and name changes and the like.

    Geraldine is the woman raped at the beginning of the story, and her son Joe must deal with the feelings this rouses in him, and must attempt, along with his father, to repair their fractured family.

    The extended family consists of Geraldine's sister Clemence, who lives nearby with their father Mooshum (Joe's grandfather), and her husband Edward. Also Geraldine and Clemence's brother Whitey lives on the reservation, and along with ex-stripper Sonja he runs a gas station on the reservation.

    Young Joe has the emotional support of his group of friends. Cappy Lafournais is his loyal best friend, and like a brother to him. Zack and cousin Angus round out the group (Angus lives in abject poverty on the res, and it isn't uncommon to see him sporting a black eye or bruised cheek.)

    This story shines a spotlight on the inability to prosecute many crimes committed against Native Americans, due to the convoluted maze of laws in regard to Natives, reservation grounds vs. non-reservation property, and who is even considered to be Native American (which has turned into a complicated formula of what percent you are this or that.)

    One thing I had difficulty with at times is the author's writing style. At times it is very clipped and staccato, which is always a bit of a put-off for me. And the dialogue doesn’t use quotations, which I always find a bit confusing, as it makes it difficult for me to discern dialogue from thought from narrative. But she definitely has a way with words, and at times I felt my mind say, "Oh!" at the way she expressed something.

    Overall I found it to be a powerful story, original and unembellished.

    My final word: Part mystery and part family drama, it’s a tragic story, rife with poverty, abuse, alcoholism, death. But overshadowing it all is a sense of hope, of a people who hold a fragile grasp on all of the good that life has to offer, who suck the marrow from life. There is hope in this young boy Joe.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 24, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Discovering a new, powerful voice, this was my first read of Ms.

    Discovering a new, powerful voice, this was my first read of Ms. Erdrich's work. I was instantly struck by her ease in conveying the setting and the characters on the Ojibwe Reservation. Having spent many years with Native folks from several different Nations in our family business, her writing brought me right back into those memories with an astounding accuracy. She also has created some of the most accurate, moving portraits of teen age boys that I have ever read. Putting thoughtful, good people into the heart of impossible evil and telling the story of their journey to re-discover themselves and some sense of justice, brought this reader serious lessons, but not devoid of humor, high spirits or joy along the way. She captures the spirit that sustains Native people caught between cultural pressures and helps clarify to the rest of America, how far we still need to come to provide equal protection under the law. She has also revealed a great deal of her own heart in the process. She is a first rate storyteller not to be missed. Once I read a bit about the author, I realized that there was another spirit alive in her work. It seemed to me to be the same spirit that had a group of traditional Lakota women find the courage to occupy Wounded Knee back in the early 1970s to protest what passed for justice in Pine Ridge. Ms. Erdrich's story reminded me of the power, humor and strength in another Ojibwe from Turtle Mountain. Leonard Peltier

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 22, 2014

    Of all of her works, this is my favorite, so far. She is a maste

    Of all of her works, this is my favorite, so far. She is a master story teller.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2014

    |[ Snow Leopard Information ]|

    Ad&alpha&rho&tau&alpha&tau&iota&sigma&eta<_>s &#131&sigma<_>r M&sigma&upsilon&eta&tau&alpha&iota&eta |&iota&#131&epsilon
    <be>
    - Well developed chest
    <br>
    - Short forelimbs with large paws for walking on snow
    <br>
    - Long hind-limbs for leaping
    <br>
    - Long flexible tail for balancing
    <p>
    Ad&alpha&rho&tau&alpha&tau&iota&sigma&eta<_>s &#131&sigma<_>r C&sigma|d
    <br>
    - Enlarged nasal cavity
    <br>
    - Long fur with wooly undercoat
    <br>
    - Thick furry tail for wrapping around body and face.
    <p>
    1-5 (usually 2 or 3) cubs are born after a 90-100 day gestation (3-3.5 moons).
    <p>
    These cats are most active at dawn and dusk.
    <p>
    Ph&gamma<_>s&iota<_>c&alpha| &#131&epsilon&alpha&tau&upsilon<_>r&epsilon<_>s ::
    <br>
    Snow leopards are medium sized cats, weighing between 60-120 pounds. Body length ranges from 39-51 inches, and their tail can be almost as long as their bodies. They have thick, smoky-gray fur patterened with dark gray open rosettes.
    <p>
    Snow leopards take small prey including marmots and hares, and they hunt larger birds like snow cock and chukor.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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