The Scarlet Letter (Illustrated)

The Scarlet Letter (Illustrated)

3.9 2512
by NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE
     
 

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This edition contains added illustrations, and has been formatted for your NOOK.

The Scarlet Letter is an 1850 romantic work of fiction in a historical setting, written by Nathaniel Hawthorne. It is considered to be his magnum opus. Set in 17th-century Puritan Salem, Massachusetts during the years 1642 to 1649, it tells the story of Hester Prynne, who…  See more details below

Overview

This edition contains added illustrations, and has been formatted for your NOOK.

The Scarlet Letter is an 1850 romantic work of fiction in a historical setting, written by Nathaniel Hawthorne. It is considered to be his magnum opus. Set in 17th-century Puritan Salem, Massachusetts during the years 1642 to 1649, it tells the story of Hester Prynne, who conceives a daughter through an adulterous affair and struggles to create a new life of repentance and dignity. Throughout the book, Hawthorne explores themes of legalism, sin, and guilt.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940149029297
Publisher:
Bronson Tweed Publishing
Publication date:
11/07/2013
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
797 KB

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The Scarlet Letter (Illustrated + FREE audiobook link + Active TOC) 3.9 out of 5 based on 3 ratings. 2512 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you can remember the discussions from high-school English class about this book--read it again and see how much you've grown up! If you've been married, betrayed, or have children- it's a totally different read from when your only worry is breaking curfew and going to the mall.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne is one of the most well known pieces of literature, and it definitely deserves its title as an American classic. Set in a puritan colony in Massachusetts, the book depicts the life a young woman named Hester Prynne as she commits the ignominious crime of adultery. However, not only does she commit this sin with just anybody, her partner in crime turns out to be the town’s church minister. Then on top of this, Hester conceives a child she names Pearl. With the scarlet letter of shame she is now forced to where upon her breast, and with the child that was a direct result of her crime, she becomes the towns’ outcast. These elaborate conflicts carry on throughout the plot as Hester struggles to prevail over her disgrace and to keep incognito her fellow sinner. The third person narrative focuses on the development of Hester as she gains independence, and strives to achieve forgiveness and a normalcy back into her life. She starts work as a weaver in order to provide for Pearl, and help give back to the community. The piece also concentrates on Pearl, how she is the representation of a devil child, and her fascination and constant attraction to Hester’s scarlet letter. In addition, although Hester loves her with all her heart, she did not like the way Pearl was conceived. Pearl, along with her mother, is an outcast but develops into a strong, multifaceted child who in some minds, even sometimes in Hester’s, is evil. Pearl’s father is also developed in the story, as he deals with extreme guilt. He is driven almost insane with the knowledge that he should be sharing the same fate as Hester. Hawthorne writes in a way so well thought out, that the reader can feel many different emotions and conjure so many different opinions. Hawthorne pinpoints the themes of evil, sin, and the identity in society throughout the novel, really highlighting a psychological, as well as sociological, way of writing. He depicts these difficult subjects in such intricate ways through the different characters in his story. For example, the scarlet letter A helped Hester daringly analyze herself and her position in society, further letting her accept the awful she has committed. Arthur Dimmesdale on the other hand—Pearl’s father—had the internal burden of keeping his adultery a secret, thus displaying an alternative view and perhaps even a worse off way, to cope with his wrongdoing. Nevertheless, this is only one of the numerous interpretations of the different themes in the book, solidifying that the novel really does have a great deal of complexity. Although the novel is a fantastic classic, it does like anything else have a few weaknesses; some including the loquacious tone Hawthorne turns to when describing in depth different settings, people, and events. The narration during this lags on for a bit before it gets back into more interesting events. In addition, it is a classic, and the writing is obviously written with a different mannerism, which can be taken as a pain to read, or a very poetic technique. Even so, the Scarlet Letter’s benefits outweigh its flaws. The captivating plot, interesting characters, and complex themes keep the attention of the reader and make them want to keep reading to find out what will happen next. That is why the Scarlet Letter is a classic, and that is why it will be read for many more generations to come.
Vovo More than 1 year ago
I moaned, groaned, and complained about reading The Scarlet Letter for a literature class, but as I turned the first page, my attention was seduced. The writing itself is very unique in its style. Mostly, the chapters critically analyze the characters therin, delving into the abyss of thought. As well as displaying a fantastic portrayal of Puritan society, the symbols, the emotions, and the dialogue are masterful. The Scarlet Letter is well-wriiten, thought-provoking, and definitly a book that should continue to be read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The first 17 pages of this particular version of Scarlet Letter is basically a "Cliff-Note" version of the book. Try not to read through it, otherwise you'll have no reason to read the actual novel. I read through the rest of the book, skipping through pages because, well, I already knew what was going to happen.
mmsSC More than 1 year ago
I read at least one classic each summer - some are good and some are actually as bad as I remember from High School. But I really enjoyed the Scarlet Letter.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As a required read in high school, which was quite some time ago, I had to read this story and if I needed a quick nap all I needed to do was pull out Scarlet Letter. Many years later I read it again. I knew there was a reason that Hawthorne had this grip on me. His writing is so dark, yet wonderfully illuminating. No one utilizes symbols better than Hawthorne. The idea that Hester lives on the edge between the city and the woods is a great example of how that represents her situation. It's absolutley brilliant. Also, there has to be a connection to Hawthorne's anguish through the character of Pastor Dimmesdale. The idea of living with so much guilt in a community that was intolerant of 'mortal' sins reveals the soul of Hawthorne and the quiet cry of a man tortured with his past.
I would highly recommend other stories of his, novels or short stories, in order to better understand his anguish and desire for perfection. Once I read other stories it made this novel so much easier to understand. This is on level with Romeo and Juliet without the feud.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I had to read a banned or previously banned/challenged book for class, I chose this book to do the report on, however as I was doing the report I realized that this version definitely is not at all like the original. So if you're looking for the original make sure you choose a different book. There is chapters cut out and sentences changed to edit it so it's not banned anymore. The original is a great book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I had to read this for my English Lit. Class. Although the story is a decent one, the book is so slow moving and filled with a lot of unnecessary details and happenings that didnt help the story progress, they were just there, like a lot of filler. It was difficult for me to get through.
Bookjunkie40 More than 1 year ago
Well I finally finished The Scarlet Letter. I have to admit it was slow to begin, but then the mystery of who was the father was caught my interest. I did figure it out before the book confirmed it, but I have to admit it was the mystery I liked best. The writer did his job, I thought her husband was a jerk which I would guess was the writers intent. I guess the only reason why I read it was because it was on the classic list, and it did stand the test of time for it to remain in today's society, but who am I to judge?!?!?!?
kotachi More than 1 year ago
Ever since my first intro to the Scarlet Letter I have been moved by the way it was written. Knowing how sensitive this issue was during that time frame it was a heart-wrenching story. And it was totally believable. I love the classics but I think this has become my favorite. Sparks the imagination where infidelity is concerned amongst the clergy ranks; tears for the lost innocence of the heroine and ache for the shame and degradation she faced. And it still is happening today!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hey. I'm thirteen and an obsessive reader, and l loved this book. It's an interesting exploration of American's odd relationship with scandal and sex, even today. But be warned: It's tough going. I suggest reading it in ebook form like I did so you can look up words. I would still, however, highly recommend it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
And the movie was awesome. I honestly have the movie on dvr or did dont know if its still on there.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good im jusboredt
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Interesting book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Princess Zelda to anybody                                                                                                                                                                                                       Has Lacy been on lately? I haven't been on myself either, so please let me know.-looks at time- DAM! It's already 7:30am?! Bleh, I have to go really soon..
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
a unwed woman becomes pregnant and refuses to tell who the father is . she is made to where a red A on her clothes symbolizing that she is a adultress because she isnt married
Guacamole More than 1 year ago
Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter represents a dark blend of forbidden love, unspeakable crime, and malevolent revenge. Revolving around one powerful act of passion, the novel addresses the permanent damage inflicted upon Hester Prynne, Reverent Arthur Dimmesdale, and Roger Chillingforth. Set in the Puritan community, Hester's adultery with Dimmesdale renders her an outcast denounced by society. While her crime is of the utmost severity, I found myself sympathizing with her throughout the retributions. Dimmesdale's suppressed guilt torments him, but his position in society prevents confession. Again, my sympathy extended to these helpless figures, human beings defeated by the overwhelming power of love. With an insatiable thirst for vengeance, Chillingforth, while the victim of the initial crime, becomes the aggressor and loses sympathy quickly. Blurring the line of morality, The Scarlet Letter seems to justify sin with a pure devotion, subtly commending the powerful act of passion by making the two involved the subject of one's pity. While the setting of this novel is in Puritan America, its themes are universal. The natures of sin, of guilt, and of penitence are addressed in the novel's carefully crafted plot. Despite societal scorn, regret never seemed to haunt Hester Prynne, making her oddly respectable. Her dedication to fulfilling her destiny was, instead, what won my affection. Determined to overcome the public's animosity, she devoted her time to mothering Pearl and giving back to the community. The series of good deeds following her sin redeemed her in my eyes, and the adultery only served to make her more human, and thus, more admirable. Exploring another fundamental aspect of human nature, the novel raises a question regarding public personas versus private lives. Despite being a high-standing member of the Puritan society, Reverend Dimmesdale failed to abide by the purity he preaches. Unable to ignore his love for Hester, he chose a path other than the Straight and Narrow, dooming himself to a lifetime of penitence. As the two sinners cope with the repercussions of their actions, Chillingforth, the victim of the crime, engages in a ruthless pursuit of revenge. His malevolence and desire to destroy seem to reverse the crime and justify the adultery; rather than acting out of hatred, at least Hester and Reverend Dimmesdale sinned out of love. The juxtaposition of these two crimes blends black and white, and leaves one to ponder the true meaning of sin.
Anonymous 3 days ago
this book sucks
Anonymous 3 months ago
*wakes up from 6 years of slumber*
Emilymhobbs 9 months ago
There seems to be a common theme among these comments. Many readers have mentioned that true understanding of this classic comes with age. High school students who read the "Scarlet Letter," are not plagued by the problems in the book. Age comes with problems and hardships like the ones expressed in the book: marriage, betrayal, and children. This is why most of the readers who wrote a review here are adults; they have experienced some of these things in the book and can relate to it. Readers find this book intriguing because it lures one in by the injustice against Hester Prynne and the hope for retribution and justice.
Anonymous 11 months ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Stumbles in, lost
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Watches them quietly from the streets
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Yeah. Sorry.