The School for Wives and The Learned Ladies, by Moliere: Two comedies in an acclaimed translation.

The School for Wives and The Learned Ladies, by Moliere: Two comedies in an acclaimed translation.

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by Richard Wilbur
     
 

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The School for Wives concerns an insecure man who contrives to show the world how to rig an infallible alliance by marrying the perfect bride; The Learned Ladies centers on the domestic calamities wrought by a domineering woman upon her husband, children, and household.

Overview

The School for Wives concerns an insecure man who contrives to show the world how to rig an infallible alliance by marrying the perfect bride; The Learned Ladies centers on the domestic calamities wrought by a domineering woman upon her husband, children, and household.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780156795029
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
11/15/1991
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
324
Sales rank:
629,103
Product dimensions:
5.31(w) x 8.00(h) x (d)

Meet the Author

RICHARD WILBUR, one of America’s most beloved poets, has served as poet laureate of the United States. He has received the National Book Award, two Pulitzer Prizes, the National Arts Club medal of honor for literature, and a number of translation prizes, including two Bollingen Prizes and two awards from PEN.

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The School for Wives and The Learned Ladies, by Moliere: Two comedies in an acclaimed translation. 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Francophone More than 1 year ago
Molière wrote this play in 1662, and it remains one of the best comedies ever written about the foibles of a lifelong bachelor. Arnolphe is convinced that after 20 years of study, he has put together a series of maxims that will result in the perfect marriage. He thinks that if his wife-to-be follows them, he will never be subjected to his greatest fear (which is being cuckholded). Needless to say, the situation does not end as he foresees. The translation is brilliant. Wilbur does much more than simply retain the sense of the play; he has written the translation in rhymes that capture much of the flow of the original French. Given the considerably different tonalities of the two languages, it is a delight to see how he does it.