Satyricon

Satyricon

4.0 6
by Petronius
     
 

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This new Satyricon features not only a lively, new, annotated translation of the text, but fresh and accessible commentaries that discuss Petronius' masterpiece in terms of such topics as the identity of the author, the transmission of his manuscript, literary influences on the Satyricon, and the distinctive literary form of this work—as well as

Overview

This new Satyricon features not only a lively, new, annotated translation of the text, but fresh and accessible commentaries that discuss Petronius' masterpiece in terms of such topics as the identity of the author, the transmission of his manuscript, literary influences on the Satyricon, and the distinctive literary form of this work—as well as such features of Roman life as oratory, sexual practices, households, dinner parties, religion, and philosophy. It offers, in short, a remarkably informative and engaging account of major aspects of Imperial Roman culture as seen through the prism of our first extant novel.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

[Ruden] has caught, better than any translator known to me, both the conversational patterns of Petronian dialogue and the camera-sharp specificity and color of the Satyricon's descriptive passages. . . . A quite extraordinary achievement against heavy odds. --Peter Green, The Los Angeles Times Book Review

Relying on. . . her excellent knowledge of Latin, her lively feel for contemporary slang and rhythm, and her infectious love of the work, [Ruden] gives us the full Satyricon; she shows us a man making a comic masterpiece out of Neronian chaos. . . . Her book as a whole, breathing knowledge and affection, is a delight. --Donald Lyons, The New Criterion

This is a really useful volume which can readily be recommended as a set text to students. The ten commentaries at the end are judicious overviews of important topics connected with the work and the suggestions for further reading are up-to-date and intelligent. --Susanna Morton Braund, Yale University

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780872205116
Publisher:
Hackett Publishing Company, Inc.
Publication date:
03/01/2000
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x (d)

Meet the Author

Sarah Ruden, poet and essayist, received her Ph.D. in Classics from Harvard University.

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The Satyricon 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Cliff_from_Alaska More than 1 year ago
What strikes me the most about Petronius' story is how similar some of the situations are to America today. It gives the stories a contemporary flavor that is at once surprising and scary. We live in a fairly decadent society and I think if we don't watch it we will go the same route as the Romans in the not-too-distant future. One can only hope that civilization will prevail and we won't be thrown into a new Dark Age.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Petronius' Satyricon is a unique satire on decadence and pleasure. Although the story takes place during Nero's reign, one begins to see that many of the scenes have relevance to today's society and its own debaucheries. The story follows the adventures of Aschyltus and Encolpio; two rhetoricians who are on an infinite quest for pleasure. Their frienship is challenged by their mutual attraction to Giton, a scoundrelous slave-boy who seems to have more wits and vices than all of the other characters combined. This triad of debauches is also joined by Emolpus, a sheming trickster and pseudo-intellectual who's always looking to hit the jack pot. The most memorable scene in the fragmentary work is Trimalchio's dinner; this chapter surprisingly brings the ancient past closer to modern times in its recital of the characters' casual conversations on money, opportunism, business, and, of course, pleasure. I personally found this translation the most faithful in trying to convey the type of low-brow humor and puns that Petronius seems to have intended in his work. I strongly recommend this translation above other for that reason.