The Sandman, Volume 9: The Kindly Ones

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Distraught by the kidnapping and presumed death of her son, and believing Morpheus to be responsible, Lyta Hall calls the ancient wrath of the Furies down upon him. A former superheroine blames Morpheus for the death of her child and summons an ancient curse of vengeance against the Lord of Dream. The "kindly ones" enter his realm and force a sacrifice that will change the Dreaming forever.
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New York 1996 Trade paperback Illustrated. New. No dust jacket as issued. (111305) Trade Paperback graphic novel is brand new in Near Mint condition. Trade paperback (US). Glued ... binding. 352 p. Contains: Illustrations. Sandman Collected Library, 9. Audience: General/trade. Read more Show Less

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Hempel, Marc, and Case, Richard New York, NY 1996 Trade paperback New. Trade paperback (US). Glued binding. 352 p. Contains: Illustrations. Sandman Collected Library, 9. ... *****PLEASE NOTE: This item is shipping from an authorized seller in Europe. In the event that a return is necessary, you will be able to return your item within the US. To learn more about our European sellers and policies see the BookQuest FAQ section***** Read more Show Less

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The Sandman Volume 9: The Kindly Ones (NOOK Comics with Zoom View)

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Overview

Distraught by the kidnapping and presumed death of her son, and believing Morpheus to be responsible, Lyta Hall calls the ancient wrath of the Furies down upon him. A former superheroine blames Morpheus for the death of her child and summons an ancient curse of vengeance against the Lord of Dream. The "kindly ones" enter his realm and force a sacrifice that will change the Dreaming forever.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781563892059
  • Publisher: DC Comics
  • Publication date: 9/28/1996
  • Series: Sandman Series , #9
  • Edition description: REV
  • Pages: 352
  • Product dimensions: 6.60 (w) x 10.18 (h) x 0.48 (d)

Meet the Author

Neil Gaiman
Novelist Neil Gaiman has sent a British businessman tumbling into a fantastic underworld and had a devil and angel comically conspiring to thwart the Apocalypse. He found his biggest success, though, in Death, Dreams and Destruction -- and the four other similarly named siblings who controlled the reins of the human race's emotional impulses in his graphic-novel series The Sandman, a wholesale rejuvenation of graphic fiction that had everyone from Tori Amos to Norman Mailer spinning with, yes, Delirium.

Biography

Neil Gaiman thought he wrote comic books. But a newspaper editor, of course, set him straight.

Back when he was riding the diabolical headwinds of his popular series of graphic novels, The Sandman, the author attended a party where he introduced himself as a comic-book writer to a newspaper's literary editor. But when the editor quickly realized who this actually was -- and the glaze melted from his eyes -- he offered Gaiman a correction tinged with astonishment: "My God, man, you don't write comics, you write graphic novels." Relating the story to theLos Angeles Times in 1995, Gaiman said, "I suddenly felt like someone who had been informed that she wasn't a hooker, that in fact she was a lady of the evening."

Gaiman's done much more, of course, than simply write graphic novels, having coauthored, with Terry Pratchett, Good Omens, a comic novel about the Apocalypse; adapted into hardcover the BBC miniseries Neverwhere about the dark underworld beneath the streets of London; and, inspired by his young daughter, put a horrifying spin on C.S. Lewis' wardrobe doors for Coraline, a children's book about a passageway into a magical, yet malevolent, land.

But it is The Sandman that is Gaiman's magnum opus.

Though he had told a career counselor in high school that he wanted to pen comic books, he had a career as a freelance journalist before his first graphic novel, Violent Cases, was published in England in 1987. DC Comics discovered him and The Sandman was born. Or reborn, actually. The comic debuted back in 1939 with a regular-Joe crime fighter in the lead. But in Gaiman's hands the tale had a more otherworldly spin, slowing introducing readers to the seven siblings Endless: Dream, Death, Desire, Destiny, Destruction, Despair and Delirium (once Delight). They all have their roles in shaping the fates of man. In fact, when Death was imprisoned for decades, the results were devastating. Richard Nixon reached The White House and Michael Jackson the Billboard charts.

Direction from newspaper editors notwithstanding, to Gaiman, these stories are still comic books. The man who shuttled back and forth between comics and classics in his formative years and can pepper his writing with references to Norse mythology as well as the vaudevillian rock group Queen, never cottoned to such highbrow/lowbrow distinctions. Comparing notes on a yachting excursion with members of the Irish rock band U2, the writer who looks like a rock star and Delirium and the rock stars who gave themselves comic-worthy names such as Bono and The Edge came to a realization: Whether the medium is pop music or comic books, not being taken seriously can be a plus. "It's safer to be in the gutter," he told The Washington Post in 1995.

In 1995, Gaiman brought The Sandman to a close and began spending more time on his nongraphic fiction, including a couple of short-story collections. A few years later he released Stardust, an adult fairy tale that has young Tristan Thorn searching for a fallen star to woo the lovely but cold Victoria Forester. In 2001, he placed an ex-con named Shadow in the middle of a war between the ancient and modern dieties in American Gods. Coming in October 2002 is another departure: an audio recording of Two Plays for Voices, which stars Bebe Neuwirth as a wise queen doing battle with a bloodthirsty child and Brian Dennehy as the Angel of Vengeance investigating the first crime in history in heaven's City of Angels.

Gaiman need not worry about defining his artistic relevance, since so many other seem to do it for him. Stephen King, Roger Zelazny and Harlan Ellison are among those who have contributed introductions to his works. William Gibson, the man who coined the term "cyberspace," called him a "a writer of rare perception and endless imagination" as well as "an American treasure." (Even though he's, technically, a British treasure transplanted to the American Midwest.) Even Norman Mailer has weighed in: "Along with all else, Sandman is a comic strip for intellectuals, and I say it's about time."

The gushiest praise, however, may come from Frank McConnell, who barely contained himself in the pages of the political and artistic journal Commonweal. Saying Gaiman "may just be the most gifted and important storyteller in English," McConnell crowned Sandman as the most important act of fiction of the day. "And that, not just because of the brilliance and intricacy of its storytelling -- and I know few stories, outside the best of Joyce, Faulkner, and Pynchon, that are more intricate," he wrote in October 1995, " but also because it tells its wonderful and humanizing tale in a medium, comic books, still largely considered demimonde by the tenured zombies of the academic establishment."

"If Sandman is a 'comic,'" he concluded, "then The Magic Flute is a 'musical' and A Midsummer Night's Dream is a skit. Read the damn thing: it's important."

Good To Know

Some fascinating factoids from our interview with Gaiman:

"One of the most enjoyable bits of writing Sandman was getting authors whose work I love to write the introductions for the collected graphic novels -- people like Steve Erickson, Gene Wolfe, Harlan Ellison, Clive Barker, Peter Straub, Mikal Gilmore, and Samuel R. Delany."

"I have a big old Addams Family house, with -- in the summertime -- a vegetable garden, and I love growing exotic pumpkins. As a boy in England I used to dream about Ray Bradbury Hallowe'ens, and am thrilled that I get them these days. Unless I'm on the road signing people's books, of course."

"According to my daughters, my most irritating habit is asking for cups of tea."

"I love radio -- and love the availability of things like the Jack Benny radio shows in MP3 format. I'm addicted to BBC radio 7, and keep buying boxed CD sets of old UK radio programs, things like Round the Horne and Hancock's Half Hour. Every now and again I'll write a radio play."

"I love thunderstorms, old houses, and dreams."

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    1. Hometown:
      Minneapolis, Minnesota
    1. Date of Birth:
      November 10, 1960
    2. Place of Birth:
      Portchester, England
    1. Education:
      Attended Ardingly College Junior School, 1970-74, and Whitgift School, 1974-77
    2. Website:

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Sort by: Showing all of 16 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 8, 2003

    I luv Gaiman....

    The Sandman graphic novels are absolutely the most wonderful piece of fiction I have ever had the pleasure of reading. If you are a book junkie, and have an eye for fabulous artistry, then Sandman is 4u!!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 27, 2001

    Great almost-ending

    This is a great graphic novel, and is a fitting almost-end to the Sandman series. I loved it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 1999

    Defining Sandman story Well Worth a Read

    Truly ties up alost every loose end and answers nearly all questions left unanswered thru the entire run of the series. It is well worth reading the other books (all of which are also top-notch) just to get to enjoy this wonderful penultimate chapter of the Sandman.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2009

    Amazing as Sandman always is, but the art leaves something to be desired.

    I absolutely love the Sandman series and picked up #9 with great anticipation. The climax of the Sandman story, it is as complex and beautifully told as you can expect from the mind of Neil Gaiman. The Sandman series will take your imagination and your heart to unexpected places, both dark and intensely beautiful. This volume provides a satisfying conclusion to the series (though it is not the last volume, it is the crux of the story).
    My only dissapointment was the art of this volume. Every other volume of Sandman has been wonderfully drawn, but this left something to be desired. Half the enjoyment of Sandman is looking at the compelling art of the world and characters - Morpheus in his torn robes and the adorable Goth-chick Death. This art was poor by comparison. I actually had to flip ahead to see if the whole volume was like that (it is). It lessened my enjoyment of this otherwise excellent volume.

    Everyone should read Sandman. It is a wonderful and epic read, and this volume (despite the art) still deserves 5 stars.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 17, 2004

    Truly, a great story

    In this volume of the Sandman, they tell the story of Dram, and other things surrounding him, and Neil Gaiman did such an amazing job, truly, a great work of art.

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