The Sabermetric Revolution: Assessing the Growth of Analytics in Baseball

Overview

From the front office to the family room, sabermetrics has dramatically changed the way baseball players are assessed and valued by fans and managers alike. Rocketed to popularity by the 2003 bestseller Moneyball and the film of the same name, the use of sabermetrics to analyze player performance has appeared to be a David to the Goliath of systemically advantaged richer teams that could be toppled only by creative statistical analysis. The story has been so compelling that, over the past decade, team after team ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$21.78
BN.com price
(Save 17%)$26.50 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (16) from $15.88   
  • New (13) from $15.88   
  • Used (3) from $21.77   
The Sabermetric Revolution: Assessing the Growth of Analytics in Baseball

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$26.50
BN.com price

Overview

From the front office to the family room, sabermetrics has dramatically changed the way baseball players are assessed and valued by fans and managers alike. Rocketed to popularity by the 2003 bestseller Moneyball and the film of the same name, the use of sabermetrics to analyze player performance has appeared to be a David to the Goliath of systemically advantaged richer teams that could be toppled only by creative statistical analysis. The story has been so compelling that, over the past decade, team after team has integrated statistical analysis into its front office. But how accurately can crunching numbers quantify a player's ability? Do sabermetrics truly level the playing field for financially disadvantaged teams? How much of the baseball analytic trend is fad and how much fact?

The Sabermetric Revolution sets the record straight on the role of analytics in baseball. Former Mets sabermetrician Benjamin Baumer and leading sports economist Andrew Zimbalist correct common misinterpretations and develop new methods to assess the effectiveness of sabermetrics on team performance. Tracing the growth of front office dependence on sabermetrics and the breadth of its use today, they explore how major league baseball and the field of sports analytics have changed in the decade since the 2002 season. Their conclusion is optimistic, but the authors also caution that sabermetric insights will be more difficult to come by in the future. The Sabermetric Revolution offers more than a fascinating case study of the use of statistics by general managers and front office executives: for fans and fantasy leagues, this book will provide an accessible primer on the real math behind moneyball as well as new insight into the changing business of baseball.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"The Sabermetric Revolution is an excellent and well-written look at where sabermetric knowledge stands today. This is a very useful book."—Tyler Cowen, Marginal Revolution

"The Sabermetric Revolution truly is an engaging and succinct illumination of where the field is and how it got here. The book is ideal for a reader who wishes to tie together the importance of everything they have digested from sites like Fangraphs, Baseball Prospectus, Hardball Times, Beyond the Box Score, and, even, yes, Camden Depot. . . . Well worth the read."—Jon Shepherd, Camden Depot

"Leo Durocher once said that 'Baseball is like church; many attend, few understand.' The Sabermetric Revolution is a must-read for those in the baseball congregation seeking understanding of how objective analytics can be used to determine intrinsic value, identify undervalued and overvalued assets and dynamics, and create competitive advantage."—Tom Garfinkel, former president and CEO of the San Diego Padres

"Moneyball was a good read by Michael Lewis and a good part for Brad Pitt, but as Ben Baumer and Andrew Zimbalist show, it was primarily a good fairy tale. The Sabermetric Revolution doesn't just debunk, but has a high slugging average with all sorts of valuable new insights and baseball numbers. But, be on guard, stats freaks: it isn't doctrinaire."—Frank Deford, commentator for NPR and HBO Real Sports

"Moneyball played an important role in highlighting to mass culture the evolution of decision making in Major League Baseball front offices—but this was only a momentary reflection of a broader movement within the game. In The Sabermetric Revolution, Baumer and Zimbalist provide a much more accurate understanding of the exceptional work of the A's to overcome their expected outcomes and how other front offices continue to advance objective analysis and its role in player personnel decisions. A must read for anyone who wants a deeper understanding of why and how baseball continues to lead the way in the use of analytics."—Mark Shapiro, president of the Cleveland Indians

"Sabermetricians have developed new and important ways of measuring player performance. Baumer and Zimbalist turn the table on the sabermetricians and evaluate their performance. The result is an interesting and balanced portrayal of what the authors believe works and what doesn't, and of the challenges that lie ahead."—Bob Costas, broadcaster for NBC and MLBTV

"The Sabermetric Revolution is like the story behind the story. Michael Lewis's classic tugs at our heartstrings and opens our eyes, but Baumer and Zimbalist help us look behind the curtain. If you've ever wanted to understand what happens in the other offices around the general manager, this is a brilliant book."—Will Carroll, lead writer for sports medicine in Bleacher Report

"Andrew Zimbalist and Benjamin Baumer do the best job yet of evaluating the benefits and the myths of the ever-growing world of baseball analytics. This is a must-read for anyone interested in where sports metrics have been as well as where they're going."—Stan Kasten, CEO of the Los Angeles Dodgers

Library Journal
02/15/2014
Most, or even all, baseball front offices now use varieties of statistical analysis, known as sabermetrics, brought to popular attention by Michael Lewis's Moneyball, in making decisions about their teams. Baumer and Zimbalist (mathematics and economics, respectively, Smith Coll.) here assess the value of the sabermetric approach—and they also assess Lewis's book. The term sabermetrics comes from the acronym for the Society for American Baseball Research. In the very spirit of baseball analytics, the authors analyze carefully and critically. The result is a debunking of most of what Lewis presented in his work and what audiences saw in the movie version. They argue that Lewis overstated the beneficial use of this method and that he misinterpreted its use by the Athletics with certain players. Yet the authors endorse sabermetrics, stating that its use can be helpful with the baseball draft, prospects, and building contending rosters. VERDICT This book is not for the casual baseball fan. However, it is highly recommended for the serious student of baseball or of professional team use of sports analytics.—SKS
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780812245721
  • Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press, Inc.
  • Publication date: 2/10/2014
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 184,920
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Benjamin Baumer teaches statistics and mathematics at Smith College. He was formerly the statistical analyst for the baseball operations department of the New York Mets. Andrew Zimbalist is Robert A. Woods Professor of Economics at Smith College, a frequent sports industry consultant and media commentator, and author of many books, including In the Best Interests of Baseball? Governing the National Pastime.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface
Chapter 1. Revisiting Moneyball
Chapter 2. The Growth and Application of Baseball Analytics Today
Chapter 3. Overview of Sabermetric Thought I: Offense
Chapter 4. Overview of Sabermetric Thought II: Defense, WAR, and Strategy
Chapter 5. The Moneyball Diaspora
Chapter 6. Analytics and the Business of Baseball
Chapter 7. Estimating the Impact of Sabermetrics

Appendix
The Expected Run Matrix
Modeling the Effectiveness of Sabermetric Statistics
Modeling the Shifting Inefficiencies in MLB Labor Markets

Notes
Index
Acknowledgments

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)