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The Santero's Miracle: A Bilingual Story
     

The Santero's Miracle: A Bilingual Story

by Rudolfo Anaya, Amy Córdova (Illustrator), Enrique R. Lamadrid (Translator)
 

In this bilingual story of faith, Don Jacobo has a dream that, in the end, is a reminder that miracles do happen. Jacobo is teaching his visiting grandson Andrés how to become a santero. Christmas is coming, snow is falling in the village, and the two are working on a carving of San Isidro, the patron saint of farmers.

The half-finished carving stands in

Overview

In this bilingual story of faith, Don Jacobo has a dream that, in the end, is a reminder that miracles do happen. Jacobo is teaching his visiting grandson Andrés how to become a santero. Christmas is coming, snow is falling in the village, and the two are working on a carving of San Isidro, the patron saint of farmers.

The half-finished carving stands in the living room beside the two oxen and the angel that don Jacobo carved earlier in the month. The snow-covered mountains are beautiful, but the road to the village is impassable. Andrés's parents will not be able to get to the house for the holiday, and Jacobo's neighbor Leopoldo is desperately ill but cannot get to the hospital.

Then comes Jacobo's dream; San Isidro is plowing with the two oxen and the angel is helping. "But we don't plow 'til April," don Jacobo muses upon awakening. "What does it mean?" The night had been bitterly cold and don Jacobo must bundle up to go to the barn to feed his cows and chickens. As he steps outside, he can hardly believe his eyes. The snow-packed road is clear.

Rudolfo Anaya's story of the power of faith, hope, and love will be enjoyed by readers of all ages.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The Santero's Miracle: A Bilingual Story by Rudolfo Anaya, illus. by Amy Cordova, trans. from the Spanish by Enrique Lamadrid, introduces don Jacobo, a santero (a carver of wooden saint statues) in New Mexico. As don Jacobo instructs his grandson in the santero traditions, he worries about a huge snowstorm that strands his ill neighbor at home. But don Jacobo's faith helps bring about a miracle, just in time for Christmas. Cordova's earthy, authentic portraits take on a folkloric woodcut quality appropriate to this tale, which appears in English and Spanish text, side by side. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
When Andres goes to visit his grandparents in northern New Mexico for his Christmas vacation, he never imagines he will witness a real life miracle. At first the young boy spends his days helping his grandfather finish a wood carving of San Isidro. Andres's grandfather, don Jacobo, is a santero, one who makes wood carvings of saints. The older man wonders if his grandson will carry on the family tradition of carving saints or if he will go away to college and chose a different career like his father. Just before Christmas and just before the rest of Andres's family arrives for the holiday, a huge snowstorm blankets the village. Don Jacobo knows the snow plows will not reach them for several days, and he shares his disappointment with Andres that the rest of their family will not be able to reach them in time for Christmas. The next morning don Jacobo, his wife dona Sofia, and Andres receive the surprise of their life when they open the door to the house and see the roads all cleared of snow! The only clue about what happened lies with the wet, muddy boots of their wooden San Isisdro. The brightly colored illustrations and borders which surround them remind readers of the Southwest. With both English and Spanish text and a glossary of Spanish words used throughout the story, this book would make a wonderful addition to any reading collection in a public or parochial school. 2004, University of New Mexico Press, Ages 7 to 10.
—Ramirose Attebury Wendt
School Library Journal
Gr 1-4-Andres's grandpa Don Jacobo is a master santero, a carver of wooden saints, and the 10-year-old helps him make a statue of San Isidro during his holiday break from school. When a New Mexico snowstorm blocks the roads, a miracle involving the wooden saint allows an ambulance to get to a sick neighbor and the boy's parents and sister to arrive in time for Christmas. The story is presented in both English and Spanish, and the Spanish terms sprinkled throughout the English text are explained in a glossary. The plot is a bit thin, but the creative Don Jacobo is a wonderful character and his relationship with Andr s is strong and warm, a good match to the gorgeous paintings in the blue, turquoise, and red clay colors of the Southwest.-E. M. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780826328472
Publisher:
University of New Mexico Press
Publication date:
08/28/2004
Edition description:
Bilingual Edition: Spanish/English
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
504,116
Product dimensions:
10.50(w) x (h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
6 - 9 Years

Meet the Author

Rudolfo Anaya, widely acclaimed as one of the founders of modern Chicano literature, is professor emeritus of English at the University of New Mexico. He is best known for the classic Bless Me Ultima.

Amy Córdova of Taos, New Mexico, is an artist, arts educator, and activist, renowned for her highly contextualized depictions of Latino cultures. She has illustrated over seventeen children's books and has been awarded the prestigious American Library Association Pura Belpré Award twice, in 2008 and 2010.

Enrique R. Lamadrid is a literary folklorist and cultural historian in the University of New Mexico's Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

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